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Dynamics of Zebrafish Heart Regeneration Using an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS Approach.
Ma D, Tu C, Sheng Q, Yang Y, Kan Z, Guo Y, Shyr Y, Scott IC, Lou X
(2018) J Proteome Res 17: 1300-1308
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Fish Proteins, Gene Ontology, Heart Injuries, Heart Ventricles, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Molecular Sequence Annotation, Myocardium, Proteomics, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Regeneration, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Failure to properly repair damaged due to myocardial infarction is a major cause of heart failure. In contrast with adult mammals, zebrafish hearts show remarkable regenerative capabilities after substantial damage. To characterize protein dynamics during heart regeneration, we employed an HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (mass spectrometry) approach. Myocardium tissues were taken from sham-operated fish and ventricle-resected sample at three different time points (2, 7, and 14 days); dynamics of protein expression were analyzed by an ion-current-based quantitative platform. More than 2000 protein groups were quantified in all 16 experiments. Two hundred and nine heart-regeneration-related protein groups were quantified and clustered into six time-course patterns. Functional analysis indicated that multiple molecular function and metabolic pathways were involved in heart regeneration. Interestingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that P53 signaling was inhibited during the heart regeneration, which was further verified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). In summary, we applied systematic proteomics analysis on regenerating zebrafish heart, uncovered the dynamics of regenerative genes expression and regulatory pathways, and provided invaluable insight into design regenerative-based strategies in human hearts.
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15 MeSH Terms
Rhinovirus Viremia in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Lu X, Schneider E, Jain S, Bramley AM, Hymas W, Stockmann C, Ampofo K, Arnold SR, Williams DJ, Self WH, Patel A, Chappell JD, Grijalva CG, Anderson EJ, Wunderink RG, McCullers JA, Edwards KM, Pavia AT, Erdman DD
(2017) J Infect Dis 216: 1104-1111
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Viral, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Rhinovirus, Viremia
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).
Methods - Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing.
Results - Overall, 57 of 570 (10%) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged <10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2%). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8%), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2%). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia.
Conclusions - More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
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A novel real-time RT-PCR assay for influenza C tested in Peruvian children.
Howard LM, Johnson M, Gil AI, Pekosz A, Griffin MR, Edwards KM, Lanata CF, Grijalva CG, Williams JV, RESPIRA-PERU Group
(2017) J Clin Virol 96: 12-16
MeSH Terms: Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Infant, Influenza, Human, Influenzavirus C, Male, Molecular Diagnostic Techniques, Peru, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sensitivity and Specificity
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Influenza C virus (ICV) is associated with acute respiratory illness. Yet ICV remains under recognized, with most previous studies using only culture to identify cases.
OBJECTIVES - To develop a sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR assay for ICV that allows for rapid and accurate detection in a clinical or research setting.
STUDY DESIGN - Multiple ICV sequences obtained from GenBank were analyzed, including 141 hemagglutinin-esterase (HE), 106 matrix (M), and 97 nucleoprotein (NP) sequences. Primers and probes were designed based on conserved regions. Multiple primer-probe sets were tested against multiple ICV strains.
RESULTS - The ICV M and NP genes offered the most conserved sequence regions. Primers and probes based on newer sequence data offered enhanced detection of ICV, especially for low titer specimens. An NP-targeted assay yielded the best performance and was capable of detecting 10-100 RNA copies per reaction. The NP assay detected multiple clinical isolates of ICV collected in a field epidemiology study conducted in Peru.
CONCLUSIONS - We report a new real-time RT-PCR assay for ICV with high sensitivity and specificity.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Loss of SPRR3 in ApoE-/- mice leads to atheroma vulnerability through Akt dependent and independent effects in VSMCs.
Lietman CD, Segedy AK, Li B, Fazio S, Atkinson JB, Linton MF, Young PP
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0184620
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apolipoproteins E, Cornified Envelope Proline-Rich Proteins, Female, Fibronectins, Immunoblotting, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Smooth, Vascular, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) represent important modulators of plaque stability in advanced lesions. We previously reported that loss of small proline-rich repeat protein 3 (Sprr3), leads to VSMC apoptosis in a PI3K/Akt-dependent manner and accelerates lesion progression. Here, we investigated the role of Sprr3 in modulating plaque stability in hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice. We show that loss of Sprr3 increased necrotic core size and reduced cap collagen content of atheromas in brachiocephalic arteries with evidence of plaque rupture and development of intraluminal thrombi. Moreover, Sprr3-/-ApoE-/- mice developed advanced coronary artery lesions accompanied by intraplaque hemorrhage and left ventricle microinfarcts. SPRR3 is known to reduce VSMC survival in lesions by promoting their apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrated that Sprr3-/- VSMCs displayed reduced expression of procollagen in a PI3K/Akt dependent manner. SPRR3 loss also increased MMP gelatinase activity in lesions, and increased MMP2 expression, migration and contraction of VSMCs independently of PI3K/Akt. Consequently, Sprr3 represents the first described VSMC modulator of each of the critical features of cap stability, including VSMC numbers, collagen type I synthesis, and protease activity through Akt dependent and independent pathways.
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Estimating relative mitochondrial DNA copy number using high throughput sequencing data.
Zhang P, Lehmann BD, Samuels DC, Zhao S, Zhao YY, Shyr Y, Guo Y
(2017) Genomics 109: 457-462
MeSH Terms: Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Computational Biology, DNA Copy Number Variations, DNA, Mitochondrial, Data Mining, Databases, Genetic, Female, Genes, Essential, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Mitochondria, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Whole Exome Sequencing
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
We hypothesize that the relative mitochondria copy number (MTCN) can be estimated by comparing the abundance of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA reads using high throughput sequencing data. To test this hypothesis, we examined relative MTCN across 13 breast cancer cell lines using the RT-PCR based NovaQUANT Human Mitochondrial to Nuclear DNA Ratio Kit as the gold standard. Six distinct computational approaches were used to estimate the relative MTCN in order to compare to the RT-PCR measurements. The results demonstrate that relative MTCN correlates well with the RT-PCR measurements using exome sequencing data, but not RNA-seq data. Through analysis of copy number variants (CNVs) in The Cancer Genome Atlas, we show that the two nuclear genes used in the NovaQUANT assay to represent the nuclear genome often experience CNVs in tumor cells, questioning the accuracy of this gold-standard method when it is applied to tumor cells.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Prominin-1 Is a Novel Regulator of Autophagy in the Human Retinal Pigment Epithelium.
Bhattacharya S, Yin J, Winborn CS, Zhang Q, Yue J, Chaum E
(2017) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 58: 2366-2387
MeSH Terms: AC133 Antigen, Adult, Aged, Animals, Autophagy, Blotting, Western, Cells, Cultured, Female, Flow Cytometry, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Immunoprecipitation, Macular Degeneration, Male, Microscopy, Confocal, Middle Aged, RNA, Rabbits, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Retinal Pigment Epithelium, Signal Transduction, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added June 11, 2018
Purpose - Prominin-1 (Prom1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is expressed in stem cell lineages, and has recently been implicated in cancer stem cell survival. Mutations in the Prom1 gene have been shown to disrupt photoreceptor disk morphogenesis and cause an autosomal dominant form of Stargardt-like macular dystrophy (STGD4). Despite the apparent structural role of Prom1 in photoreceptors, its role in other cells of the retina is unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of Prom1 in the highly metabolically active cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE).
Methods - Lentiviral siRNA and the genome editing CRISPR/Cas9 system were used to knockout Prom1 in primary RPE and ARPE-19 cells, respectively. Western blotting, confocal microscopy, and flow sight imaging cytometry assays were used to quantify autophagy flux. Immunoprecipitation was used to detect Prom1 interacting proteins.
Results - Our studies demonstrate that Prom1 is primarily a cytosolic protein in the RPE. Stress signals and physiological aging robustly increase autophagy with concomitant upregulation of Prom1 expression. Knockout of Prom1 increased mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling, decreased autophagosome trafficking to the lysosome, increased p62 accumulation, and inhibited autophagic puncta induced by activators of autophagy. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of Prom1 inhibited mTORC1 and mTORC2 activities, and potentiated autophagy flux. Through interactions with p62 and HDAC6, Prom1 regulates autophagosome maturation and trafficking, suggesting a new cytoplasmic role of Prom1 in RPE function.
Conclusions - Our results demonstrate that Prom1 plays a key role in the regulation of autophagy via upstream suppression of mTOR signaling and also acting as a component of a macromolecular scaffold involving p62 and HDAC6.
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A signalling cascade of IL-33 to IL-13 regulates metaplasia in the mouse stomach.
Petersen CP, Meyer AR, De Salvo C, Choi E, Schlegel C, Petersen A, Engevik AC, Prasad N, Levy SE, Peebles RS, Pizarro TT, Goldenring JR
(2018) Gut 67: 805-817
MeSH Terms: Animals, Flow Cytometry, Gastric Mucosa, Immunohistochemistry, Interleukin-13, Interleukin-33, Macrophages, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Interleukin, Signal Transduction, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) are associated with the progression of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in the stomach. However, the precise mechanism(s) and critical mediators that induce SPEM are unknown.
DESIGN - To determine candidate genes important in these processes, macrophages from the stomach corpus of mice with SPEM (DMP-777-treated) or advanced SPEM (L635-treated) were isolated and RNA sequenced. Effects on metaplasia development after acute parietal cell loss induced by L635 were evaluated in interleukin (IL)-33, IL-33 receptor (ST2) and IL-13 knockout (KO) mice.
RESULTS - Profiling of metaplasia-associated macrophages in the stomach identified an M2a-polarised macrophage population. Expression of IL-33 was significantly upregulated in macrophages associated with advanced SPEM. L635 induced metaplasia in the stomachs of wild-type mice, but not in the stomachs of IL-33 and ST2 KO mice. While IL-5 and IL-9 were not required for metaplasia induction, IL-13 KO mice did not develop metaplasia in response to L635. Administration of IL-13 to ST2 KO mice re-established the induction of metaplasia following acute parietal cell loss.
CONCLUSIONS - Metaplasia induction and macrophage polarisation after parietal cell loss is coordinated through a cytokine signalling network of IL-33 and IL-13, linking a combined response to injury by both intrinsic mucosal mechanisms and infiltrating M2 macrophages.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.
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17 MeSH Terms
Integrin-Linked Kinase Is Necessary for the Development of Diet-Induced Hepatic Insulin Resistance.
Williams AS, Trefts E, Lantier L, Grueter CA, Bracy DP, James FD, Pozzi A, Zent R, Wasserman DH
(2017) Diabetes 66: 325-334
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Extracellular Matrix, Gene Deletion, Glucose Clamp Technique, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The liver extracellular matrix (ECM) expands with high-fat (HF) feeding. This finding led us to address whether receptors for the ECM, integrins, are key to the development of diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a downstream integrin signaling molecule involved in multiple hepatic processes, including those related to differentiation, wound healing, and metabolism. We tested the hypothesis that deletion of ILK in mice on an HF diet would disrupt the ECM-integrin signaling axis, thereby preventing the transformation into the insulin-resistant liver. To determine the role of ILK in hepatic insulin action in vivo, male C57BL/6J ILK mice were crossed with Albcre mice to produce a hepatocyte-specific ILK deletion (ILKAlbcre). Results from this study show that hepatic ILK deletion has no effect on insulin action in lean mice but sensitizes the liver to insulin during the challenge of HF feeding. This effect corresponds to changes in the expression and activation of key insulin signaling pathways as well as a greater capacity for hepatic mitochondrial glucose oxidation. This demonstrates that ILK contributes to hepatic insulin resistance and highlights the previously undefined role of integrin signaling in the pathogenesis of diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance.
© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
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Macrophage Cyclooxygenase-2 Protects Against Development of Diabetic Nephropathy.
Wang X, Yao B, Wang Y, Fan X, Wang S, Niu A, Yang H, Fogo A, Zhang MZ, Harris RC
(2017) Diabetes 66: 494-504
MeSH Terms: Albuminuria, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Cyclooxygenase 2, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetic Nephropathies, Fibrosis, Immunoblotting, Immunohistochemistry, Kidney, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, NF-kappa B, Neutrophil Infiltration, Neutrophils, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Signal Transduction, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is characterized by increased macrophage infiltration, and proinflammatory M1 macrophages contribute to development of DN. Previous studies by us and others have reported that macrophage cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a role in polarization and maintenance of a macrophage tissue-reparative M2 phenotype. We examined the effects of macrophage COX-2 on development of DN in type 1 diabetes. Cultured macrophages with COX-2 deletion exhibited an M1 phenotype, as demonstrated by higher inducible nitric oxide synthase and nuclear factor-κB levels but lower interleukin-4 receptor-α levels. Compared with corresponding wild-type diabetic mice, mice with COX-2 deletion in hematopoietic cells (COX-2 knockout bone marrow transplantation) or macrophages (CD11b-Cre COX2) developed severe DN, as indicated by increased albuminuria, fibrosis, and renal infiltration of T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Although diabetic kidneys with macrophage COX-2 deletion had more macrophage infiltration, they had fewer renal M2 macrophages. Diabetic kidneys with macrophage COX-2 deletion also had increased endoplasmic reticulum stress and decreased number of podocytes. Similar results were found in diabetic mice with macrophage PGE receptor subtype 4 deletion. In summary, these studies have demonstrated an important but unexpected role for macrophage COX-2/prostaglandin E/PGE receptor subtype 4 signaling to lessen progression of diabetic kidney disease, unlike the pathogenic effects of increased COX-2 expression in intrinsic renal cells.
© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
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24 MeSH Terms
Contrasting Nav1.8 Activity in Scn10a-/- Ventricular Myocytes and the Intact Heart.
Stroud DM, Yang T, Bersell K, Kryshtal DO, Nagao S, Shaffer C, Short L, Hall L, Atack TC, Zhang W, Knollmann BC, Baudenbacher F, Roden DM
(2016) J Am Heart Assoc 5:
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Electrocardiography, Heart, Heart Ventricles, Isolated Heart Preparation, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Myocardium, Myocytes, Cardiac, NAV1.8 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2017
BACKGROUND - Genome-wide association studies have implicated variants in SCN10A, which encodes Nav1.8, as modulators of cardiac conduction. Follow-up work has indicated the SCN10A sequence includes an intronic enhancer for SCN5A. Yet the role of the Nav1.8 protein in the myocardium itself is still unclear. To investigate this, we use homozygous knockout mice (Scn10a) generated by disruption of exons 4 and 5, leaving the Scn5a enhancer intact.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We previously reported that pharmacologic blockade of Nav1.8 in wild-type animals blunts action potential prolongation by ATX-II at slow drive rates (≤1 Hz). Here we present evidence of the same blunting in Scn10a compared to wild-type ventricular myocytes, supporting the conclusion that Nav1.8 contributes to late sodium current at slow rates. In contrast to earlier studies, we found no differences in electrocardiographic parameters between genotypes. Low-dose ATX-II exposure in lightly anesthetized animals and Langendorff-perfused hearts prolonged QTc and generated arrhythmias to the same extent in wild-type and Scn10a. RNA sequencing failed to identify full-length Scn10a transcripts in wild-type or knockout isolated ventricular myocytes. However, loss of late current in Scn10a myocytes was replicated independently in a blinded set of experiments.
CONCLUSIONS - While Scn10a transcripts are not detectible in ventricular cardiomyocytes, gene deletion results in reproducible loss of late sodium current under extreme experimental conditions. However, there are no identifiable consequences of this Scn10a deletion in the intact mouse heart at usual rates. These findings argue that common variants in SCN10A that affect ventricular conduction do so by modulating SCN5A.
© 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.
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14 MeSH Terms