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Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons.
Cohen MR, Johnson WM, Pilat JM, Kiselar J, DeFrancesco-Lisowitz A, Zigmond RE, Moiseenkova-Bell VY
(2015) Mol Cell Biol 35: 4238-52
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium, Calcium Channels, Cell Line, Tumor, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, HEK293 Cells, Humans, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Nerve Growth Factor, Neurites, Neurogenesis, Neurons, PC12 Cells, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphorylation, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering, Rats, Receptor, trkA, TRPV Cation Channels, rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 24, 2017
Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca(2+)-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function.
Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
The biological functions and signaling mechanisms of the p75 neurotrophin receptor.
Kraemer BR, Yoon SO, Carter BD
(2014) Handb Exp Pharmacol 220: 121-64
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport, Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Cycle, Cell Survival, Humans, JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Myelin Sheath, NF-kappa B, Neuronal Plasticity, Protein Precursors, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor, Receptor, trkA, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added January 22, 2015
The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) regulates a wide range of cellular functions, including programmed cell death, axonal growth and degeneration, cell proliferation, myelination, and synaptic plasticity. The multiplicity of cellular functions governed by the receptor arises from the variety of ligands and co-receptors which associate with p75(NTR) and regulate its signaling. P75(NTR) promotes survival through interactions with Trk receptors, inhibits axonal regeneration via partnerships with Nogo receptor (Nogo-R) and Lingo-1, and promotes apoptosis through association with Sortilin. Signals downstream of these interactions are further modulated through regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of p75(NTR) and by interactions with numerous cytosolic partners. In this chapter, we discuss the intricate signaling mechanisms of p75(NTR), emphasizing how these signals are differentially regulated to mediate these diverse cellular functions.
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14 MeSH Terms
Heat shock protein 90 inhibition depletes TrkA levels and signaling in human acute leukemia cells.
Rao R, Nalluri S, Fiskus W, Balusu R, Joshi A, Mudunuru U, Buckley KM, Robbins K, Ustun C, Reuther GW, Bhalla KN
(2010) Mol Cancer Ther 9: 2232-42
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzoquinones, Bone Marrow Cells, Carbazoles, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Tumor, Coculture Techniques, HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins, Humans, Indole Alkaloids, Lactams, Macrocyclic, Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, Nerve Growth Factor, PC12 Cells, Phosphorylation, Polyubiquitin, Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex, Rats, Receptor, trkA, Signal Transduction, Stromal Cells, Ubiquitination
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2013
Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces autophosphorylation and downstream progrowth and prosurvival signaling from the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkA. Overexpression or activating mutation of TrkA has been described in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In the present study, we show the chaperone association of TrkA with heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) and the inhibitory effect of the hsp90 inhibitor, 17-DMAG, on TrkA levels and signaling in cultured and primary myeloid leukemia cells. Treatment with 17-DMAG disrupted the binding of TrkA with hsp90 and the cochaperone cdc37, resulting in polyubiquitylation, proteasomal degradation, and depletion of TrkA. Exposure to 17-DMAG inhibited NGF-induced p-TrkA, p-AKT, and p-ERK1/2 levels, as well as induced apoptosis of K562, 32D cells with ectopic expression of wild-type TrkA or the constitutively active mutant Delta TrkA, and of primary myeloid leukemia cells. Additionally, 17-DMAG treatment inhibited NGF-induced neurite formation in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells. Cotreatment with 17-DMAG and K-252a, an inhibitor of TrkA-mediated signaling, induced synergistic loss of viability of cultured and primary myeloid leukemia cells. These findings show that TrkA is an hsp90 client protein, and inhibition of hsp90 depletes TrkA and its progrowth and prosurvival signaling in myeloid leukemia cells. These findings also support further evaluation of the combined activity of an hsp90 inhibitor and TrkA antagonist against myeloid leukemia cells.
(c) 2010 AACR.
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22 MeSH Terms
Kinase expression and chromosomal rearrangements in papillary thyroid cancer tissues: investigations at the molecular and microscopic levels.
Weier HU, Kwan J, Lu CM, Ito Y, Wang M, Baumgartner A, Hayward SW, Weier JF, Zitzelsberger HF
(2009) J Physiol Pharmacol 60 Suppl 4: 47-55
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinoma, Papillary, Cell Line, Cell Transplantation, Chernobyl Nuclear Accident, Chromosome Aberrations, Chromosomes, Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial, Cloning, Molecular, DNA Probes, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Karyotyping, Mice, Protein Kinases, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptor, trkA, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Thyroid Neoplasms, Translocation, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Structural chromosome aberrations are known hallmarks of many solid tumors. In the papillary form of thyroid cancer (PTC), for example, activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) genes, ret or the neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type I (NTRK1) by intra- or interchromosomal rearrangements have been suggested as a cause of the disease. The 1986 accident at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl, Ukraine, led to the uncontrolled release of high levels of radioisotopes. Ten years later, the incidence of childhood papillary thyroid cancer (chPTC) near Chernobyl had risen by two orders of magnitude. Tumors removed from some of these patients showed aberrant expression of the ret RTK gene due to a ret/PTC1 or ret/PTC3 rearrangement involving chromosome 10. However, many cultured chPTC cells show a normal G-banded karyotype and no ret rearrangement. We hypothesize that the "ret-negative" tumors inappropriately express a different oncogene or have lost function of a tumor suppressor as a result of chromosomal rearrangements, and decided to apply molecular and cytogenetic methods to search for potentially oncogenic chromosomal rearrangements in Chernobyl chPTC cases. Knowledge of the kind of genetic alterations may facilitate the early detection and staging of chPTC as well as provide guidance for therapeutic intervention.
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Cholinergic neurons of mouse intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain noradrenergic enzymes, norepinephrine transporters, and the neurotrophin receptors tropomyosin-related kinase A and p75.
Hoard JL, Hoover DB, Mabe AM, Blakely RD, Feng N, Paolocci N
(2008) Neuroscience 156: 129-42
MeSH Terms: Acetylcholine, Animals, Autonomic Pathways, Dopamine beta-Hydroxylase, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Ganglia, Parasympathetic, Heart, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Microscopy, Confocal, Neurons, Norepinephrine, Norepinephrine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Phenotype, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor, Receptor, trkA, Stellate Ganglion, Synaptic Transmission, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase, Vesicular Acetylcholine Transport Proteins, Vesicular Monoamine Transport Proteins
Show Abstract · Added July 10, 2013
Half of the cholinergic neurons of human and primate intrinsic cardiac ganglia (ICG) have a dual cholinergic/noradrenergic phenotype. Likewise, a large subpopulation of cholinergic neurons of the mouse heart expresses enzymes needed for synthesis of norepinephrine (NE), but they lack the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) required for catecholamine storage. In the present study, we determined the full scope of noradrenergic properties (i.e. synthetic enzymes and transporters) expressed by cholinergic neurons of mouse ICG, estimated the relative abundance of neurons expressing different elements of the noradrenergic phenotype, and evaluated the colocalization of cholinergic and noradrenergic markers in atrial nerve fibers. Stellate ganglia were used as a positive control for noradrenergic markers. Using fluorescence immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we found that about 30% of cholinergic cell bodies contained tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), including the activated form that is phosphorylated at Ser-40 (pSer40 TH). Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) and norepinephrine transporter (NET) were present in all cholinergic somata, indicating a wider capability for dopamine metabolism and catecholamine uptake. Yet, cholinergic somata lacked VMAT2, precluding the potential for NE storage and vesicular release. In contrast to cholinergic somata, cardiac nerve fibers rarely showed colocalization of cholinergic and noradrenergic markers. Instead, these labels were closely apposed but clearly distinct from each other. Since cholinergic somata expressed several noradrenergic proteins, we questioned whether these neurons might also contain trophic factor receptors typical of noradrenergic neurons. Indeed, we found that all cholinergic cell bodies of mouse ICG, like noradrenergic cell bodies of the stellate ganglia, contained both tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) and p75 neurotrophin receptors. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that mouse intrinsic cardiac neurons (ICNs), like those of humans, have a complex neurochemical phenotype that goes beyond the classical view of cardiac parasympathetic neurons. They also suggest that neurotrophins and local NE synthesis might have important effects on neurons of the mouse ICG.
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23 MeSH Terms
P75 neurotrophin receptor regulates expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1.
Mirnics ZK, Yan C, Portugal C, Kim TW, Saragovi HU, Sisodia SS, Mirnics K, Schor NF
(2005) Neurobiol Dis 20: 969-85
MeSH Terms: Alzheimer Disease, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Binding Sites, Brain, CD56 Antigen, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Nerve Growth Factor, Neurons, PC12 Cells, Palmitic Acid, Presenilin-1, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Rats, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor, Receptor, trkA, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Our recent transcriptome profiling studies suggest that presenilin 1 (PS1) regulates expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (Ncam1) through p75 neurotrophin receptor. To better understand regulation of Ncam1 transcript and protein levels by p75, we performed a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments. The combined results suggest that p75 receptor is required for both resting and NGF-induced Ncam1 expression. Activation of TrkA receptors alone does not upregulate Ncam1. The normal Ncam1 expression depends on the relative ratio of TrkA and p75 receptors, and p75 extracellular domain is necessary for baseline Ncam1 expression. NGF-induced Ncam1 expression is dependent on the presence of an intact palmitoylation site within p75 receptor. Finally, we show that the expression of Ncam1 is altered in brains of two transgenic mouse lines that express familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD)-linked PS1 variants, suggesting that expression of dominantly inherited mutant PS1 genes interferes with the normal Ncam1 expression via the p75 signaling pathway.
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24 MeSH Terms
The p75 neurotrophin receptor: multiple interactors and numerous functions.
Gentry JJ, Barker PA, Carter BD
(2004) Prog Brain Res 146: 25-39
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Carrier Proteins, Cell Survival, GTP-Binding Proteins, Myelin Sheath, Nerve Growth Factors, Neurites, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor, Receptor, trkA, Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR), is involved in a diverse array of cellular responses, including apoptosis, neurite outgrowth and myelination. Stimulation of p75NTR with neurotrophin can activate multiple downstream signals, including the small GTP binding protein Rac, the transcription factor NF-kappa B and the stress activated kinase, JNK. How these signals are generated and regulated to produce a specific cellular effect has yet to be fully elucidated. A number of proteins have recently been shown to interact with the intracellular domain of p75NTR. Here, we review these p75NTR interacting factors and the current evidence as to how they contribute to the functional effects of p75NTR activation.
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12 MeSH Terms
Death of oligodendrocytes mediated by the interaction of nerve growth factor with its receptor p75.
Casaccia-Bonnefil P, Carter BD, Dobrowsky RT, Chao MV
(1996) Nature 383: 716-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases, Cells, Cultured, Ceramides, Cerebral Cortex, Enzyme Activation, JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Nerve Growth Factors, Oligodendroglia, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Rats, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor, Receptor, trkA, Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Members of the nerve growth factor (NGF) family promote the survival of neurons during development. NGF specifically activates the receptor trkA, initiating a signal transduction cascade which ultimately blocks cell death. Here we show that NGF can have the opposite effect, inducing the death of mature oligodendrocytes cultured from postnatal rat cerebral cortex. This effect was highly specific, because NGF had no effect on oligodendrocyte precursors and astrocytes. Other neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) did not induce cell death. NGF binding to mature oligodendrocytes expressing the p75 neurotrophin receptor, but not trkA, resulted in a sustained increase of intracellular ceramide and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) activity, which are thought to participate in a signal transduction pathway leading to cell death. Taken together, these results indicate that NGF has the ability to promote cell death in specific cell types through a ligand-dependent signalling mechanism involving the p75 neurotrophin receptor.
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18 MeSH Terms
Selective activation of NF-kappa B by nerve growth factor through the neurotrophin receptor p75.
Carter BD, Kaltschmidt C, Kaltschmidt B, Offenhäuser N, Böhm-Matthaei R, Baeuerle PA, Barde YA
(1996) Science 272: 542-5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Sequence, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Cell Nucleus, Cells, Cultured, DNA, L Cells (Cell Line), Mice, Molecular Sequence Data, NF-kappa B, Nerve Growth Factors, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurotrophin 3, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Rats, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptor, Nerve Growth Factor, Receptor, trkA, Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor, Schwann Cells, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) selectively bind to distinct members of the Trk family of tyrosine kinase receptors, but all three bind with similar affinities to the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR). The biological significance of neurotrophin binding to p75NTR in cells that also express Trk receptors has been difficult to ascertain. In the absence of TrkA, NGF binding to p75NGR activated the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) in rat Schwann cells. This activation was not observed in Schwann cells isolated from mice that lacked p75NTR. The effect was selective for NGF; NF-kappa B was not activated by BDNF or NT-3.
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21 MeSH Terms
Structure and ligand recognition of the phosphotyrosine binding domain of Shc.
Zhou MM, Ravichandran KS, Olejniczak EF, Petros AM, Meadows RP, Sattler M, Harlan JE, Wade WS, Burakoff SJ, Fesik SW
(1995) Nature 378: 584-92
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport, Amino Acid Sequence, Binding Sites, Blood Proteins, Ligands, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Peptide Fragments, Phospholipids, Phosphopeptides, Phosphoproteins, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Conformation, Protein Structure, Secondary, Proteins, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptor, trkA, Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor, Shc Signaling Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transduction, src Homology Domains
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain of Shc complexed to a phosphopeptide reveals an alternative means of recognizing tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. Unlike in SH2 domains, the phosphopeptide forms an antiparallel beta-strand with a beta-sheet of the protein, interacts with a hydrophobic pocket through the (pY-5) residue, and adopts a beta-turn. The PTB domain is structurally similar to pleckstrin homology domains (a beta-sandwich capped by an alpha-helix) and binds to acidic phospholipids, suggesting a possible role in membrane localization.
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24 MeSH Terms