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The in vivo specificity of synaptic Gβ and Gγ subunits to the α adrenergic receptor at CNS synapses.
Yim YY, Betke KM, McDonald WH, Gilsbach R, Chen Y, Hyde K, Wang Q, Hein L, Hamm HE
(2019) Sci Rep 9: 1718
MeSH Terms: Animals, Central Nervous System, Epinephrine, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein gamma Subunits, Gene Knock-In Techniques, Mice, Proteomics, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Signal Transduction, Synapses
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
G proteins are major transducers of signals from G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). They are made up of α, β, and γ subunits, with 16 Gα, 5 Gβ and 12 Gγ subunits. Though much is known about the specificity of Gα subunits, the specificity of Gβγs activated by a given GPCR and that activate each effector in vivo is not known. Here, we examined the in vivo Gβγ specificity of presynaptic α-adrenergic receptors (αARs) in both adrenergic (auto-αARs) and non-adrenergic neurons (hetero-αARs) for the first time. With a quantitative MRM proteomic analysis of neuronal Gβ and Gγ subunits, and co-immunoprecipitation of tagged αARs from mouse models including transgenic FLAG-αARs and knock-in HA-αARs, we investigated the in vivo specificity of Gβ and Gγ subunits to auto-αARs and hetero-αARs activated with epinephrine to understand the role of Gβγ specificity in diverse physiological functions such as anesthetic sparing, and working memory enhancement. We detected Gβ, Gγ, Gγ, and Gγ with activated auto αARs, whereas we found Gβ and Gγ preferentially interacted with activated hetero-αARs. Further understanding of in vivo Gβγ specificity to various GPCRs offers new insights into the multiplicity of genes for Gβ and Gγ, and the mechanisms underlying GPCR signaling through Gβγ subunits.
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11 MeSH Terms
α-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Decreases Parabrachial Nucleus Excitatory Drive onto BNST CRF Neurons and Reduces Their Activity .
Fetterly TL, Basu A, Nabit BP, Awad E, Williford KM, Centanni SW, Matthews RT, Silberman Y, Winder DG
(2019) J Neurosci 39: 472-484
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists, Animals, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone, Female, Gene Expression, Genes, fos, Guanfacine, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neurons, Norepinephrine, Ovariectomy, Parabrachial Nucleus, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Protein Kinase C-delta, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Restraint, Physical, Septal Nuclei, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Stress contributes to numerous psychiatric disorders. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) signaling and CRF neurons in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) drive negative affective behaviors, thus agents that decrease activity of these cells may be of therapeutic interest. Here, we show that acute restraint stress increases cFos expression in CRF neurons in the mouse dorsal BNST, consistent with a role for these neurons in stress-related behaviors. We find that activation of α-adrenergic receptors (ARs) by the agonist guanfacine reduced cFos expression in these neurons both in stressed and unstressed conditions. Further, we find that α- and β-ARs differentially regulate excitatory drive onto these neurons. Pharmacological and channelrhodopsin-assisted mapping experiments suggest that α-ARs specifically reduce excitatory drive from parabrachial nucleus (PBN) afferents onto CRF neurons. Given that the α-AR is a G-linked GPCR, we assessed the impact of activating the G-coupled DREADD hM4Di in the PBN on restraint stress regulation of BNST CRF neurons. CNO activation of PBN hM4Di reduced stress-induced in BNST neurons. Further, using as an additional marker of BNST neuronal identity, we uncovered a female-specific upregulation of the coexpression of in BNST neurons following stress, which was prevented by ovariectomy. These findings show that stress activates BNST CRF neurons, and that α-AR activation suppresses the activity of these cells, at least in part by suppressing excitatory drive from PBN inputs onto CRF neurons. Stress is a major variable contributing to mood disorders. Here, we show that stress increases activation of BNST CRF neurons that drive negative affective behavior. We find that the clinically well tolerated α-AR agonist guanfacine reduces activity of these cells , and reduces excitatory PBN inputs onto these cells Additionally, we uncover a novel sex-dependent coexpression of with in female BNST neurons after stress, an effect abolished by ovariectomy. These results demonstrate input-specific interactions between norepinephrine and CRF, and point to an action by which guanfacine may reduce negative affective responses.
Copyright © 2019 the authors 0270-6474/19/390472-13$15.00/0.
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21 MeSH Terms
Dorsal BNST α-Adrenergic Receptors Produce HCN-Dependent Excitatory Actions That Initiate Anxiogenic Behaviors.
Harris NA, Isaac AT, Günther A, Merkel K, Melchior J, Xu M, Eguakun E, Perez R, Nabit BP, Flavin S, Gilsbach R, Shonesy B, Hein L, Abel T, Baumann A, Matthews R, Centanni SW, Winder DG
(2018) J Neurosci 38: 8922-8942
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists, Animals, Anxiety, Catecholamines, Female, Guanfacine, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Neurons, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Septal Nuclei, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Stress is a precipitating agent in neuropsychiatric disease and initiates relapse to drug-seeking behavior in addicted patients. Targeting the stress system in protracted abstinence from drugs of abuse with anxiolytics may be an effective treatment modality for substance use disorders. α-adrenergic receptors (α-ARs) in extended amygdala structures play key roles in dampening stress responses. Contrary to early thinking, α-ARs are expressed at non-noradrenergic sites in the brain. These non-noradrenergic α-ARs play important roles in stress responses, but their cellular mechanisms of action are unclear. In humans, the α-AR agonist guanfacine reduces overall craving and uncouples craving from stress, yet minimally affects relapse, potentially due to competing actions in the brain. Here, we show that heteroceptor α-ARs postsynaptically enhance dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBNST) neuronal activity in mice of both sexes. This effect is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels because inhibition of these channels is necessary and sufficient for excitatory actions. Finally, this excitatory action is mimicked by clozapine--oxide activation of the G-coupled DREADD hM4Di in dBNST neurons and its activation elicits anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Together, these data provide a framework for elucidating cell-specific actions of GPCR signaling and provide a potential mechanism whereby competing anxiogenic and anxiolytic actions of guanfacine may affect its clinical utility in the treatment of addiction. Stress affects the development of neuropsychiatric disorders including anxiety and addiction. Guanfacine is an α2A-adrenergic receptor (α2A-AR) agonist with actions in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) that produces antidepressant actions and uncouples stress from reward-related behaviors. Here, we show that guanfacine increases dorsal BNST neuronal activity through actions at postsynaptic α2A-ARs via a mechanism that involves hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated cation channels. This action is mimicked by activation of the designer receptor hM4Di expressed in the BNST, which also induces anxiety-like behaviors. Together, these data suggest that postsynaptic α2A-ARs in BNST have excitatory actions on BNST neurons and that these actions can be phenocopied by the so-called "inhibitory" DREADDs, suggesting that care must be taken regarding interpretation of data obtained with these tools.
Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/388923-21$15.00/0.
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15 MeSH Terms
α- and α-Adrenoceptors as Potential Targets for Dopamine and Dopamine Receptor Ligands.
Sánchez-Soto M, Casadó-Anguera V, Yano H, Bender BJ, Cai NS, Moreno E, Canela EI, Cortés A, Meiler J, Casadó V, Ferré S
(2018) Mol Neurobiol 55: 8438-8454
MeSH Terms: Adenylyl Cyclases, Animals, Cerebral Cortex, Clonidine, Dopamine, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, GTP-Binding Proteins, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Idazoxan, Ligands, Neostriatum, Norepinephrine, Phosphorylation, Quinpirole, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Receptors, Dopamine, Sheep, Tetrahydronaphthalenes
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
The poor norepinephrine innervation and high density of Gi/o-coupled α- and α-adrenoceptors in the striatum and the dense striatal dopamine innervation have prompted the possibility that dopamine could be an effective adrenoceptor ligand. Nevertheless, the reported adrenoceptor agonistic properties of dopamine are still inconclusive. In this study, we analyzed the binding of norepinephrine, dopamine, and several compounds reported as selective dopamine D-like receptor ligands, such as the D receptor agonist 7-OH-PIPAT and the D receptor agonist RO-105824, to α-adrenoceptors in cortical and striatal tissue, which express α-adrenoceptors and both α- and α-adrenoceptors, respectively. The affinity of dopamine for α-adrenoceptors was found to be similar to that for D-like and D-like receptors. Moreover, the exogenous dopamine receptor ligands also showed high affinity for α- and α-adrenoceptors. Their ability to activate Gi/o proteins through α- and α-adrenoceptors was also analyzed in transfected cells with bioluminescent resonance energy transfer techniques. The relative ligand potencies and efficacies were dependent on the Gi/o protein subtype. Furthermore, dopamine binding to α-adrenoceptors was functional, inducing changes in dynamic mass redistribution, adenylyl cyclase activity, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Binding events were further studied with computer modeling of ligand docking. Docking of dopamine at α- and α-adrenoceptors was nearly identical to its binding to the crystallized D receptor. Therefore, we provide conclusive evidence that α- and α-adrenoceptors are functional receptors for norepinephrine, dopamine, and other previously assumed selective D-like receptor ligands, which calls for revisiting previous studies with those ligands.
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MeSH Terms
Genetic variation in alpha2-adrenoreceptors and heart rate recovery after exercise.
Kohli U, Diedrich A, Kannankeril PJ, Muszkat M, Sofowora GG, Hahn MK, English BA, Blakely RD, Stein CM, Kurnik D
(2015) Physiol Genomics 47: 400-6
MeSH Terms: Adult, Catecholamines, Exercise, Female, Heart Rate, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-1
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. HRR is mediated by both parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic withdrawal and is highly heritable. We examined whether common genetic variants in adrenergic and cholinergic receptors and transporters affect HRR. In our study 126 healthy subjects (66 Caucasians, 56 African Americans) performed an 8 min step-wise bicycle exercise test with continuous computerized ECG recordings. We fitted an exponential curve to the postexercise R-R intervals for each subject to calculate the recovery constant (kr) as primary outcome. Secondary outcome was the root mean square residuals averaged over 1 min (RMS1min), a marker of parasympathetic tone. We used multiple linear regressions to determine the effect of functional candidate genetic variants in autonomic pathways (6 ADRA2A, 1 ADRA2B, 4 ADRA2C, 2 ADRB1, 3 ADRB2, 2 NET, 2 CHT, and 1 GRK5) on the outcomes before and after adjustment for potential confounders. Recovery constant was lower (indicating slower HRR) in ADRA2B 301-303 deletion carriers (n = 54, P = 0.01), explaining 3.6% of the interindividual variability in HRR. ADRA2A Asn251Lys, ADRA2C rs13118771, and ADRB1 Ser49Gly genotypes were associated with RMS1min. Genetic variability in adrenergic receptors may be associated with HRR after exercise. However, most of the interindividual variability in HRR remained unexplained by the variants examined. Noncandidate gene-driven approaches to study genetic contributions to HRR in larger cohorts will be of interest.
Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.
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11 MeSH Terms
Excitatory drive onto dopaminergic neurons in the rostral linear nucleus is enhanced by norepinephrine in an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent manner.
Williams MA, Li C, Kash TL, Matthews RT, Winder DG
(2014) Neuropharmacology 86: 116-24
MeSH Terms: Animals, Dopaminergic Neurons, Electric Capacitance, Electric Impedance, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Glutamic Acid, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Male, Membrane Potentials, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Miniature Postsynaptic Potentials, Norepinephrine, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Raphe Nuclei, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-1, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase, Ventral Tegmental Area
Show Abstract · Added August 21, 2014
Dopaminergic innervation of the extended amygdala regulates anxiety-like behavior and stress responsivity. A portion of this dopamine input arises from dopamine neurons located in the ventral lateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and rostral (RLi) and caudal linear nuclei of the raphe (CLi). These neurons receive substantial norepinephrine input, which may prime them for involvement in stress responses. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, we explored the physiology and responsiveness to norepinephrine of these neurons. We find that RLi dopamine neurons differ from VTA dopamine neurons with respect to membrane resistance, capacitance and the hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih. Further, we found that norepinephrine increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) on RLi dopamine neurons. This effect was mediated through the α1 adrenergic receptor (AR), as the actions of norepinephrine were mimicked by the α1-AR agonist methoxamine and blocked by the α1-AR antagonist prazosin. This action of norepinephrine on sEPSCs was transient, as it did not persist in the presence of prazosin. Methoxamine also increased the frequency of miniature EPSCs, indicating that the α1-AR action on glutamatergic transmission likely has a presynaptic mechanism. There was also a modest decrease in sEPSC frequency with the application of the α2-AR agonist UK-14,304. These studies illustrate a potential mechanism through which norepinephrine could recruit the activity of this population of dopaminergic neurons.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
α(2A)-adrenergic receptors filter parabrachial inputs to the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis.
Flavin SA, Matthews RT, Wang Q, Muly EC, Winder DG
(2014) J Neurosci 34: 9319-31
MeSH Terms: Animals, Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neural Pathways, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Septal Nuclei, Solitary Nucleus
Show Abstract · Added August 21, 2014
α2-adrenergic receptors (AR) within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) reduce stress-reward interactions in rodent models. In addition to their roles as autoreceptors, BNST α(2A)-ARs suppress glutamatergic transmission. One prominent glutamatergic input to the BNST originates from the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and consists of asymmetric axosomatic synapses containing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vGluT2. Here we provide immunoelectron microscopic data showing that many asymmetric axosomatic synapses in the BNST contain α(2A)-ARs. Further, we examined optically evoked glutamate release ex vivo in BNST from mice with virally delivered channelrhodopsin2 (ChR2) expression in PBN. In BNST from these animals, ChR2 partially colocalized with CGRP, and activation generated EPSCs in dorsal anterolateral BNST neurons that elicited two cell-type-specific outcomes: (1) feedforward inhibition or (2) an EPSP that elicited firing. We found that the α(2A)-AR agonist guanfacine selectively inhibited this PBN input to the BNST, preferentially reducing the excitatory response in ex vivo mouse brain slices. To begin to assess the overall impact of α(2A)-AR control of this PBN input on BNST excitatory transmission, we used a Thy1-COP4 mouse line with little postsynaptic ChR2 expression nor colocalization of ChR2 with CGRP in the BNST. In slices from these mice, we found that guanfacine enhanced, rather than suppressed, optogenetically initiated excitatory drive in BNST. Thus, our study reveals distinct actions of PBN afferents within the BNST and suggests that α(2A)-AR agonists may filter excitatory transmission in the BNST by inhibiting a component of the PBN input while enhancing the actions of other inputs.
Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349319-13$15.00/0.
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9 MeSH Terms
Yohimbine depresses excitatory transmission in BNST and impairs extinction of cocaine place preference through orexin-dependent, norepinephrine-independent processes.
Conrad KL, Davis AR, Silberman Y, Sheffler DJ, Shields AD, Saleh SA, Sen N, Matthies HJ, Javitch JA, Lindsley CW, Winder DG
(2012) Neuropsychopharmacology 37: 2253-66
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Antagonists, Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Antagonists, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Cocaine, Drug-Seeking Behavior, Extinction, Psychological, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Morpholines, Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitter Agents, Norepinephrine, Norepinephrine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Orexin Receptors, Orexins, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Reboxetine, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone, Receptors, Neuropeptide, Reward, Septal Nuclei, Synaptic Transmission, Yohimbine
Show Abstract · Added September 17, 2013
The alpha2 adrenergic receptor (α(2)-AR) antagonist yohimbine is a widely used tool for the study of anxiogenesis and stress-induced drug-seeking behavior. We previously demonstrated that yohimbine paradoxically depresses excitatory transmission in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a region critical to the integration of stress and reward pathways, and produces an impairment of extinction of cocaine-conditioned place preference (cocaine-CPP) independent of α(2)-AR signaling. Recent studies show yohimbine-induced drug-seeking behavior is attenuated by orexin receptor 1 (OX(1)R) antagonists. Moreover, yohimbine-induced cocaine-seeking behavior is BNST-dependent. Here, we investigated yohimbine-orexin interactions. Our results demonstrate yohimbine-induced depression of excitatory transmission in the BNST is unaffected by alpha1-AR and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1 (CRFR(1)) antagonists, but is (1) blocked by OxR antagonists and (2) absent in brain slices from orexin knockout mice. Although the actions of yohimbine were not mimicked by the norepinephrine transporter blocker reboxetine, they were by exogenously applied orexin A. We find that, as with yohimbine, orexin A depression of excitatory transmission in BNST is OX(1)R-dependent. Finally, we find these ex vivo effects are paralleled in vivo, as yohimbine-induced impairment of cocaine-CPP extinction is blocked by a systemically administered OX(1)R antagonist. These data highlight a new mechanism for orexin on excitatory anxiety circuits and demonstrate that some of the actions of yohimbine may be directly dependent upon orexin signaling and independent of norepinephrine and CRF in the BNST.
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28 MeSH Terms
Genetic variations in the α(2A)-adrenoreceptor are associated with blood pressure response to the agonist dexmedetomidine.
Kurnik D, Muszkat M, Li C, Sofowora GG, Friedman EA, Scheinin M, Wood AJ, Stein CM
(2011) Circ Cardiovasc Genet 4: 179-87
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists, Adult, Alleles, Area Under Curve, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular System, Dexmedetomidine, Female, Genotype, Haplotypes, Heart Rate, Homozygote, Humans, Injections, Intravenous, Male, Middle Aged, Norepinephrine, Placebo Effect, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Single-Blind Method
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - α(2A)-Adrenoceptors (α(2A)-ARs) have important roles in sympathetic cardiovascular regulation. Variants of ADRA2A affect gene transcription and expression and are associated with insulin release and risk for type 2 diabetes. We examined whether ADRA2A variants are also associated with cardiovascular responses to the selective α(2)-AR-agonist dexmedetomidine.
METHODS AND RESULTS - Seventy-three healthy subjects participated in a placebo-controlled, single-blind study. After 3 infusions of placebo, subjects received 3 incremental infusions of dexmedetomidine (cumulative dose, 0.4 μg/kg). Primary outcomes were changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations, measured as difference of the area-under-the-curve during placebo and dexmedetomidine infusions (ΔAUC). We used multiple linear regression analysis to examine the associations between 9 ADRA2A tagging variants and 5 inferred haplotypes and ΔAUC after adjustment for covariates. Homozygous carriers of rs553668 and the corresponding haplotype 4, previously associated with increased α(2A)-AR expression, had a 2.2-fold greater decrease in AUC(SBP) after dexmedetomidine (adjusted P=0.006); similarly, the maximum decrease in SBP was 24.7±8.1 mm Hg compared with 13.6±5.9 mm Hg in carriers of the wild-type allele (P=0.007). Carriers of haplotype 3, previously associated with reduced α(2A)-AR expression, had a 44% smaller decrease in AUC(SBP) (P=0.013). Haplotype information significantly improved the model predicting the decrease in SBP (P<0.001). There were similar but nonsignificant trends for diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. Genotypes were not significantly associated with norepinephrine responses.
CONCLUSIONS - Common ADRA2A variants are associated with the hypotensive response to dexmedetomidine. Effects of specific variants/haplotypes in vivo are compatible with their known effects on gene expression in vitro.
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20 MeSH Terms
Independent regulation of α1 and α2 adrenergic receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in vivo.
Muszkat M, Kurnik D, Sofowora GG, Wood AJ, Stein CM
(2011) J Hypertens 29: 251-6
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Agonists, Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists, Adult, Dexmedetomidine, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Hand, Humans, Male, Models, Cardiovascular, Phenylephrine, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-1, Receptors, Adrenergic, alpha-2, Signal Transduction, Vasoconstriction, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - Vascular α1 and α2 adrenergic receptors mediate vasoconstriction and are major determinants of peripheral vascular tone. There is a wide variability in vasoconstrictor sensitivity to α1 and α2 adrenergic receptor agonists among individuals. In previous studies, this variability was not explained by identified α1 and α2 adrenergic receptor genetic variants. Thus, we hypothesized that adrenergic vasoconstrictor sensitivity is determined by shared constrictor mechanisms downstream of the individual receptors and that α1 and α2 adrenergic receptor-mediated vasoconstrictor sensitivity would therefore be correlated.
METHODS - Dorsal hand vein responses to increasing doses of the α1 adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine (12-12 000 ng/min) and the α2 adrenergic receptor agonist dexmedetomidine (0.01-100 ng/min) were measured in healthy individuals using a linear variable differential transformer. From individual dose-response curves, we calculated the dose of phenylephrine and dexmedetomidine that produced 50% (ED50) of maximum venoconstriction (Emax) for each patient. We examined the correlation between phenylephrine and dexmedetomidine ED50 and Emax before and after adjustment for covariates (age, sex, ethnicity, BMI, blood pressure, heart rate, and baseline plasma norepinephrine concentrations).
RESULTS - In 62 patients (36 men, 34 African-American, 28 whites), the median ED50 for dexmedetomidine was 1.32 ng/min [interquartile range (IQR) 0.45-5.37 ng/min] and for phenylephrine 177.8 ng/min (IQR 40.7-436.5 ng/min). The Emax for phenylephrine was 90.8% (82.2-99.6%) and for dexmedetomidine 80.0% (64.7-95.2%). There was no correlation between individual sensitivities (ED50) to phenylephrine and dexmedetomidine, before and after adjustment for covariates (P > 0.30).
CONCLUSION - Both phenylephrine and dexmedetomidine produce strong venoconstriction in the dorsal hand vein; however, there is no significant correlation between vascular sensitivity to an α1 and α2 adrenergic receptor agonist. These findings suggest the independent regulation of vascular α1 and α2 adrenergic receptor-mediated responses.
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16 MeSH Terms