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The relationship between domain-specific subjective cognitive decline and Alzheimer's pathology in normal elderly adults.
Shokouhi S, Conley AC, Baker SL, Albert K, Kang H, Gwirtsman HE, Newhouse PA, Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
(2019) Neurobiol Aging 81: 22-29
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Aniline Compounds, Brain, Cognition, Cognitive Dysfunction, Ethylene Glycols, Fluorine Radioisotopes, Humans, Neuroimaging, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, tau Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
We evaluated the associations of subjective (self-reported everyday cognition [ECog]) and objective cognitive measures with regional amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau accumulation in 86 clinically normal elderly subjects from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Regression analyses were conducted to identify whether individual ECog domains (Memory, Language, Organization, Planning, Visuospatial, and Divided Attention) were equally or differentially associated with regional [F]florbetapir and [F]flortaucipir uptake and how these associations compared to those obtained with objective cognitive measures. A texture analysis, the weighted 2-point correlation, was used as an additional approach for estimating the whole-brain tau burden without positron emission tomography intensity normalization. Although the strongest models for ECog domains included either tau (planning and visuospatial) or Aβ (memory and organization), the strongest models for all objective measures included Aβ. In Aβ-negative participants, the strongest models for all ECog domains of executive functioning included tau. Our results indicate differential associations of individual subjective cognitive domains with Aβ and tau in clinically normal adults. Detailed characterization of ECog may render a valuable prescreening tool for pathological prediction.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Individual differences in dopamine D receptor availability correlate with reward valuation.
Dang LC, Samanez-Larkin GR, Castrellon JJ, Perkins SF, Cowan RL, Zald DH
(2018) Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 18: 739-747
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anticipation, Psychological, Benzamides, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Female, Fluorine Radioisotopes, Humans, Individuality, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Oxygen, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Reward
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Reward valuation, which underlies all value-based decision-making, has been associated with dopamine function in many studies of nonhuman animals, but there is relatively less direct evidence for an association in humans. Here, we measured dopamine D receptor (DRD2) availability in vivo in humans to examine relations between individual differences in dopamine receptor availability and neural activity associated with a measure of reward valuation, expected value (i.e., the product of reward magnitude and the probability of obtaining the reward). Fourteen healthy adult subjects underwent PET with [F]fallypride, a radiotracer with strong affinity for DRD2, and fMRI (on a separate day) while performing a reward valuation task. [F]fallypride binding potential, reflecting DRD2 availability, in the midbrain correlated positively with neural activity associated with expected value, specifically in the left ventral striatum/caudate. The present results provide in vivo evidence from humans showing midbrain dopamine characteristics are associated with reward valuation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of the novel TSPO radiotracer 2-(7-butyl-2-(4-(2-([F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-N,N-diethylacetamide in a preclinical model of neuroinflammation.
Tang D, Fujinaga M, Hatori A, Zhang Y, Yamasaki T, Xie L, Mori W, Kumata K, Liu J, Manning HC, Huang G, Zhang MR
(2018) Eur J Med Chem 150: 1-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fluorine Radioisotopes, Humans, Inflammation, Ischemia, Male, Mice, Molecular Probes, Molecular Structure, Positron-Emission Tomography, Pyrazoles, Pyrimidines, Radioactive Tracers, Radiopharmaceuticals, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, GABA, Structure-Activity Relationship, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
Translocator Protein (18 kDa, TSPO) is regarded as a useful biomarker for neuroinflammation imaging. TSPO PET imaging could be used to understand the role of neuroinflammation in brain diseases and as a tool for evaluating novel therapeutic effects. As a promising TSPO probe, [F]DPA-714 is highly specific and offers reliable quantification of TSPO in vivo. In this study, we further radiosynthesized and evaluated another novel TSPO probe, 2-(7-butyl-2-(4-(2-[F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5-methylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)-N,N-diethylacetamide ([F]VUIIS1018A), which features a 700-fold higher binding affinity for TSPO than that of [F]DPA-714. We evaluated the performance of [F]VUIIS1018A using dynamic in vivo PET imaging, radiometabolite analysis, in vitro autoradiography assays, biodistribution analysis, and blocking assays. In vivo study using this probe demonstrated high signal-to-noise ratio, binding potential (BP), and binding specificity in preclinical neuroinflammation studies. Taken together, these findings indicate that [F]VUIIS1018A may serve as a novel TSPO PET probe for neuroinflammation imaging.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.
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21 MeSH Terms
Nigrostriatal and Mesolimbic D Receptor Expression in Parkinson's Disease Patients with Compulsive Reward-Driven Behaviors.
Stark AJ, Smith CT, Lin YC, Petersen KJ, Trujillo P, van Wouwe NC, Kang H, Donahue MJ, Kessler RM, Zald DH, Claassen DO
(2018) J Neurosci 38: 3230-3239
MeSH Terms: Aged, Benzamides, Compulsive Behavior, Dopamine Agonists, Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists, Female, Humans, Limbic System, Male, Middle Aged, Parkinson Disease, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Dopamine D3, Reward, Substantia Nigra
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
The nigrostriatal and mesocorticolimbic dopamine networks regulate reward-driven behavior. Regional alterations to mesolimbic dopamine D receptor expression are described in drug-seeking and addiction disorders. Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are frequently prescribed D-like dopamine agonist (DAgonist) therapy for motor symptoms, yet a proportion develop clinically significant behavioral addictions characterized by impulsive and compulsive behaviors (ICBs). Until now, changes in D receptor binding in both striatal and extrastriatal regions have not been concurrently quantified in this population. We identified 35 human PD patients (both male and female) receiving DAgonist therapy, with ( = 17) and without ( = 18) ICBs, matched for age, disease duration, disease severity, and dose of dopamine therapy. In the off-dopamine state, all completed PET imaging with [F]fallypride, a high affinity D-like receptor ligand that can measure striatal and extrastriatal D nondisplaceable binding potential (BP). Striatal differences between ICB+/ICB- patients localized to the ventral striatum and putamen, where ICB+ subjects had reduced BP In this group, self-reported severity of ICB symptoms positively correlated with midbrain D receptor BP Group differences in regional D BP relationships were also notable: ICB+ (but not ICB-) patients expressed positive correlations between midbrain and caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and amygdala BPs. These findings support the hypothesis that compulsive behaviors in PD are associated with reduced ventral and dorsal striatal D expression, similar to changes in comparable behavioral disorders. The data also suggest that relatively preserved ventral midbrain dopaminergic projections throughout nigrostriatal and mesolimbic networks are characteristic of ICB+ patients, and may account for differential DAgonist therapeutic response. The biologic determinants of compulsive reward-based behaviors have broad clinical relevance, from addiction to neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we address biomolecular distinctions in Parkinson's disease patients with impulsive compulsive behaviors (ICBs). This is the first study to image a large cohort of ICB+ patients using positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride, allowing quantification of D receptors throughout the mesocorticolimbic network. We demonstrate widespread differences in dopaminergic networks, including (1) D2-like receptor distinctions in the ventral striatum and putamen, and (2) a preservation of widespread dopaminergic projections emerging from the midbrain, which is associated with the severity of compulsive behaviors. This clearly illustrates the roles of D receptors and medication effects in maladaptive behaviors, and localizes them specifically to nigrostriatal and extrastriatal regions.
Copyright © 2018 the authors 0270-6474/18/383231-10$15.00/0.
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17 MeSH Terms
FTO affects food cravings and interacts with age to influence age-related decline in food cravings.
Dang LC, Samanez-Larkin GR, Smith CT, Castrellon JJ, Perkins SF, Cowan RL, Claassen DO, Zald DH
(2018) Physiol Behav 192: 188-193
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Alpha-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Dioxygenase FTO, Benzamides, Body Mass Index, Brain, Craving, Feeding Behavior, Female, Food, Genetic Association Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Positron-Emission Tomography, Pyrrolidines, Radiopharmaceuticals, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) was the first gene identified by genome-wide association studies to correlate with higher body mass index (BMI) and increased odds of obesity. FTO remains the locus with the largest and most replicated effect on body weight, but the mechanism whereby FTO affects body weight and the development of obesity is not fully understood. Here we tested whether FTO is associated with differences in food cravings and a key aspect of dopamine function that has been hypothesized to influence food reward mechanisms. Moreover, as food cravings and dopamine function are known to decline with age, we explored effects of age on relations between FTO and food cravings and dopamine function. Seven-eight healthy subjects between 22 and 83years old completed the Food Cravings Questionnaire and underwent genotyping for FTO rs9939609, the first FTO single nucleotide polymorphism associated with obesity. Compared to TT homozygotes, individuals carrying the obesity-susceptible A allele had higher total food cravings, which correlated with higher BMI. Additionally, food cravings declined with age, but this age effect differed across variants of FTO rs9939609: while TT homozygotes showed the typical age-related decline in food cravings, there was no such decline among A carriers. All subjects were scanned with [18F]fallypride PET to assess a recent proposal that at the neurochemical level FTO alters dopamine D2-like receptor (DRD2) function to influence food reward related mechanisms. However, we observed no evidence of FTO effects on DRD2 availability.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
In vivo neuroimaging and behavioral correlates in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction.
Barry RL, Byun NE, Tantawy MN, Mackey CA, Wilson GH, Stark AJ, Flom MP, Gee LC, Quarles CC
(2018) Brain Imaging Behav 12: 87-95
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cognitive Dysfunction, Conditioning, Psychological, Disease Models, Animal, Doxorubicin, Fear, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Neuroimaging, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Recognition, Psychology, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Adjuvant chemotherapy has been used for decades to treat cancer, and it is well known that disruptions in cognitive function and memory are common chemotherapeutic adverse effects. However, studies using neuropsychological metrics have also reported group differences in cognitive function and memory before or without chemotherapy, suggesting that complex factors obscure the true etiology of chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction (CICD) in humans. Therefore, to better understand possible mechanisms of CICD, we explored the effects of CICD in rats through cognition testing using novel object recognition (NOR) and contextual fear conditioning (CFC), and through metabolic neuroimaging via [F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Cancer-naïve, female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either saline (1 mL/kg) or doxorubicin (DOX) (1 mg/kg in a volume of 1 mL/kg) weekly for five weeks (total dose = 5 mg/kg), and underwent cognition testing and PET imaging immediately following the treatment regime and 30 days post treatment. We did not observe significant differences with CFC testing post-treatment for either group. However, the chemotherapy group exhibited significantly decreased performance in the NOR test and decreased F-FDG uptake only in the prefrontal cortex 30 days post-treatment. These results suggest that long-term impairment within the prefrontal cortex is a plausible mechanism of CICD in this study, suggesting DOX-induced toxicity in the prefrontal cortex at the dose used.
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18 MeSH Terms
Reduced effects of age on dopamine D2 receptor levels in physically active adults.
Dang LC, Castrellon JJ, Perkins SF, Le NT, Cowan RL, Zald DH, Samanez-Larkin GR
(2017) Neuroimage 148: 123-129
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Benzamides, Brain, Cross-Sectional Studies, Exercise, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Dopamine D3, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Physical activity has been shown to ameliorate dopaminergic degeneration in non-human animal models. However, the effects of regular physical activity on normal age-related changes in dopamine function in humans are unknown. Here we present cross-sectional data from forty-four healthy human subjects between 23 and 80 years old, showing that typical age-related dopamine D2 receptor loss, assessed with PET [18F]fallypride, was significantly reduced in physically active adults compared to less active adults.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Utility of [F]FSPG PET to Image Hepatocellular Carcinoma: First Clinical Evaluation in a US Population.
Kavanaugh G, Williams J, Morris AS, Nickels ML, Walker R, Koglin N, Stephens AW, Washington MK, Geevarghese SK, Liu Q, Ayers D, Shyr Y, Manning HC
(2016) Mol Imaging Biol 18: 924-934
MeSH Terms: Acetates, Adult, Aged, Amino Acid Transport System y+, Carbon Radioisotopes, Carcinoma, Hepatocellular, Female, Glutamates, Glutamic Acid, Humans, Liver Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Positron-Emission Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Tissue Array Analysis
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
PURPOSE - Non-invasive imaging is central to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosis; however, conventional modalities are limited by smaller tumors and other chronic diseases that are often present in patients with HCC, such as cirrhosis. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of (4S)-4-(3-[F]fluoropropyl)-L-glutamic acid ([F]FSPG) positron emission tomography (PET)/X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image HCC. [F]FSPG PET/CT was compared to standard-of-care (SOC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT, and [C]acetate PET/CT, commonly used in this setting. We report the largest cohort of HCC patients imaged to date with [F]FSPG PET/CT and present the first comparison to [C]acetate PET/CT and SOC imaging. This study represents the first in a US HCC population, which is distinguished by different underlying comorbidities than non-US populations.
PROCEDURES - x transporter RNA and protein levels were evaluated in HCC and matched liver samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (n = 16) and a tissue microarray (n = 83). Eleven HCC patients who underwent prior MRI or CT scans were imaged by [F]FSPG PET/CT, with seven patients also imaged with [C]acetate PET/CT.
RESULTS - x transporter RNA and protein levels were elevated in HCC samples compared to background liver. Over 50 % of low-grade HCCs and ~70 % of high-grade tumors exceeded background liver protein expression. [F]FSPG PET/CT demonstrated a detection rate of 75 %. [F]FSPG PET/CT also identified an HCC devoid of typical MRI enhancement pattern. Patients scanned with [F]FSPG and [C]acetate PET/CT exhibited a 90 and 70 % detection rate, respectively. In dually positive tumors, [F]FSPG accumulation consistently resulted in significantly greater tumor-to-liver background ratios compared with [C]acetate PET/CT.
CONCLUSIONS - [F]FSPG PET/CT is a promising modality for HCC imaging, and larger studies are warranted to examine [F]FSPG PET/CT impact on diagnosis and management of HCC. [F]FSPG PET/CT may also be useful for phenotyping HCC tumor metabolism as part of precision cancer medicine.
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2 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Associations between dopamine D2 receptor availability and BMI depend on age.
Dang LC, Samanez-Larkin GR, Castrellon JJ, Perkins SF, Cowan RL, Zald DH
(2016) Neuroimage 138: 176-183
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Benzamides, Biological Availability, Body Mass Index, Brain, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Imaging, Positron-Emission Tomography, Pyrrolidines, Radiopharmaceuticals, Receptors, Dopamine D2, Receptors, Dopamine D3, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity, Statistics as Topic, Tissue Distribution, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
OBJECTIVE - The dopamine D2/3 receptor subtypes (DRD2/3) are the most widely studied neurotransmitter biomarker in research on obesity, but results to date have been inconsistent, have typically involved small samples, and have rarely accounted for subjects' ages despite the large impact of age on DRD2/3 levels. We aimed to clarify the relation between DRD2/3 availability and BMI by examining this association in a large sample of subjects with BMI spanning the continuum from underweight to extremely obese.
SUBJECTS - 130 healthy subjects between 18 and 81years old underwent PET with [18F]fallypride, a high affinity DRD2/3 ligand.
RESULTS - As expected, DRD2/3 availability declined with age. Critically, age significantly interacted with DRD2/3 availability in predicting BMI in the midbrain and striatal regions (caudate, putamen, and ventral striatum). Among subjects under 30years old, BMI was not associated with DRD2/3 availability. By contrast, among subjects over 30years old, BMI was positively associated with DRD2/3 availability in the midbrain, putamen, and ventral striatum.
CONCLUSION - The present results are incompatible with the prominent dopaminergic hypofunction hypothesis that proposes that a reduction in DRD2/3 availability is associated with increased BMI, and highlights the importance of age in assessing correlates of DRD2/3 function.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms
Characterizing active and inactive brown adipose tissue in adult humans using PET-CT and MR imaging.
Gifford A, Towse TF, Walker RC, Avison MJ, Welch EB
(2016) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 311: E95-E104
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Brown, Adult, Cold Temperature, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography, Radiopharmaceuticals, Thermogenesis, Thoracic Wall, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 24, 2016
Activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in thermogenesis and whole body metabolism in mammals. Positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) imaging has identified depots of BAT in adult humans, igniting scientific interest. The purpose of this study is to characterize both active and inactive supraclavicular BAT in adults and compare the values to those of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT). We obtained [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG) PET-CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 25 healthy adults. Unlike [(18)F]FDG PET, which can detect only active BAT, MRI is capable of detecting both active and inactive BAT. The MRI-derived fat signal fraction (FSF) of active BAT was significantly lower than that of inactive BAT (means ± SD; 60.2 ± 7.6 vs. 62.4 ± 6.8%, respectively). This change in tissue morphology was also reflected as a significant increase in Hounsfield units (HU; -69.4 ± 11.5 vs. -74.5 ± 9.7 HU, respectively). Additionally, the CT HU, MRI FSF, and MRI R2* values are significantly different between BAT and WAT, regardless of the activation status of BAT. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify PET-CT and MRI FSF measurements and utilize a semiautomated algorithm to identify inactive and active BAT in the same adult subjects. Our findings support the use of these metrics to characterize and distinguish between BAT and WAT and lay the foundation for future MRI analysis with the hope that some day MRI-based delineation of BAT can stand on its own.
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14 MeSH Terms