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Arachidonic Acid Kills Staphylococcus aureus through a Lipid Peroxidation Mechanism.
Beavers WN, Monteith AJ, Amarnath V, Mernaugh RL, Roberts LJ, Chazin WJ, Davies SS, Skaar EP
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Arachidonic Acid, Brain, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Female, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Lipids, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Mutation, Neutrophils, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Spleen, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Teichoic Acids
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
infects every niche of the human host. In response to microbial infection, vertebrates have an arsenal of antimicrobial compounds that inhibit bacterial growth or kill bacterial cells. One class of antimicrobial compounds consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are highly abundant in eukaryotes and encountered by at the host-pathogen interface. Arachidonic acid (AA) is one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in vertebrates and is released in large amounts during the oxidative burst. Most of the released AA is converted to bioactive signaling molecules, but, independently of its role in inflammatory signaling, AA is toxic to Here, we report that AA kills through a lipid peroxidation mechanism whereby AA is oxidized to reactive electrophiles that modify macromolecules, eliciting toxicity. This process is rescued by cotreatment with antioxidants as well as in a strain genetically inactivated for (USA300 mutant) that produces lower levels of reactive oxygen species. However, resistance to AA stress in the USA300 mutant comes at a cost, making the mutant more susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics and attenuated for pathogenesis in a murine infection model compared to the parental methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain, indicating that resistance to AA toxicity increases susceptibility to other stressors encountered during infection. This report defines the mechanism by which AA is toxic to and identifies lipid peroxidation as a pathway that can be modulated for the development of future therapeutics to treat infections. Despite the ability of the human immune system to generate a plethora of molecules to control infections, is among the pathogens with the greatest impact on human health. One class of host molecules toxic to consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we investigated the antibacterial properties of arachidonic acid, one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in humans, and discovered that the mechanism of toxicity against proceeds through lipid peroxidation. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the immune system kills , and by which avoids host killing, will enable the optimal design of therapeutics that complement the ability of the vertebrate immune response to eliminate infections.
Copyright © 2019 Beavers et al.
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21 MeSH Terms
Regulation of leukocyte function by citric acid cycle intermediates.
Patil NK, Bohannon JK, Hernandez A, Patil TK, Sherwood ER
(2019) J Leukoc Biol 106: 105-117
MeSH Terms: Animals, Citric Acid, Citric Acid Cycle, Fumarates, Humans, Leukocytes, Reactive Oxygen Species, Succinates, Succinic Acid
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Cellular metabolism is a means of generating ATP to provide energy for key cellular functions. However, recent research shows that citric acid cycle intermediates target vital cellular functions of the innate immune system. Succinate, itaconate, citrate, and fumarate have been shown to mediate or regulate important myeloid cell functions during infection and inflammation. This review covers the regulatory functions of citric acid cycle intermediates in myeloid cells and discusses potential translational applications, key mechanistic questions, and future research directions.
©2019 Society for Leukocyte Biology.
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2 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Peroxidasin and eosinophil peroxidase, but not myeloperoxidase, contribute to renal fibrosis in the murine unilateral ureteral obstruction model.
Colon S, Luan H, Liu Y, Meyer C, Gewin L, Bhave G
(2019) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 316: F360-F371
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Movement, Disease Models, Animal, Eosinophil Peroxidase, Eosinophils, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Female, Fibrosis, Kidney, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Nephritis, Interstitial, Peroxidase, Peroxidases, Reactive Oxygen Species, Signal Transduction, Ureteral Obstruction
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Renal fibrosis is the pathological hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and manifests as glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Reactive oxygen species contribute significantly to renal inflammation and fibrosis, but most research has focused on superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (HO). The animal heme peroxidases myeloperoxidase (MPO), eosinophil peroxidase (EPX), and peroxidasin (PXDN) uniquely metabolize HO into highly reactive and destructive hypohalous acids, such as hypobromous and hypochlorous acid. However, the role of these peroxidases and their downstream hypohalous acids in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis is unclear. Our study defines the contribution of MPO, EPX, and PXDN to renal inflammation and tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the murine unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. Using a nonspecific inhibitor of animal heme peroxidases and peroxidase-specific knockout mice, we find that loss of EPX or PXDN, but not MPO, reduces renal fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that eosinophils, the source of EPX, accumulate in the renal interstitium after UUO. These findings point to EPX and PXDN as potential therapeutic targets for renal fibrosis and CKD and suggest that eosinophils modulate the response to renal injury.
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2 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Antioxidants prevent inflammation and preserve the optic projection and visual function in experimental neurotrauma.
Bernardo-Colón A, Vest V, Clark A, Cooper ML, Calkins DJ, Harrison FE, Rex TS
(2018) Cell Death Dis 9: 1097
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antioxidants, Ascorbic Acid, Axons, Diet, Ketogenic, Disease Models, Animal, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Inflammasomes, Inflammation, Interleukin-1alpha, Interleukin-1beta, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Optic Nerve Injuries, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Retina, Superoxides, Vitamin E
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
We investigated the role of oxidative stress and the inflammasome in trauma-induced axon degeneration and vision loss using a mouse model. The left eyes of male mice were exposed to over-pressure air waves. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice were fed normal, high-vitamin-E (VitE), ketogenic or ketogenic-control diets. Mice lacking the ability to produce vitamin C (VitC) were maintained on a low-VitC diet. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and retinal superoxide levels were measured in vivo. Tissue was collected for biochemical and histological analysis. Injury increased retinal superoxide, decreased SOD2, and increased cleaved caspase-1, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 levels. Low-VitC exacerbated the changes and the high-VitE diet mitigated them, suggesting that oxidative stress led to the increase in IL-1α and activation of the inflammasome. The injury caused loss of nearly 50% of optic nerve axons at 2 weeks and astrocyte hypertrophy in mice on normal diet, both of which were prevented by the high-VitE diet. The VEP amplitude was decreased after injury in both control-diet and low-VitC mice, but not in the high-VitE-diet mice. The ketogenic diet also prevented the increase in superoxide levels and IL-1α, but had no effect on IL-1β. Despite this, the ketogenic diet preserved optic nerve axons, prevented astrocyte hypertrophy, and preserved the VEP amplitude. These data suggest that oxidative stress induces priming and activation of the inflammasome pathway after neurotrauma of the visual system. Further, blocking the activation of the inflammasome pathway may be an effective post-injury intervention.
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20 MeSH Terms
Light-activatable cannabinoid prodrug for combined and target-specific photodynamic and cannabinoid therapy.
Ling X, Zhang S, Liu Y, Bai M
(2018) J Biomed Opt 23: 1-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Cannabinoids, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Indoles, Mice, Organosilicon Compounds, Photochemotherapy, Photosensitizing Agents, Prodrugs, Reactive Oxygen Species
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Cannabinoids are emerging as promising antitumor drugs. However, complete tumor eradication solely by cannabinoid therapy remains challenging. In this study, we developed a far-red light activatable cannabinoid prodrug, which allows for tumor-specific and combinatory cannabinoid and photodynamic therapy. This prodrug consists of a phthalocyanine photosensitizer (PS), reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive linker, and cannabinoid. It targets the type-2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) overexpressed in various types of cancers. Upon the 690-nm light irradiation, the PS produces cytotoxic ROS, which simultaneously cleaves the ROS-sensitive linker and subsequently releases the cannabinoid drug. We found that this unique multifunctional prodrug design offered dramatically improved therapeutic efficacy, and therefore provided a new strategy for targeted, controlled, and effective antitumor cannabinoid therapy.
(2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).
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1 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Bid maintains mitochondrial cristae structure and function and protects against cardiac disease in an integrative genomics study.
Salisbury-Ruf CT, Bertram CC, Vergeade A, Lark DS, Shi Q, Heberling ML, Fortune NL, Okoye GD, Jerome WG, Wells QS, Fessel J, Moslehi J, Chen H, Roberts LJ, Boutaud O, Gamazon ER, Zinkel SS
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein, Beclin-1, Cell Respiration, Fibrosis, Gene Expression Regulation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Heart Diseases, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases, Mutation, Myeloid Progenitor Cells, Myocardial Infarction, Myocytes, Cardiac, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Subunits, Reactive Oxygen Species, Reproducibility of Results, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2018
Bcl-2 family proteins reorganize mitochondrial membranes during apoptosis, to form pores and rearrange cristae. In vitro and in vivo analysis integrated with human genetics reveals a novel homeostatic mitochondrial function for Bcl-2 family protein Bid. Loss of full-length Bid results in apoptosis-independent, irregular cristae with decreased respiration. mice display stress-induced myocardial dysfunction and damage. A gene-based approach applied to a biobank, validated in two independent GWAS studies, reveals that decreased genetically determined BID expression associates with myocardial infarction (MI) susceptibility. Patients in the bottom 5% of the expression distribution exhibit >4 fold increased MI risk. Carrier status with nonsynonymous variation in Bid's membrane binding domain, Bid, associates with MI predisposition. Furthermore, Bid but not Bid associates with Mcl-1, previously implicated in cristae stability; decreased MCL-1 expression associates with MI. Our results identify a role for Bid in homeostatic mitochondrial cristae reorganization, that we link to human cardiac disease.
© 2018, Salisbury-Ruf et al.
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4 Members
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26 MeSH Terms
The unassembled flavoprotein subunits of human and bacterial complex II have impaired catalytic activity and generate only minor amounts of ROS.
Maklashina E, Rajagukguk S, Iverson TM, Cecchini G
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 7754-7765
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Proteins, Catalysis, Crystallography, X-Ray, Electron Transport Complex II, Escherichia coli, Flavoproteins, Humans, Models, Molecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Conformation, Protein Subunits, Reactive Oxygen Species
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Complex II (SdhABCD) is a membrane-bound component of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport chains, as well as of the TCA cycle. In this capacity, it catalyzes the reversible oxidation of succinate. SdhABCD contains the SDHA protein harboring a covalently bound FAD redox center and the iron-sulfur protein SDHB, containing three distinct iron-sulfur centers. When assembly of this complex is compromised, the flavoprotein SDHA may accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix or bacterial cytoplasm. Whether the unassembled SDHA has any catalytic activity, for example in succinate oxidation, fumarate reduction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, or other off-pathway reactions, is not known. Therefore, here we investigated whether unassembled SdhA flavoprotein, its homolog fumarate reductase (FrdA), and the human SDHA protein have succinate oxidase or fumarate reductase activity and can produce ROS. Using recombinant expression in , we found that the free flavoproteins from these divergent biological sources have inherently low catalytic activity and generate little ROS. These results suggest that the iron-sulfur protein SDHB in complex II is necessary for robust catalytic activity. Our findings are consistent with those reported for single-subunit flavoprotein homologs that are not associated with iron-sulfur or heme partner proteins.
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MeSH Terms
Oxidative stress increases M1dG, a major peroxidation-derived DNA adduct, in mitochondrial DNA.
Wauchope OR, Mitchener MM, Beavers WN, Galligan JJ, Camarillo JM, Sanders WD, Kingsley PJ, Shim HN, Blackwell T, Luong T, deCaestecker M, Fessel JP, Marnett LJ
(2018) Nucleic Acids Res 46: 3458-3467
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, DNA Adducts, DNA, Mitochondrial, Electron Transport, Endothelial Cells, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Lipid Peroxidation, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mitochondria, Mutagenesis, Oxidants, Oxidative Stress, Purine Nucleosides, Reactive Oxygen Species, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in mitochondria during electron transport and energy generation. Elevated levels of ROS lead to increased amounts of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. We report that levels of M1dG, a major endogenous peroxidation-derived DNA adduct, are 50-100-fold higher in mtDNA than in nuclear DNA in several different human cell lines. Treatment of cells with agents that either increase or decrease mitochondrial superoxide levels leads to increased or decreased levels of M1dG in mtDNA, respectively. Sequence analysis of adducted mtDNA suggests that M1dG residues are randomly distributed throughout the mitochondrial genome. Basal levels of M1dG in mtDNA from pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) from transgenic bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 mutant mice (BMPR2R899X) (four adducts per 106 dG) are twice as high as adduct levels in wild-type cells. A similar increase was observed in mtDNA from heterozygous null (BMPR2+/-) compared to wild-type PMVECs. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is observed in the presence of BMPR2 signaling disruptions, which are also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant injury to endothelial tissue. Persistence of M1dG adducts in mtDNA could have implications for mutagenesis and mitochondrial gene expression, thereby contributing to the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in diseases.
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3 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Hepatic Gi signaling regulates whole-body glucose homeostasis.
Rossi M, Zhu L, McMillin SM, Pydi SP, Jain S, Wang L, Cui Y, Lee RJ, Cohen AH, Kaneto H, Birnbaum MJ, Ma Y, Rotman Y, Liu J, Cyphert TJ, Finkel T, McGuinness OP, Wess J
(2018) J Clin Invest 128: 746-759
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases, Female, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go, Gene Expression Profiling, Glucagon, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Hepatocytes, Homeostasis, Humans, Liver, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Oxygen, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphorylation, Reactive Oxygen Species, Receptors, Glucagon, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
An increase in hepatic glucose production (HGP) is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Excessive signaling through hepatic Gs-linked glucagon receptors critically contributes to pathologically elevated HGP. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this metabolic impairment can be counteracted by enhancing hepatic Gi signaling. Specifically, we used a chemogenetic approach to selectively activate Gi-type G proteins in mouse hepatocytes in vivo. Unexpectedly, activation of hepatic Gi signaling triggered a pronounced increase in HGP and severely impaired glucose homeostasis. Moreover, increased Gi signaling stimulated glucose release in human hepatocytes. A lack of functional Gi-type G proteins in hepatocytes reduced blood glucose levels and protected mice against the metabolic deficits caused by the consumption of a high-fat diet. Additionally, we delineated a signaling cascade that links hepatic Gi signaling to ROS production, JNK activation, and a subsequent increase in HGP. Taken together, our data support the concept that drugs able to block hepatic Gi-coupled GPCRs may prove beneficial as antidiabetic drugs.
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23 MeSH Terms
Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cyclic Hydroxylamine Spin Probes.
Dikalov SI, Polienko YF, Kirilyuk I
(2018) Antioxid Redox Signal 28: 1433-1443
MeSH Terms: Animals, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Free Radicals, Humans, Hydroxylamine, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Spin Labels
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
SIGNIFICANCE - Oxidative stress contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions such as development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. A variety of measurements of oxidative stress markers in biological systems have been developed; however, many of these methods are not specific, can produce artifacts, and do not directly detect the free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a unique tool that allows direct measurements of free radical species. Cyclic hydroxylamines are useful and convenient molecular probes that readily react with ROS to produce stable nitroxide radicals, which can be quantitatively measured by EPR. In this work, we critically review recent applications of various cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes in biology to study oxidative stress, their advantages, and the shortcomings. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes have been developed and their successful application for ROS measurement using EPR has been published. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo studies.
CRITICAL ISSUES - Although cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes EPR application has been previously described, there has been lack of translation of these new methods into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. This work summarizes "best practice" in applications of cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes to assist with EPR studies of oxidative stress.
FUTURE DIRECTIONS - Additional studies to advance hydroxylamine spin probes from the "basic science" to biomedical applications are needed and could lead to better understanding of pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 1433-1443.
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9 MeSH Terms