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Biophysical model-based parameters to classify tumor recurrence from radiation-induced necrosis for brain metastases.
Narasimhan S, Johnson HB, Nickles TM, Miga MI, Rana N, Attia A, Weis JA
(2019) Med Phys 46: 2487-2496
MeSH Terms: Brain Neoplasms, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Models, Biological, Necrosis, Patient-Specific Modeling, Radiation Injuries, Radiosurgery, Recurrence, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
PURPOSE - Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is used for local control treatment of patients with intracranial metastases. As a result of SRS, some patients develop radiation-induced necrosis. Radiographically, radiation-induced necrosis can appear similar to tumor recurrence in magnetic resonance (MR) T -weighted contrast-enhanced imaging, T -weighted MR imaging, and Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging. Radiographic ambiguities often necessitate invasive brain biopsies to determine lesion etiology or cause delayed subsequent therapy initiation. We use a biomechanically coupled tumor growth model to estimate patient-specific model parameters and model-derived measures to noninvasively classify etiology of enhancing lesions in this patient population.
METHODS - In this initial, preliminary retrospective study, we evaluated five patients with tumor recurrence and five with radiation-induced necrosis. Longitudinal patient-specific MR imaging data were used in conjunction with the model to parameterize tumor cell proliferation rate and tumor cell diffusion coefficient, and Dice correlation coefficients were used to quantify degree of correlation between model-estimated mechanical stress fields and edema visualized from MR imaging.
RESULTS - Results found four statistically relevant parameters which can differentiate tumor recurrence and radiation-induced necrosis.
CONCLUSIONS - This preliminary investigation suggests potential of this framework to noninvasively determine the etiology of enhancing lesions in patients who previously underwent SRS for intracranial metastases.
© 2019 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.
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10 MeSH Terms
Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Cranial Intraparenchymal Metastasis of a Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor: Case Report and Review of the Literature.
Fenlon JB, Khattab MH, Ferguson DC, Luo G, Keedy VL, Chambless LB, Kirschner AN
(2019) World Neurosurg 123: 123-127
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain Neoplasms, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Nerve Sheath Neoplasms, Neurofibrosarcoma, Particle Accelerators, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiosurgery
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
BACKGROUND - Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare, aggressive soft tissue sarcomas. MPNST intracranial metastasis is exceedingly rare with only 22 documented cases in the literature and, to our knowledge, only 1 case with intraparenchymal brain metastasis. Most have been managed surgically; however, 2 documented cases were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Excluding this case report, there are no other documented cases of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to treat MPNST brain metastasis.
CASE DESCRIPTION - A 41-year-old man with MPNST of the lung initially underwent tumor resection. He developed multiple systemic metastases that were managed with directed radiation therapy. A parietal brain metastasis was treated with linear accelerator-based SRS. Following SRS therapy, the patient was treated with a tropomyosin receptor kinase inhibitor. Complete resolution of brain metastasis was seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging 5 months after treatment with SRS. At 11 months after SRS, there was no evidence of recurrence or progression of the intraparenchymal disease. The patient continued to have stable extracranial disease on his ninth cycle of systemic treatment.
CONCLUSIONS - This report provides important insights into efficacy of linear accelerator-based SRS to treat MPNST brain metastases.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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A modern epilepsy surgery treatment algorithm: Incorporating traditional and emerging technologies.
Englot DJ
(2018) Epilepsy Behav 80: 68-74
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Epilepsy, Generalized, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures, Quality of Life, Radiosurgery, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
Epilepsy surgery has seen numerous technological advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in recent years. This has increased the number of patients who may be candidates for intervention and potential improvement in quality of life. However, the expansion of the field also necessitates a broader understanding of how to incorporate both traditional and emerging technologies into the care provided at comprehensive epilepsy centers. This review summarizes both old and new surgical procedures in epilepsy using an example algorithm. While treatment algorithms are inherently oversimplified, incomplete, and reflect personal bias, they provide a general framework that can be customized to each center and each patient, incorporating differences in provider opinion, patient preference, and the institutional availability of technologies. For instance, the use of minimally invasive stereotactic electroencephalography (SEEG) has increased dramatically over the past decade, but many cases still benefit from invasive recordings using subdural grids. Furthermore, although surgical resection remains the gold-standard treatment for focal mesial temporal or neocortical epilepsy, ablative procedures such as laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be appropriate and avoid craniotomy in many cases. Furthermore, while palliative surgical procedures were once limited to disconnection surgeries, several neurostimulation treatments are now available to treat eloquent cortical, bitemporal, and even multifocal or generalized epilepsy syndromes. An updated perspective in epilepsy surgery will help guide surgical decision making and lay the groundwork for data collection needed in future studies and trials.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Margin of error for a frameless image guided radiosurgery system: Direct confirmation based on posttreatment MRI scans.
Luo G, Neimat JS, Cmelak A, Kirschner AN, Attia A, Morales-Paliza M, Ding GX
(2017) Pract Radiat Oncol 7: e223-e231
MeSH Terms: Brain, Essential Tremor, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Margins of Excision, Parkinson Disease, Quality Control, Radiosurgery, Radiotherapy Dosage, Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted, Thalamus
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
PURPOSE - To report on radiosurgery delivery positioning accuracy in the treatment of tremor patients with frameless image guided radiosurgery using the linear accelerator (LINAC) based ExacTrac system and to describe quality assurance (QA) procedures used.
METHODS AND MATERIALS - Between 2010 and 2015, 20 patients underwent radiosurgical thalamotomy targeting the ventral intermediate nucleus for the treatment of severe tremor. The median prescription dose was 140 Gy (range, 120-145 Gy) in a single fraction. The median maximum dose was 156 Gy (range, 136-162 Gy). All treatment planning was performed with the iPlan system using a 4-mm circular cone with multiple arcs. Before each treatment, QA procedures were performed, including the imaging system. As a result of the extremely high dose delivered in a single fraction, a well-defined circular mark developed on the posttreatment magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eight of these 20 patients were selected to evaluate treatment localization errors because their circular marks were available in posttreatment MRI. In this study, the localization error is defined as the distance between the center of the intended target and the center of the posttreatment mark.
RESULTS - The mean error of distance was found to be 1.1 mm (range, 0.4-1.5 mm). The mean errors for the left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior directions are 0.5 mm, 0.6 mm, and 0.7 mm, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - The result reported in this study includes all tremor patients treated at our institution when their posttreatment MRI data were available for study. It represents a direct confirmation of target positioning accuracy in radiosurgery with a LINAC-based frameless system and its limitations. This level of accuracy is only achievable with an appropriate QA program in place for a LINAC-based frameless radiosurgery system.
Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Seizure outcomes in nonresective epilepsy surgery: an update.
Englot DJ, Birk H, Chang EF
(2017) Neurosurg Rev 40: 181-194
MeSH Terms: Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Electric Stimulation Therapy, Epilepsy, Humans, Laser Therapy, Neurosurgical Procedures, Radiosurgery, Seizures, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
In approximately 30 % of patients with epilepsy, seizures are refractory to medical therapy, leading to significant morbidity and increased mortality. Substantial evidence has demonstrated the benefit of surgical resection in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy, and in the present journal, we recently reviewed seizure outcomes in resective epilepsy surgery. However, not all patients are candidates for or amenable to open surgical resection for epilepsy. Fortunately, several nonresective surgical options are now available at various epilepsy centers, including novel therapies which have been pioneered in recent years. Ablative procedures such as stereotactic laser ablation and stereotactic radiosurgery offer minimally invasive alternatives to open surgery with relatively favorable seizure outcomes, particularly in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For certain individuals who are not candidates for ablation or resection, palliative neuromodulation procedures such as vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation, or responsive neurostimulation may result in a significant decrease in seizure frequency and improved quality of life. Finally, disconnection procedures such as multiple subpial transections and corpus callosotomy continue to play a role in select patients with an eloquent epileptogenic zone or intractable atonic seizures, respectively. Overall, open surgical resection remains the gold standard treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy, although it is significantly underutilized. While nonresective epilepsy procedures have not replaced the need for resection, there is hope that these additional surgical options will increase the number of patients who receive treatment for this devastating disorder-particularly individuals who are not candidates for or who have failed resection.
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9 MeSH Terms
Radiotherapy-induced hemichorea.
Isaacs D, Cmelak A, Kirschner AN, Phibbs F
(2016) Neurology 86: 1355-1357
MeSH Terms: Aged, Chorea, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Radiosurgery, Tremor, Ventral Thalamic Nuclei
Added April 2, 2019
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Retracting, Replacing, and Correcting the Literature for Pervasive Error in Which the Results Change but the Underlying Science Is Still Reliable.
Heckers S, Bauchner H, Flanagin A
(2015) JAMA Psychiatry 72: 1170-1
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Internal Capsule, Male, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Radiosurgery
Added February 22, 2016
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6 MeSH Terms
Extended Survival and Prognostic Factors for Patients With ALK-Rearranged Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastasis.
Johung KL, Yeh N, Desai NB, Williams TM, Lautenschlaeger T, Arvold ND, Ning MS, Attia A, Lovly CM, Goldberg S, Beal K, Yu JB, Kavanagh BD, Chiang VL, Camidge DR, Contessa JN
(2016) J Clin Oncol 34: 123-9
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase, Antineoplastic Agents, Brain Neoplasms, Carbazoles, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Cranial Irradiation, Crizotinib, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gene Rearrangement, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Karnofsky Performance Status, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Neoplasm Staging, Piperidines, Prognosis, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Pyrazoles, Pyridines, Pyrimidines, Radiosurgery, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Smoking, Sulfones
Show Abstract · Added January 26, 2016
PURPOSE - We performed a multi-institutional study to identify prognostic factors and determine outcomes for patients with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and brain metastasis.
PATIENTS AND METHODS - A total of 90 patients with brain metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC were identified from six institutions; 84 of 90 patients received radiotherapy to the brain (stereotactic radiosurgery [SRS] or whole-brain radiotherapy [WBRT]), and 86 of 90 received tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. Estimates for overall (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival were determined and clinical prognostic factors were identified by Cox proportional hazards modeling.
RESULTS - Median OS after development of brain metastases was 49.5 months (95% CI, 29.0 months to not reached), and median intracranial progression-free survival was 11.9 months (95% CI, 10.1 to 18.2 months). Forty-five percent of patients with follow-up had progressive brain metastases at death, and repeated interventions for brain metastases were common. Absence of extracranial metastases, Karnofsky performance score ≥ 90, and no history of TKIs before development of brain metastases were associated with improved survival (P = .003, < .001, and < .001, respectively), whereas a single brain metastasis or initial treatment with SRS versus WBRT were not (P = .633 and .666, respectively). Prognostic factors significant by multivariable analysis were used to describe four patient groups with 2-year OS estimates of 33%, 59%, 76%, and 100%, respectively (P < .001).
CONCLUSION - Patients with brain metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with radiotherapy (SRS and/or WBRT) and TKIs have prolonged survival, suggesting that interventions to control intracranial disease are critical. The refinement of prognosis for this molecular subtype of NSCLC identifies a population of patients likely to benefit from first-line SRS, close CNS observation, and treatment of emergent CNS disease.
© 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.
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Interventional Oncology: Adding Options to the Care of Patients with Cancer.
Brown DB
(2015) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 13: 825-6
MeSH Terms: Humans, Neoplasms, Radiosurgery
Added September 18, 2015
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Minimally invasive surgical approaches for temporal lobe epilepsy.
Chang EF, Englot DJ, Vadera S
(2015) Epilepsy Behav 47: 24-33
MeSH Terms: Amygdala, Anterior Temporal Lobectomy, Cerebral Cortex, Deep Brain Stimulation, Epilepsy, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Male, Middle Aged, Neurosurgical Procedures, Quality of Life, Radiosurgery, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
Surgery can be a highly effective treatment for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The emergence of minimally invasive resective and nonresective treatment options has led to interest in epilepsy surgery among patients and providers. Nevertheless, not all procedures are appropriate for all patients, and it is critical to consider seizure outcomes with each of these approaches, as seizure freedom is the greatest predictor of patient quality of life. Standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) remains the gold standard in the treatment of TLE, with seizure freedom resulting in 60-80% of patients. It is currently the only resective epilepsy surgery supported by randomized controlled trials and offers the best protection against lateral temporal seizure onset. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy techniques preserve the lateral cortex and temporal stem to varying degrees and can result in favorable rates of seizure freedom but the risk of recurrent seizures appears slightly greater than with ATL, and it is not clear whether neuropsychological outcomes are improved with selective approaches. Stereotactic radiosurgery presents an opportunity to avoid surgery altogether, with seizure outcomes now under investigation. Stereotactic laser thermo-ablation allows destruction of the mesial temporal structures with low complication rates and minimal recovery time, and outcomes are also under study. Finally, while neuromodulatory devices such as responsive neurostimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation have a role in the treatment of certain patients, these remain palliative procedures for those who are not candidates for resection or ablation, as complete seizure freedom rates are low. Further development and investigation of both established and novel strategies for the surgical treatment of TLE will be critical moving forward, given the significant burden of this disease.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms