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Metabolic Effects of Bile Acids: Potential Role in Bariatric Surgery.
Flynn CR, Albaugh VL, Abumrad NN
(2019) Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 8: 235-246
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bariatric Surgery, Bile Acids and Salts, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Obesity, Morbid, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Signal Transduction, Verrucomicrobia
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2019
Bariatric surgery is the most effective and durable treatment for morbid obesity, with an unexplained yet beneficial side effect of restoring insulin sensitivity and improving glycemia, often before weight loss is observed. Among the many contributing mechanisms often cited, the altered handling of intestinal bile acids is of considerable therapeutic interest. Here, we review a growing body of literature examining the metabolic effects of bile acids ranging from their physical roles in dietary fat handling within the intestine to their functions as endocrine and paracrine hormones in potentiating responses to bariatric surgery. The roles of 2 important bile acid receptors, Takeda G-protein coupled receptor (also known as G-protein coupled bile acid receptor) and farnesoid X receptor, are highlighted as is downstream signaling through glucagon-like polypeptide 1 and its cognate receptor. Additional improvements in other phenotypes and potential contributions of commensal gut bacteria, such as Akkermansia muciniphila, which are manifest after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and other emulations, such as gallbladder bile diversion to the ileum, are also discussed.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Role of Bile Acids and GLP-1 in Mediating the Metabolic Improvements of Bariatric Surgery.
Albaugh VL, Banan B, Antoun J, Xiong Y, Guo Y, Ping J, Alikhan M, Clements BA, Abumrad NN, Flynn CR
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 1041-1051.e4
MeSH Terms: Anastomosis, Surgical, Animals, Anticholesteremic Agents, Bariatric Surgery, Bile Acids and Salts, Blood Glucose, Cholestyramine Resin, Diet, High-Fat, Gallbladder, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor, Glucose Tolerance Test, Ileum, Insulin Resistance, Intestines, Lymph, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Signal Transduction, Verrucomicrobia, Weight Loss
Show Abstract · Added January 4, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Bile diversion to the ileum (GB-IL) has strikingly similar metabolic and satiating effects to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in rodent obesity models. The metabolic benefits of these procedures are thought to be mediated by increased bile acids, although parallel changes in body weight and other confounding variables limit this interpretation.
METHODS - Global G protein-coupled bile acid receptor-1 null (Tgr5) and intestinal-specific farnesoid X receptor null (Fxr) mice on high-fat diet as well as wild-type C57BL/6 and glucagon-like polypeptide 1 receptor deficient (Glp-1r) mice on chow diet were characterized following GB-IL.
RESULTS - GB-IL induced weight loss and improved oral glucose tolerance in Tgr5, but not Fxr mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting a role for intestinal Fxr. GB-IL in wild-type, chow-fed mice prompted weight-independent improvements in glycemia and glucose tolerance secondary to augmented insulin responsiveness. Improvements were concomitant with increased levels of lymphatic GLP-1 in the fasted state and increased levels of intestinal Akkermansia muciniphila. Improvements in fasting glycemia after GB-IL were mitigated with exendin-9, a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, or cholestyramine, a bile acid sequestrant. The glucoregulatory effects of GB-IL were lost in whole-body Glp-1r mice.
CONCLUSIONS - Bile diversion to the ileum improves glucose homeostasis via an intestinal Fxr-Glp-1 axis. Altered intestinal bile acid availability, independent of weight loss, and intestinal Akkermansia muciniphila appear to mediate the metabolic changes observed after bariatric surgery and might be manipulated for treatment of obesity and diabetes.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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25 MeSH Terms
Signaling through non-membrane nuclear phosphoinositide binding proteins in human health and disease.
Bryant JM, Blind RD
(2019) J Lipid Res 60: 299-311
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease, Health, Humans, Phosphatidylinositols, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added January 19, 2019
Phosphoinositide membrane signaling is critical for normal physiology, playing well-known roles in diverse human pathologies. The basic mechanisms governing phosphoinositide signaling within the nucleus, however, have remained deeply enigmatic owing to their presence outside the nuclear membranes. Over 40% of nuclear phosphoinositides can exist in this non-membrane state, held soluble in the nucleoplasm by nuclear proteins that remain largely unidentified. Recently, two nuclear proteins responsible for solubilizing phosphoinositides were identified, steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1; NR5A1) and liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1; NR5A2), along with two enzymes that directly remodel these phosphoinositide/protein complexes, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN; MMAC) and inositol polyphosphate multikinase (IPMK; ipk2). These new footholds now permit the assignment of physiological functions for nuclear phosphoinositides in human diseases, such as endometriosis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/steatohepatitis, glioblastoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The unique nature of nuclear phosphoinositide signaling affords extraordinary clinical opportunities for new biomarkers, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Thus, phosphoinositide biology within the nucleus may represent the next generation of low-hanging fruit for new drugs, not unlike what has occurred for membrane phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase drug development. This review connects recent basic science discoveries in nuclear phosphoinositide signaling to clinical pathologies, with the hope of inspiring development of new therapies.
Copyright © 2019 Bryant and Blind.
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7 MeSH Terms
Allostery between two binding sites in the ion channel subunit TRIP8b confers binding specificity to HCN channels.
Lyman KA, Han Y, Heuermann RJ, Cheng X, Kurz JE, Lyman RE, Van Veldhoven PP, Chetkovich DM
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 17718-17730
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Binding Sites, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Protein Subunits, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains are ubiquitous structural motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions. For example, the TPR domains in the peroxisomal import receptor PEX5 enable binding to a range of type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal motifs. A homolog of PEX5, tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b), binds to and functions as an auxiliary subunit of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN)-gated channels. Given the similarity between TRIP8b and PEX5, this difference in function raises the question of what mechanism accounts for their binding specificity. In this report, we found that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain and the C terminus of the HCN channel are critical for conferring specificity to TRIP8b binding. We show that TRIP8b binds the HCN cyclic nucleotide-binding domain through a 37-residue domain and the HCN C terminus through the TPR domains. Using a combination of fluorescence polarization- and co-immunoprecipitation-based assays, we establish that binding at either site increases affinity at the other. Thus, allosteric coupling of the TRIP8b TPR domains both promotes binding to HCN channels and limits binding to type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal substrates. These results raise the possibility that other TPR domains may be similarly influenced by allosteric mechanisms as a general feature of protein-protein interactions.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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MeSH Terms
Bile acids and bariatric surgery.
Albaugh VL, Banan B, Ajouz H, Abumrad NN, Flynn CR
(2017) Mol Aspects Med 56: 75-89
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bile Acids and Salts, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Enterohepatic Circulation, Gastrectomy, Gastric Bypass, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose, Homeostasis, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Obesity, Morbid, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Rodentia, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added June 6, 2017
Bariatric surgery, specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), are the most effective and durable treatments for morbid obesity and potentially a viable treatment for type 2 diabetes (T2D). The resolution rate of T2D following these procedures is between 40 and 80% and far surpasses that achieved by medical management alone. The molecular basis for this improvement is not entirely understood, but has been attributed in part to the altered enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. In this review we highlight how bile acids potentially contribute to improved lipid and glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity and energy expenditure after these procedures. The impact of altered bile acid levels in enterohepatic circulation is also associated with changes in gut microflora, which may further contribute to some of these beneficial effects. We highlight the beneficial effects of experimental surgical procedures in rodents that alter bile secretory flow without gastric restriction or altering nutrient flow. This information suggests a role for bile acids beyond dietary fat emulsification in altering whole body glucose and lipid metabolism strongly, and also suggests emerging roles for the activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid x receptor (FXR) and G-protein coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5) in these improvements. The limitations of rodent studies and the current state of our understanding is reviewed and the potential effects of bile acids mediating the short- and long-term metabolic improvements after bariatric surgery is critically examined.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Animal models suggest the TRIP8b-HCN interaction is a therapeutic target for major depressive disorder.
Lyman KA, Han Y, Chetkovich DM
(2017) Expert Opin Ther Targets 21: 235-237
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Depressive Disorder, Major, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear
Added April 2, 2019
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Method for Identifying Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Protein-protein Interaction Between HCN1 and TRIP8b.
Han Y, Lyman KA, Clutter M, Schiltz GE, Ismail QA, Cheng X, Luan CH, Chetkovich DM
(2016) J Vis Exp :
MeSH Terms: Depressive Disorder, Major, Humans, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Membrane Proteins, Protein Binding, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Small Molecule Libraries
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed ubiquitously throughout the brain, where they function to regulate the excitability of neurons. The subcellular distribution of these channels in pyramidal neurons of hippocampal area CA1 is regulated by tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b), an auxiliary subunit. Genetic knockout of HCN pore forming subunits or TRIP8b, both lead to an increase in antidepressant-like behavior, suggesting that limiting the function of HCN channels may be useful as a treatment for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Despite significant therapeutic interest, HCN channels are also expressed in the heart, where they regulate rhythmicity. To circumvent off-target issues associated with blocking cardiac HCN channels, our lab has recently proposed targeting the protein-protein interaction between HCN and TRIP8b in order to specifically disrupt HCN channel function in the brain. TRIP8b binds to HCN pore forming subunits at two distinct interaction sites, although here the focus is on the interaction between the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains of TRIP8b and the C terminal tail of HCN1. In this protocol, an expanded description of a method for purifying TRIP8b and executing a high throughput screen to identify small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between HCN and TRIP8b, is described. The method for high throughput screening utilizes a Fluorescence Polarization (FP) -based assay to monitor the binding of a large TRIP8b fragment to a fluorophore-tagged eleven amino acid peptide corresponding to the HCN1 C terminal tail. This method allows 'hit' compounds to be identified based on the change in the polarization of emitted light. Validation assays are then performed to ensure that 'hit' compounds are not artifactual.
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Phospholipid regulation of the nuclear receptor superfamily.
Crowder MK, Seacrist CD, Blind RD
(2017) Adv Biol Regul 63: 6-14
MeSH Terms: Animals, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Ligands, Mice, Models, Molecular, Phospholipids, Protein Binding, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Signal Transduction, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added January 19, 2019
Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors whose diverse biological functions are classically regulated by cholesterol-based small molecules. Over the past few decades, a growing body of evidence has demonstrated that phospholipids and other similar amphipathic molecules can also specifically bind and functionally regulate the activity of certain nuclear receptors, suggesting a critical role for these non-cholesterol-based molecules in transcriptional regulation. Phosphatidylcholines, phosphoinositides and sphingolipids are a few of the many phospholipid like molecules shown to quite specifically regulate nuclear receptors in mouse models, cell lines and in vitro. More recent evidence has also shown that certain nuclear receptors can "present" a bound phospholipid headgroup to key lipid signaling enzymes, which can then modify the phospholipid headgroup with very unique kinetic properties. Here, we review the broad array of phospholipid/nuclear receptor interactions, from the perspective of the chemical nature of the phospholipid, and the cellular abundance of the phospholipid. We also view the data in the light of well established paradigms for phospholipid mediated transcriptional regulation, as well as newer models of how phospholipids might effect transcription in the acute regulation of complex nuclear signaling pathways. Thus, this review provides novel insight into the new, non-membrane associated roles nuclear phospholipids play in regulating complex nuclear events, centered on the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Structure of Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (NR5A2) with PIP3 hormone bound in the ligand binding pocket.
Sablin EP, Blind RD, Uthayaruban R, Chiu HJ, Deacon AM, Das D, Ingraham HA, Fletterick RJ
(2015) J Struct Biol 192: 342-348
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Crystallography, X-Ray, DAX-1 Orphan Nuclear Receptor, Humans, Models, Molecular, Phosphatidylinositols, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Steroidogenic Factor 1
Show Abstract · Added January 19, 2019
The nuclear receptor LRH-1 (Liver Receptor Homolog-1, NR5A2) is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression programs critical for many aspects of metabolism and reproduction. Although LRH-1 is able to bind phospholipids, it is still considered an orphan nuclear receptor (NR) with an unknown regulatory hormone. Our prior cellular and structural studies demonstrated that the signaling phosphatidylinositols PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind and regulate SF-1 (Steroidogenic Factor-1, NR5A1), a close homolog of LRH-1. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human LRH-1 ligand binding domain (LBD) bound by PIP3 - the first phospholipid with a head group endogenous to mammals. We show that the phospholipid hormone binds LRH-1 with high affinity, stabilizing the receptor LBD. While the hydrophobic PIP3 tails (C16/C16) are buried inside the LRH-1 ligand binding pocket, the negatively charged PIP3 head group is presented on the receptor surface, similar to the phosphatidylinositol binding mode observed in the PIP3-SF-1 structure. Thus, data presented in this work reinforce our earlier findings demonstrating that signaling phosphatidylinositols regulate the NR5A receptors LRH-1 and SF-1.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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1 Members
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Identification of Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels.
Han Y, Lyman K, Clutter M, Schiltz GE, Ismail QA, Prados DB, Luan CH, Chetkovich DM
(2015) J Biomol Screen 20: 1124-31
MeSH Terms: Antidepressive Agents, Depressive Disorder, Major, Drug Evaluation, Preclinical, Escherichia coli, High-Throughput Screening Assays, Humans, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Protein Binding, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels function in the brain to limit neuronal excitability. Limiting the activity of these channels has been proposed as a therapy for major depressive disorder, but the critical role of HCN channels in cardiac pacemaking has limited efforts to develop therapies directed at the channel. Previous studies indicated that the function of HCN is tightly regulated by its auxiliary subunit, tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b), which is not expressed in the heart. To target the function of the HCN channel in the brain without affecting the channel's function in the heart, we propose disrupting the interaction between HCN and TRIP8b. We developed a high-throughput fluorescence polarization (FP) assay to identify small molecules capable of disrupting this interaction. We used this FP assay to screen a 20,000-compound library and identified a number of active compounds. The active compounds were validated using an orthogonal AlphaScreen assay to identify one compound (0.005%) as the first confirmed hit for inhibiting the HCN-TRIP8b interaction. Identifying small molecules capable of disrupting the interaction between HCN and TRIP8b should enable the development of new research tools and small-molecule therapies that could benefit patients with depression.
© 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.
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