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Bacterial-derived Neutrophilic Inflammation Drives Lung Remodeling in a Mouse Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.
Richmond BW, Du RH, Han W, Benjamin JT, van der Meer R, Gleaves L, Guo M, McKissack A, Zhang Y, Cheng DS, Polosukhin VV, Blackwell TS
(2018) Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 58: 736-744
MeSH Terms: Airway Remodeling, Aminopyridines, Animals, Bacillus, Benzamides, Cyclopropanes, Disease Models, Animal, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Mutant Strains, Neutrophils, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Pulmonary Emphysema, Receptors, Cell Surface
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Loss of secretory IgA is common in the small airways of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Using mice that lack secretory IgA in the airways due to genetic deficiency of polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR mice), we investigated the role of neutrophils in driving the fibrotic small airway wall remodeling and emphysema that develops spontaneously in these mice. By flow cytometry, we found an increase in the percentage of neutrophils among CD45 cells in the lungs, as well as an increase in total neutrophils, in pIgR mice compared with wild-type controls. This increase in neutrophils in pIgR mice was associated with elastin degradation in the alveolar compartment and around small airways, along with increased collagen deposition in small airway walls. Neutrophil depletion using anti-Ly6G antibodies or treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics inhibited development of both emphysema and small airway remodeling, suggesting that airway bacteria provide the stimulus for deleterious neutrophilic inflammation in this model. Exogenous bacterial challenge using lysates prepared from pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria worsened neutrophilic inflammation and lung remodeling in pIgR mice. This phenotype was abrogated by antiinflammatory therapy with roflumilast. Together, these studies support the concept that disruption of the mucosal immune barrier in small airways contributes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease progression by allowing bacteria to stimulate chronic neutrophilic inflammation, which, in turn, drives progressive airway wall fibrosis and emphysematous changes in the lung parenchyma.
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14 MeSH Terms
Increased expression of deleted in malignant brain tumors (DMBT1) gene in precancerous gastric lesions: Findings from human and animal studies.
Garay J, Piazuelo MB, Lopez-Carrillo L, Leal YA, Majumdar S, Li L, Cruz-Rodriguez N, Serrano-Gomez SJ, Busso CS, Schneider BG, Delgado AG, Bravo LE, Crist AM, Meadows SM, Camargo MC, Wilson KT, Correa P, Zabaleta J
(2017) Oncotarget 8: 47076-47089
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Ethnic Groups, Gastric Mucosa, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genetic Association Studies, Helicobacter Infections, Humans, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasm Staging, Precancerous Conditions, Receptors, Cell Surface, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added June 29, 2017
Helicobacter pylori infection triggers a cascade of inflammatory stages that may lead to the appearance of non-atrophic gastritis, multifocal atrophic, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and cancer. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by binding to pathogens. Initial studies showed its deletion and loss of expression in a variety of tumors but the role of this gene in tumor development is not completely understood. Here, we examined the role of DMBT1 in gastric precancerous lesions in Caucasian, African American and Hispanic individuals as well as in the development of gastric pathology in a mouse model of H. pylori infection. We found that in 3 different populations, mucosal DMBT1 expression was significantly increased (2.5 fold) in individuals with dysplasia compared to multifocal atrophic gastritis without intestinal metaplasia; the increase was also observed in individuals with advanced gastritis and positive H. pylori infection. In our animal model, H. pylori infection of Dmbt1-/- mice resulted in significantly higher levels of gastritis, more extensive mucous metaplasia and reduced Il33 expression levels in the gastric mucosa compared to H. pylori-infected wild type mice. Our data in the animal model suggest that in response to H. pylori infection DMBT1 may mediate mucosal protection reducing the risk of developing gastric precancerous lesions. However, the increased expression in human gastric precancerous lesions points to a more complex role of DMBT1 in gastric carcinogenesis.
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15 MeSH Terms
Epidermis-Derived Semaphorin Promotes Dendrite Self-Avoidance by Regulating Dendrite-Substrate Adhesion in Drosophila Sensory Neurons.
Meltzer S, Yadav S, Lee J, Soba P, Younger SH, Jin P, Zhang W, Parrish J, Jan LY, Jan YN
(2016) Neuron 89: 741-55
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Cell Communication, Dendrites, Drosophila, Drosophila Proteins, Epidermis, Focal Adhesion Kinase 1, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Immunoprecipitation, Larva, Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 2, Molecular Biology, Multiprotein Complexes, Mutation, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Receptors, Cell Surface, Semaphorins, Sensory Receptor Cells, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added February 9, 2016
Precise patterning of dendritic arbors is critical for the wiring and function of neural circuits. Dendrite-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion ensures that the dendrites of Drosophila dendritic arborization (da) sensory neurons are properly restricted in a 2D space, and thereby facilitates contact-mediated dendritic self-avoidance and tiling. However, the mechanisms regulating dendrite-ECM adhesion in vivo are poorly understood. Here, we show that mutations in the semaphorin ligand sema-2b lead to a dramatic increase in self-crossing of dendrites due to defects in dendrite-ECM adhesion, resulting in a failure to confine dendrites to a 2D plane. Furthermore, we find that Sema-2b is secreted from the epidermis and signals through the Plexin B receptor in neighboring neurons. Importantly, we find that Sema-2b/PlexB genetically and physically interacts with TORC2 complex, Tricornered (Trc) kinase, and integrins. These results reveal a novel role for semaphorins in dendrite patterning and illustrate how epidermal-derived cues regulate neural circuit assembly.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide Association Studies Identify Genetic Loci Associated With Albuminuria in Diabetes.
Teumer A, Tin A, Sorice R, Gorski M, Yeo NC, Chu AY, Li M, Li Y, Mijatovic V, Ko YA, Taliun D, Luciani A, Chen MH, Yang Q, Foster MC, Olden M, Hiraki LT, Tayo BO, Fuchsberger C, Dieffenbach AK, Shuldiner AR, Smith AV, Zappa AM, Lupo A, Kollerits B, Ponte B, Stengel B, Krämer BK, Paulweber B, Mitchell BD, Hayward C, Helmer C, Meisinger C, Gieger C, Shaffer CM, Müller C, Langenberg C, Ackermann D, Siscovick D, DCCT/EDIC, Boerwinkle E, Kronenberg F, Ehret GB, Homuth G, Waeber G, Navis G, Gambaro G, Malerba G, Eiriksdottir G, Li G, Wichmann HE, Grallert H, Wallaschofski H, Völzke H, Brenner H, Kramer H, Mateo Leach I, Rudan I, Hillege HL, Beckmann JS, Lambert JC, Luan J, Zhao JH, Chalmers J, Coresh J, Denny JC, Butterbach K, Launer LJ, Ferrucci L, Kedenko L, Haun M, Metzger M, Woodward M, Hoffman MJ, Nauck M, Waldenberger M, Pruijm M, Bochud M, Rheinberger M, Verweij N, Wareham NJ, Endlich N, Soranzo N, Polasek O, van der Harst P, Pramstaller PP, Vollenweider P, Wild PS, Gansevoort RT, Rettig R, Biffar R, Carroll RJ, Katz R, Loos RJ, Hwang SJ, Coassin S, Bergmann S, Rosas SE, Stracke S, Harris TB, Corre T, Zeller T, Illig T, Aspelund T, Tanaka T, Lendeckel U, Völker U, Gudnason V, Chouraki V, Koenig W, Kutalik Z, O'Connell JR, Parsa A, Heid IM, Paterson AD, de Boer IH, Devuyst O, Lazar J, Endlich K, Susztak K, Tremblay J, Hamet P, Jacob HJ, Böger CA, Fox CS, Pattaro C, Köttgen A
(2016) Diabetes 65: 803-17
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Albuminuria, Animals, Cathepsin C, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Female, Gene Knockout Techniques, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Tubules, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Rats, Receptors, Cell Surface, Sulfotransferases, rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Elevated concentrations of albumin in the urine, albuminuria, are a hallmark of diabetic kidney disease and are associated with an increased risk for end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. To gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying albuminuria, we conducted meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies and independent replication in up to 5,825 individuals of European ancestry with diabetes and up to 46,061 without diabetes, followed by functional studies. Known associations of variants in CUBN, encoding cubilin, with the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were confirmed in the overall sample (P = 2.4 × 10(-10)). Gene-by-diabetes interactions were detected and confirmed for variants in HS6ST1 and near RAB38/CTSC. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at these loci demonstrated a genetic effect on UACR in individuals with but not without diabetes. The change in the average UACR per minor allele was 21% for HS6ST1 (P = 6.3 × 10(-7)) and 13% for RAB38/CTSC (P = 5.8 × 10(-7)). Experiments using streptozotocin-induced diabetic Rab38 knockout and control rats showed higher urinary albumin concentrations and reduced amounts of megalin and cubilin at the proximal tubule cell surface in Rab38 knockout versus control rats. Relative expression of RAB38 was higher in tubuli of patients with diabetic kidney disease compared with control subjects. The loci identified here confirm known pathways and highlight novel pathways influencing albuminuria.
© 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
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22 MeSH Terms
Cell Receptor-Basement Membrane Interactions in Health and Disease: A Kidney-Centric View.
Borza CM, Chen X, Zent R, Pozzi A
(2015) Curr Top Membr 76: 231-53
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basement Membrane, Epithelial Cells, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Diseases, Protein Binding, Receptors, Cell Surface
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential for tissue development, homeostasis, and response to injury. Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized ECMs that separate epithelial or endothelial cells from stromal components and interact with cells via cellular receptors, including integrins and discoidin domain receptors. Disruption of cell-BM interactions due to either injury or genetic defects in either the ECM components or cellular receptors often lead to irreversible tissue injury and loss of organ function. Animal models that lack specific BM components or receptors either globally or in selective tissues have been used to help with our understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell-BM interactions regulate organ function in physiological and pathological conditions. We review recently published works on animal models that explore how cell-BM interactions regulate kidney homeostasis in both health and disease.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms
HIV: Antiviral action countered by Nef.
Aiken C
(2015) Nature 526: 202-3
MeSH Terms: Animals, HIV-1, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Neoplasm Proteins, Receptors, Cell Surface, Virion, nef Gene Products, Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Added February 4, 2016
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9 MeSH Terms
Hepcidin-ferroportin axis controls toll-like receptor 4 dependent macrophage inflammatory responses in human atherosclerotic plaques.
Habib A, Polavarapu R, Karmali V, Guo L, Van Dam R, Cheng Q, Akahori H, Saeed O, Nakano M, Pachura K, Hong CC, Shin E, Kolodgie F, Virmani R, Finn AV
(2015) Atherosclerosis 241: 692-700
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD, Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic, Cation Transport Proteins, Foam Cells, Haptoglobins, Hemoglobins, Hepcidins, Humans, Inflammation, Iron, Lipopolysaccharides, Lipoproteins, LDL, Macrophages, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Male, Membrane Microdomains, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Receptors, Cell Surface, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptor 4, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added July 7, 2015
OBJECTIVES - Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is implicated in modulating inflammatory cytokines though its role in atherosclerosis remains uncertain. We have recently described a non-foam cell macrophage phenotype driven by ingestion of hemoglobin:haptoglobin complexes (HH), via the scavenger receptor CD163, characterized by reduced inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we examined the role of iron metabolism in modulating TLR4 signaling in these cells.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Areas in human atherosclerotic plaque with non-foam cell, CD163 positive macrophages demonstrated reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon-beta (INF-β) compared to foam cells. Human macrophages differentiated in hemoglobin:haptoglobin (HH) complexes expressed the CD163 positive non-foam cell phenotype and demonstrated significantly less TNF-α and INF-β compared to control macrophages when exposed to oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS stimulated expression of TNF-α and INF-β could be restored in HH macrophages by pretreatment with hepcidin, an endogenous suppressor of ferroportin1 (FPN), or by genetic suppression of FPN in macrophages derived from myeloid specific FPN knockout mice. LPS stimulated control macrophages demonstrated increase in TLR4 trafficking to lipid rafts; this response was suppressed in HH macrophages but was restored upon pretreatment with hepcidin. Using a pharmacologic hepcidin suppressor, we observed a decrease in cytokine expression and TLR4-lipid raft trafficking in LPS-stimulated in a murine macrophage model.
CONCLUSION - TLR4 dependent macrophage signaling is controlled via hepcidin-ferroportin1 axis by influencing TLR4-lipid raft interactions. Pharmacologic manipulation of iron metabolism may represent a promising approach to limiting TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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26 MeSH Terms
Cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, proliferative markers, cell signaling molecules, CD209, and decorin immunoreactivity in low-grade myxofibrosarcoma and myxoma.
Cates JM, Memoli VA, Gonzalez RS
(2015) Virchows Arch 467: 211-6
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Cycle Proteins, Decorin, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Fibrosarcoma, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Lectins, C-Type, Male, Middle Aged, Myxoma, Neoplasm Grading, Receptors, Cell Surface
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
The histologic differential diagnosis between intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma can be quite difficult in some cases. To identify a diagnostic immunohistochemical marker, we compared the staining profiles of 19 different antigens, including cell cycle proteins, apoptosis proteins, and proliferative markers, and selected other signaling and structural proteins in these two tumors. Ten cases each of intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma were stained with antibodies directed against apoptosis regulatory proteins (Bcl2, activated caspase-3, phospho-H2A.X, and cleaved PARP), cell cycle regulatory proteins (Rb1, Cyclin-A, CDKN1B, and Cdt1), proliferative markers (KI67, MCM2, phospho-histone H3, and geminin), cell signalling molecules (c-Myc, EGF, EGFR, PLA2G4A, and HSP90), a dendritic cell marker (CD209), and the extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin. Staining patterns of myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma were compared using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. For each potential diagnostic marker studied, the proportions of cases scored as positive on both dichotomous or ordinal scales were not significantly different between myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma. Myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma share a common immunophenotype for each of the markers studied. Distinction between these tumors is still predominantly based on morphologic criteria.
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18 MeSH Terms
Circulating microparticles in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies: characterization and associations.
Chaturvedi S, Cockrell E, Espinola R, Hsi L, Fulton S, Khan M, Li L, Fonseca F, Kundu S, McCrae KR
(2015) Thromb Res 135: 102-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Antibodies, Anticardiolipin, Antibodies, Antiphospholipid, Antigens, CD, Antiphospholipid Syndrome, Blood Platelets, Cadherins, Cell-Derived Microparticles, Endoglin, Endothelial Cells, Female, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Lipopolysaccharide Receptors, Male, Middle Aged, Partial Thromboplastin Time, Receptors, Cell Surface, Thromboplastin, Thrombosis, beta 2-Glycoprotein I
Show Abstract · Added August 1, 2015
The antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis and/or recurrent fetal loss in the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies. These antibodies cause activation of endothelial and other cell types leading to the release of microparticles with procoagulant and pro-inflammatory properties. The aims of this study were to characterize the levels of endothelial cell, monocyte or platelet derived, and tissue factor-bearing microparticles in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies, to determine the association of circulating microparticles with anticardiolipin and anti-β2-glycoprotein antibodies, and to define the cellular origin of microparticles that express tissue factor. Microparticle content within citrated blood from 47 patients with antiphospholipid antibodies and 144 healthy controls was analyzed within 2hours of venipuncture. Levels of Annexin-V, CD105 and CD144 (endothelial derived), CD41 (platelet derived) and tissue factor positive microparticles were significantly higher in patients than controls. Though levels of CD14 (monocyte-derived) microparticles in patient plasma were not significantly increased, increased levels of CD14 and tissue factor positive microparticles were observed in patients. Levels of microparticles that stained for CD105 and CD144 showed a positive correlation with IgG (R=0.60, p=0.006) and IgM anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (R=0.58, p=0.006). The elevation of endothelial and platelet derived microparticles in patients with antiphospholipid antibodies and their correlation with anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies suggests a chronic state of vascular cell activation in these individuals and an important role for β2-glycoprotein I in development of the pro-thrombotic state associated with antiphospholipid antibodies.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
The sweet spot: defining virus-sialic acid interactions.
Stencel-Baerenwald JE, Reiss K, Reiter DM, Stehle T, Dermody TS
(2014) Nat Rev Microbiol 12: 739-49
MeSH Terms: Animals, Binding Sites, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, N-Acetylneuraminic Acid, Polysaccharides, Receptors, Cell Surface, Receptors, Virus, Species Specificity, Virus Attachment, Virus Diseases, Viruses
Show Abstract · Added January 31, 2015
Viral infections are initiated by attachment of the virus to host cell surface receptors, including sialic acid-containing glycans. It is now possible to rapidly identify specific glycan receptors using glycan array screening, to define atomic-level structures of virus-glycan complexes and to alter the glycan-binding site to determine the function of glycan engagement in viral disease. This Review highlights general principles of virus-glycan interactions and provides specific examples of sialic acid binding by viruses with stalk-like attachment proteins, including influenza virus, reovirus, adenovirus and rotavirus. Understanding virus-glycan interactions is essential to combating viral infections and designing improved viral vectors for therapeutic applications.
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12 MeSH Terms