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Self WH, Upchurch CP, Wunderink RG, Waterer GW, Grijalva CG, Edwards KM
(2018) Chest 153: 763-764
MeSH Terms: Community-Acquired Infections, Humans, Pneumonia, Radiography, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Added July 27, 2018
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5 MeSH Terms
Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia.
Williams DJ, Edwards KM, Self WH, Zhu Y, Arnold SR, McCullers JA, Ampofo K, Pavia AT, Anderson EJ, Hicks LA, Bramley AM, Jain S, Grijalva CG
(2017) JAMA Pediatr 171: 1184-1191
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Drug Therapy, Combination, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Length of Stay, Macrolides, Patient Readmission, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Propensity Score, Radiography, Treatment Outcome, beta-Lactams
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Importance - β-Lactam monotherapy and β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy are both common empirical treatment strategies for children hospitalized with pneumonia, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these 2 treatment approaches.
Objective - To compare the effectiveness of β-lactam monotherapy vs β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy among a cohort of children hospitalized with pneumonia.
Design, Setting, and Participants - We analyzed data from the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study, a multicenter, prospective, population-based study of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations conducted from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, in 3 children's hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The study included all children (up to 18 years of age) who were hospitalized with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and who received β-lactam monotherapy or β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Data analysis was completed in April 2017.
Main Outcomes and Measures - We defined the referent as β-lactam monotherapy, including exclusive use of an oral or parenteral second- or third-generation cephalosporin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanate. Use of a β-lactam plus an oral or parenteral macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin) served as the comparison group. We modeled the association between these groups and patients' length of stay using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables. We further evaluated length of stay in a cohort matched by propensity to receive combination therapy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate secondary outcomes in the unmatched cohort, including intensive care admission, rehospitalizations, and self-reported recovery at follow-up.
Results - Our study included 1418 children (693 girls and 725 boys) with a median age of 27 months (interquartile range, 12-69 months). This cohort was 60.1% of the 2358 children enrolled in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the study period; 1019 (71.9%) received β-lactam monotherapy and 399 (28.1%) received β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. In the unmatched cohort, there was no statistically significant difference in length of hospital stay between children receiving β-lactam monotherapy and combination therapy (median, 55 vs 59 hours; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.74-1.01). The propensity-matched cohort (n = 560, 39.5%) showed similar results. There were also no significant differences between treatment groups for the secondary outcomes.
Conclusions and Relevance - Empirical macrolide combination therapy conferred no benefit over β-lactam monotherapy for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The results of this study elicit questions about the routine empirical use of macrolide combination therapy in this population.
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Novel Airway and Ventilator Management of Tracheobronchial Disruption After Blunt Trauma.
Mehdiratta N, Archer M, Stewart M, Dennis B, Grogan E
(2017) Ann Thorac Surg 104: e359-e361
MeSH Terms: Accidents, Traffic, Bronchi, Bronchoscopy, Combined Modality Therapy, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Injury Severity Score, Middle Aged, Multiple Trauma, Positive-Pressure Respiration, Radiography, Thoracic, Risk Assessment, Thoracic Injuries, Trachea, Trauma Centers, Treatment Outcome, Wounds, Nonpenetrating
Show Abstract · Added February 3, 2018
Tracheobronchial injuries can be difficult to diagnose and manage, especially in the presence of polytrauma. A 50-year-old woman presented as a Level I trauma activation after being struck by a motor vehicle. Initial evaluation demonstrated intracranial hemorrhage and multiple chest injuries, including multilevel bilateral rib fractures, pneumomediastinum, and concern for tracheobronchial injury. After initial stabilization, bronchoscopy was performed and demonstrated an injury to the carina. We report a novel airway and ventilation strategy in the setting of concomitant tracheobronchial injury after severe blunt chest trauma in which extracorporeal support is contraindicated.
Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Variation in Radiologic and Urologic Computed Tomography Interpretation of Urinary Tract Stone Burden: Results From the Registry for Stones of the Kidney and Ureter.
Tzou DT, Isaacson D, Usawachintachit M, Wang ZJ, Taguchi K, Hills NK, Hsi RS, Sherer BA, Reliford-Titus S, Duty B, Harper JD, Sorensen M, Sur RL, Stoller ML, Chi T
(2018) Urology 111: 59-64
MeSH Terms: Diagnostic Techniques, Urological, Female, Humans, Kidney Calculi, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Radiography, Registries, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Ureteral Calculi
Show Abstract · Added January 16, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To compare the measured stone burden recorded between urologists and radiologists, and examine how these differences could potentially impact stone management. As current urologic stone surgery guideline recommendations are based on stone size, accurate stone measurements are crucial to direct appropriate treatment. This study investigated the discrepant interpretation that often exists between urologic surgeons and radiologists' estimation of patient urinary stone burden.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - From November 2015 through August 2016, new patients prospectively enrolled into the Registry for Stones of the Kidney and Ureter (ReSKU) were included if they had computed tomography images available and an accompanying official radiologic report at the time of their urologist provider visit. Stone number and aggregate stone size were compared between the urologic interpretation and the corresponding radiologic reports.
RESULTS - Of 219 patients who met the inclusion criteria, concordance between urologic and radiologic assessment of aggregate stone size was higher for single stone sizing (63%) compared with multiple stones (32%). Statistical significance was found in comparing the mean difference in aggregate stone size for single and multiple stones (P <.01). Over 33% of stone-containing renal units had a radiologic report with an unclear size estimation or size discrepancy that could lead to non-guideline-driven surgical management.
CONCLUSION - Significant variation exists between urologic and radiologic computed tomography interpretations of stone burden. Urologists should personally review patient imaging when considering stone surgical management. A standardized method for measuring and reporting stone parameters is needed among urologists and radiologists.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Community-Acquired Pneumonia Visualized on CT Scans but Not Chest Radiographs: Pathogens, Severity, and Clinical Outcomes.
Upchurch CP, Grijalva CG, Wunderink RG, Williams DJ, Waterer GW, Anderson EJ, Zhu Y, Hart EM, Carroll F, Bramley AM, Jain S, Edwards KM, Self WH
(2018) Chest 153: 601-610
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anti-Infective Agents, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Radiography, Thoracic, Respiration, Artificial, Severity of Illness Index, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, United States
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - The clinical significance of pneumonia visualized on CT scan in the setting of a normal chest radiograph is uncertain.
METHODS - In a multicenter prospective surveillance study of adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), we compared the presenting clinical features, pathogens present, and outcomes of patients with pneumonia visualized on a CT scan but not on a concurrent chest radiograph (CT-only pneumonia) and those with pneumonia visualized on a chest radiograph. All patients underwent chest radiography; the decision to obtain CT imaging was determined by the treating clinicians. Chest radiographs and CT images were interpreted by study-dedicated thoracic radiologists blinded to the clinical data.
RESULTS - The study population included 2,251 adults with CAP; 2,185 patients (97%) had pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, whereas 66 patients (3%) had pneumonia visualized on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiography. Overall, these patients with CT-only pneumonia had a clinical profile similar to those with pneumonia visualized on chest radiography, including comorbidities, vital signs, hospital length of stay, prevalence of viral (30% vs 26%) and bacterial (12% vs 14%) pathogens, ICU admission (23% vs 21%), use of mechanical ventilation (6% vs 5%), septic shock (5% vs 4%), and inhospital mortality (0 vs 2%).
CONCLUSIONS - Adults hospitalized with CAP who had radiological evidence of pneumonia on CT scan but not on concurrent chest radiograph had pathogens, disease severity, and outcomes similar to patients who had signs of pneumonia on chest radiography. These findings support using the same management principles for patients with CT-only pneumonia and those with pneumonia seen on chest radiography.
Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
The effect of high intensity statin use on liver density: A post hoc analysis of the coronary artery calcification treatment with zocor [CATZ] study.
Sarkar S, Terry JG, Ikizler TA, Crouse JR, Carr JJ, Hung AM
(2016) Obes Res Clin Pract 10: 613-615
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Coronary Artery Disease, Disease Progression, Female, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Liver, Male, Middle Aged, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Radiography, Abdominal, Simvastatin, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Added September 29, 2016
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17 MeSH Terms
Radiological Image Traits Predictive of Cancer Status in Pulmonary Nodules.
Liu Y, Balagurunathan Y, Atwater T, Antic S, Li Q, Walker RC, Smith GT, Massion PP, Schabath MB, Gillies RJ
(2017) Clin Cancer Res 23: 1442-1449
MeSH Terms: Aged, Female, Humans, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Radiography, Solitary Pulmonary Nodule, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2018
We propose a systematic methodology to quantify incidentally identified pulmonary nodules based on observed radiological traits (semantics) quantified on a point scale and a machine-learning method using these data to predict cancer status. We investigated 172 patients who had low-dose CT images, with 102 and 70 patients grouped into training and validation cohorts, respectively. On the images, 24 radiological traits were systematically scored and a linear classifier was built to relate the traits to malignant status. The model was formed both with and without size descriptors to remove bias due to nodule size. The multivariate pairs formed on the training set were tested on an independent validation data set to evaluate their performance. The best 4-feature set that included a size measurement (set 1), was short axis, contour, concavity, and texture, which had an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.88 (accuracy = 81%, sensitivity = 76.2%, specificity = 91.7%). If size measures were excluded, the four best features (set 2) were location, fissure attachment, lobulation, and spiculation, which had an AUROC of 0.83 (accuracy = 73.2%, sensitivity = 73.8%, specificity = 81.7%) in predicting malignancy in primary nodules. The validation test AUROC was 0.8 (accuracy = 74.3%, sensitivity = 66.7%, specificity = 75.6%) and 0.74 (accuracy = 71.4%, sensitivity = 61.9%, specificity = 75.5%) for sets 1 and 2, respectively. Radiological image traits are useful in predicting malignancy in lung nodules. These semantic traits can be used in combination with size-based measures to enhance prediction accuracy and reduce false-positives. .
©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.
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11 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of Six Registration Methods for the Human Abdomen on Clinically Acquired CT.
Xu Z, Lee CP, Heinrich MP, Modat M, Rueckert D, Ourselin S, Abramson RG, Landman BA
(2016) IEEE Trans Biomed Eng 63: 1563-72
MeSH Terms: Abdomen, Algorithms, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Radiography, Abdominal, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added November 2, 2016
OBJECTIVE - This work evaluates current 3-D image registration tools on clinically acquired abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans.
METHODS - Thirteen abdominal organs were manually labeled on a set of 100 CT images, and the 100 labeled images (i.e., atlases) were pairwise registered based on intensity information with six registration tools (FSL, ANTS-CC, ANTS-QUICK-MI, IRTK, NIFTYREG, and DEEDS). The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), mean surface distance, and Hausdorff distance were calculated on the registered organs individually. Permutation tests and indifference-zone ranking were performed to examine the statistical and practical significance, respectively.
RESULTS - The results suggest that DEEDS yielded the best registration performance. However, due to the overall low DSC values, and substantial portion of low-performing outliers, great care must be taken when image registration is used for local interpretation of abdominal CT.
CONCLUSION - There is substantial room for improvement in image registration for abdominal CT.
SIGNIFICANCE - All data and source code are available so that innovations in registration can be directly compared with the current generation of tools without excessive duplication of effort.
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6 MeSH Terms
Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.
Getahun H, Matteelli A, Abubakar I, Aziz MA, Baddeley A, Barreira D, Den Boon S, Borroto Gutierrez SM, Bruchfeld J, Burhan E, Cavalcante S, Cedillos R, Chaisson R, Chee CB, Chesire L, Corbett E, Dara M, Denholm J, de Vries G, Falzon D, Ford N, Gale-Rowe M, Gilpin C, Girardi E, Go UY, Govindasamy D, D Grant A, Grzemska M, Harris R, Horsburgh CR, Ismayilov A, Jaramillo E, Kik S, Kranzer K, Lienhardt C, LoBue P, Lönnroth K, Marks G, Menzies D, Migliori GB, Mosca D, Mukadi YD, Mwinga A, Nelson L, Nishikiori N, Oordt-Speets A, Rangaka MX, Reis A, Rotz L, Sandgren A, Sañé Schepisi M, Schünemann HJ, Sharma SK, Sotgiu G, Stagg HR, Sterling TR, Tayeb T, Uplekar M, van der Werf MJ, Vandevelde W, van Kessel F, van't Hoog A, Varma JK, Vezhnina N, Voniatis C, Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten M, Weil D, Weyer K, Wilkinson RJ, Yoshiyama T, Zellweger JP, Raviglione M
(2015) Eur Respir J 46: 1563-76
MeSH Terms: Antirheumatic Agents, Antitubercular Agents, Coinfection, Comorbidity, Disease Management, Drug Users, Emigrants and Immigrants, Evidence-Based Medicine, HIV Infections, Health Personnel, Homeless Persons, Humans, Interferon-gamma Release Tests, Isoniazid, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Latent Tuberculosis, Mass Screening, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prisoners, Public Health, Radiography, Thoracic, Renal Dialysis, Rifampin, Risk Assessment, Silicosis, Substance-Related Disorders, Transplant Recipients, Tuberculin Test, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, World Health Organization
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone.
Copyright ©ERS 2015.
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30 MeSH Terms
Subclinical Atherosclerosis Is Inversely Associated With Gray Matter Volume in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes.
Freedman BI, Divers J, Whitlow CT, Bowden DW, Palmer ND, Smith SC, Xu J, Register TC, Carr JJ, Wagner BC, Williamson JD, Sink KM, Maldjian JA
(2015) Diabetes Care 38: 2158-65
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Aged, Atherosclerosis, Blood Glucose, Cognition, Cognition Disorders, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Gray Matter, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Organ Size, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Radiography
Show Abstract · Added September 29, 2016
OBJECTIVE - Relative to European Americans, African Americans manifest lower levels of computed tomography-based calcified atherosclerotic plaque (CP), a measure of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD). Potential relationships between CP and cerebral structure are poorly defined in the African American population. We assessed associations among glycemic control, inflammation, and CP with cerebral structure on MRI and with cognitive performance in 268 high-risk African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Associations among hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), C-reactive protein (CRP), and CP in coronary arteries, carotid arteries, and the aorta with MRI volumetric analysis (white matter volume, gray matter volume [GMV], cerebrospinal fluid volume, and white matter lesion volume) were assessed using generalized linear models adjusted for age, sex, African ancestry proportion, smoking, BMI, use of statins, HbA1c, hypertension, and prior CVD.
RESULTS - Participants were 63.4% female with mean (SD) age of 59.8 years (9.2), diabetes duration of 14.5 years (7.6), HbA1c of 7.95% (1.9), estimated glomerular filtration rate of 86.6 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (24.6), and coronary artery CP mass score of 215 mg (502). In fully adjusted models, GMV was inversely associated with coronary artery CP (parameter estimate [β] -0.47 [SE 0.15], P = 0.002; carotid artery CP (β -1.92 [SE 0.62], P = 0.002; and aorta CP [β -0.10 [SE 0.03] P = 0.002), whereas HbA1c and CRP did not associate with cerebral volumes. Coronary artery CP also associated with poorer global cognitive function on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.
CONCLUSIONS - Subclinical atherosclerosis was associated with smaller GMV and poorer cognitive performance in African Americans with diabetes. Cardioprotective strategies could preserve GMV and cognitive function in high-risk African Americans with diabetes.
© 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
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16 MeSH Terms