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Genetic Variants Associated with Circulating Fibroblast Growth Factor 23.
Robinson-Cohen C, Bartz TM, Lai D, Ikizler TA, Peacock M, Imel EA, Michos ED, Foroud TM, Akesson K, Taylor KD, Malmgren L, Matsushita K, Nethander M, Eriksson J, Ohlsson C, Mellström D, Wolf M, Ljunggren O, McGuigan F, Rotter JI, Karlsson M, Econs MJ, Ix JH, Lutsey PL, Psaty BM, de Boer IH, Kestenbaum BR
(2018) J Am Soc Nephrol 29: 2583-2592
MeSH Terms: African Continental Ancestry Group, Cohort Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Kidney, Male, Phosphates, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, RGS Proteins, Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Proteins, Type IIa, Vitamin D, Vitamin D3 24-Hydroxylase
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
BACKGROUND - Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone that regulates phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism, contributes to the pathogenesis of mineral and bone disorders in CKD and is an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. Central elements of FGF23 regulation remain incompletely understood; genetic variation may help explain interindividual differences.
METHODS - We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of circulating FGF23 concentrations among 16,624 participants of European ancestry from seven cohort studies, excluding participants with eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m to focus on FGF23 under normal conditions. We evaluated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with natural log-transformed FGF23 concentration, adjusted for age, sex, study site, and principal components of ancestry. A second model additionally adjusted for BMI and eGFR.
RESULTS - We discovered 154 SNPs from five independent regions associated with FGF23 concentration. The SNP with the strongest association, rs17216707 (=3.0×10), lies upstream of , which encodes the primary catabolic enzyme for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Each additional copy of the T allele at this locus is associated with 5% higher FGF23 concentration. Another locus strongly associated with variations in FGF23 concentration is rs11741640, within and upstream of (a gene involved in renal phosphate transport). Additional adjustment for BMI and eGFR did not materially alter the magnitude of these associations. Another top locus (within , the ABO blood group transferase gene) was no longer statistically significant at the genome-wide level.
CONCLUSIONS - Common genetic variants located near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and renal phosphate transport are associated with differences in circulating FGF23 concentrations.
Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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15 MeSH Terms
M4 Muscarinic Receptor Signaling Ameliorates Striatal Plasticity Deficits in Models of L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia.
Shen W, Plotkin JL, Francardo V, Ko WK, Xie Z, Li Q, Fieblinger T, Wess J, Neubig RR, Lindsley CW, Conn PJ, Greengard P, Bezard E, Cenci MA, Surmeier DJ
(2015) Neuron 88: 762-73
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Animals, Cerebral Cortex, Disease Models, Animal, Dopamine Agents, Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced, Glutamic Acid, Levodopa, Long-Term Potentiation, Long-Term Synaptic Depression, Macaca mulatta, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Neostriatum, Neuronal Plasticity, Neurons, Parkinsonian Disorders, RGS Proteins, Receptor, Muscarinic M4, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
A balanced interaction between dopaminergic and cholinergic signaling in the striatum is critical to goal-directed behavior. But how this interaction modulates corticostriatal synaptic plasticity underlying learned actions remains unclear--particularly in direct-pathway spiny projection neurons (dSPNs). Our studies show that in dSPNs, endogenous cholinergic signaling through M4 muscarinic receptors (M4Rs) promoted long-term depression of corticostriatal glutamatergic synapses, by suppressing regulator of G protein signaling type 4 (RGS4) activity, and blocked D1 dopamine receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Furthermore, in a mouse model of L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD), boosting M4R signaling with positive allosteric modulator (PAM) blocked aberrant LTP in dSPNs, enabled LTP reversal, and attenuated dyskinetic behaviors. An M4R PAM also was effective in a primate LID model. Taken together, these studies identify an important signaling pathway controlling striatal synaptic plasticity and point to a novel pharmacological strategy for alleviating LID in PD patients.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Suppression of the GTPase-activating protein RGS10 increases Rheb-GTP and mTOR signaling in ovarian cancer cells.
Altman MK, Alshamrani AA, Jia W, Nguyen HT, Fambrough JM, Tran SK, Patel MB, Hoseinzadeh P, Beedle AM, Murph MM
(2015) Cancer Lett 369: 175-83
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, Female, Humans, Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins, Neuropeptides, Ovarian Neoplasms, Phosphorylation, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, RGS Proteins, Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain Protein, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added September 20, 2016
The regulator of G protein signaling 10 (RGS10) protein is a GTPase activating protein that accelerates the hydrolysis of GTP and therefore canonically inactivates G proteins, ultimately terminating signaling. Rheb is a small GTPase protein that shuttles between its GDP- and GTP-bound forms to activate mTOR. Since RGS10 suppression augments ovarian cancer cell viability, we sought to elucidate the molecular mechanism. Following RGS10 suppression in serum-free conditions, phosphorylation of mTOR, the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), p70S6K and S6 Ribosomal Protein appear. Furthermore, suppressing RGS10 increases activated Rheb, suggesting RGS10 antagonizes mTOR signaling via the small G-protein. The effects of RGS10 suppression are enhanced after stimulating cells with the growth factor, lysophosphatidic acid, and reduced with mTOR inhibitors, temsirolimus and INK-128. Suppression of RGS10 leads to an increase in cell proliferation, even in the presence of etoposide. In summary, the RGS10 suppression increases Rheb-GTP and mTOR signaling in ovarian cancer cells. Our results suggest that RGS10 could serve in a novel, and previously unknown, role by accelerating the hydrolysis of GTP from Rheb in ovarian cancer cells.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
GRK3 suppresses L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the rat model of Parkinson's disease via its RGS homology domain.
Ahmed MR, Bychkov E, Li L, Gurevich VV, Gurevich EV
(2015) Sci Rep 5: 10920
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Corpus Striatum, Disease Models, Animal, Dyskinesias, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 3, Gene Expression, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Levodopa, Parkinson Disease, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, RGS Proteins, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering, Rats, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Degeneration of dopaminergic neurons causes Parkinson's disease. Dopamine replacement therapy with L-DOPA is the best available treatment. However, patients develop L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). In the hemiparkinsonian rat, chronic L-DOPA increases rotations and abnormal involuntary movements modeling LID, via supersensitive dopamine receptors. Dopamine receptors are controlled by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Here we demonstrate that LID is attenuated by overexpression of GRK3 in the striatum, whereas knockdown of GRK3 by microRNA exacerbated it. Kinase-dead GRK3 and its separated RGS homology domain (RH) suppressed sensitization to L-DOPA, whereas GRK3 with disabled RH did not. RH alleviated LID without compromising anti-akinetic effect of L-DOPA. RH binds striatal Gq. GRK3, kinase-dead GRK3, and RH inhibited accumulation of ∆FosB, a marker of LID. RH-dead mutant was ineffective, whereas GRK3 knockdown exacerbated ∆FosB accumulation. Our findings reveal a novel mechanism of GRK3 control of the dopamine receptor signaling and the role of Gq in LID.
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16 MeSH Terms
Regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) promotes anxiety and depression by attenuating serotonin-mediated activation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis.
Stewart A, Maity B, Wunsch AM, Meng F, Wu Q, Wemmie JA, Fisher RA
(2014) FASEB J 28: 1735-44
MeSH Terms: 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, Adenylyl Cyclases, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Anxiety, Cells, Cultured, Cerebral Cortex, Depression, Female, Fluvoxamine, Hippocampus, Immunoblotting, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Mice, Phosphorylation, Piperazines, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Pyridines, RGS Proteins, Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT1A, Serotonin, Serotonin Antagonists, Serotonin Receptor Agonists, Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added August 7, 2014
Targeting serotonin (5-HT) bioavailability with selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remains the most widely used treatment for mood disorders. However, their limited efficacy, delayed onset of action, and side effects restrict their clinical utility. Endogenous regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins have been implicated as key inhibitors of 5-HT(1A)Rs, whose activation is believed to underlie the beneficial effects of SSRIs, but the identity of the specific RGS proteins involved remains unknown. We identify RGS6 as the critical negative regulator of 5-HT(1A)R-dependent antidepressant actions. RGS6 is enriched in hippocampal and cortical neurons, 5-HT(1A)R-expressing cells implicated in mood disorders. RGS6(-/-) mice exhibit spontaneous anxiolytic and antidepressant behavior rapidly and completely reversibly by 5-HT(1A)R blockade. Effects of the SSRI fluvoxamine and 5-HT(1A)R agonist 8-OH-DPAT were also potentiated in RGS6(+/-) mice. The phenotype of RGS6(-/-) mice was associated with decreased CREB phosphorylation in the hippocampus and cortex, implicating enhanced Gα(i)-dependent adenylyl cyclase inhibition as a possible causative factor in the behavior observed in RGS6(-/-) animals. Our results demonstrate that by inhibiting serotonergic innervation of the cortical-limbic neuronal circuit, RGS6 exerts powerful anxiogenic and prodepressant actions. These findings indicate that RGS6 inhibition may represent a viable means to treat mood disorders or enhance the efficacy of serotonergic agents.
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26 MeSH Terms
Regulator of G protein signaling 6 is a novel suppressor of breast tumor initiation and progression.
Maity B, Stewart A, O'Malley Y, Askeland RW, Sugg SL, Fisher RA
(2013) Carcinogenesis 34: 1747-55
MeSH Terms: 9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene, Animals, Apoptosis, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, Breast Neoplasms, Carcinogenesis, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA Damage, Disease Progression, Epithelial Cells, ErbB Receptors, Female, Humans, MCF-7 Cells, Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, RGS Proteins, Reactive Oxygen Species, Receptors, Estrogen, Signal Transduction, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added August 7, 2014
Breast cancer is a large global health burden and the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women worldwide. Here, we utilize RGS6(-/-) mice to interrogate the role of regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6), localized to the ductal epithelium in mouse and human breast, as a novel tumor suppressor in vivo. RGS6(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated 7,12-dimethylbenza[α]anthracene (DMBA)-induced tumor initiation and progression, as well as decreased overall survival. Analysis of carcinogenic aberrations in the mammary glands of DMBA-treated mice revealed a failure of the DNA damage response concurrent with augmented oncogenesis in RGS6(-/-) animals. Furthermore, RGS6 suppressed cell growth induced by either human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 or estrogen receptor activation in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and mammary epithelial cells (MECs). MECs isolated from RGS6(-/-) mice also showed a deficit in DMBA-induced ATM/p53 activation, reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis confirming that RGS6 is required for effective activation of the DNA damage response in these cells, a critical countermeasure against carcinogen-mediated genotoxic stress. The ability of RGS6 to simultaneously enhance DNA-damage-induced apoptotic signaling and suppress oncogenic cell growth likely underlie the accelerated tumorigenesis and cellular transformation observed in DMBA-treated RGS6(-/-) mice and isolated MECs, respectively. Unsurprisingly, spontaneous tumor formation was also seen in old female RGS6(-/-) but not in wild-type mice. Our finding that RGS6 is downregulated in all human breast cancer subtypes independent of their molecular classification indicates that obtaining a means to restore the growth suppressive and pro-apoptotic actions of RGS6 in breast might be a viable means to treat a large spectrum of breast tumors.
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22 MeSH Terms
G-protein inactivator RGS6 mediates myocardial cell apoptosis and cardiomyopathy caused by doxorubicin.
Yang J, Maity B, Huang J, Gao Z, Stewart A, Weiss RM, Anderson ME, Fisher RA
(2013) Cancer Res 73: 1662-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Apoptosis, Cardiomyopathies, Doxorubicin, GTP-Binding Proteins, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myocardium, RGS Proteins, Reactive Oxygen Species
Show Abstract · Added August 7, 2014
Clinical use of the widely used chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin is limited by life-threatening cardiotoxicity. The mechanisms underlying doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy and heart failure remain unclear but are thought to involve p53-mediated myocardial cell apoptosis. The tripartite G-protein inactivating protein RGS6 has been implicated in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, ATM/p53 activation, and apoptosis in doxorubicin-treated cells. Thus, we hypothesized that RGS6, the expression of which is enriched in cardiac tissue, might also be responsible for the pathologic effects of doxorubicin treatment in heart. In this study, we show that RGS6 expression is induced strongly by doxorubicin in the ventricles of mice and isolated ventricular myocytes via a posttranscriptional mechanism. While doxorubicin-treated wild-type (WT) mice manifested severe left ventricular dysfunction, loss of heart and body mass, along with decreased survival 5 days after doxorubicin administration, mice lacking RGS6 were completely protected against these pathogenic responses. Activation of ATM/p53 apoptosis signaling by doxorubicin in ventricles of WT mice was also absent in their RGS6(-/-) counterparts. Doxorubicin-induced ROS generation was dramatically impaired in both the ventricles and ventricular myocytes isolated from RGS6(-/-) mice, and the apoptotic response to doxorubicin in ventricular myocytes required RGS6-dependent ROS production. These results identify RGS6 as an essential mediator of the pathogenic responses to doxorubicin in heart, and they argue that RGS6 inhibition offers a rational means to circumvent doxorubicin cardiotoxicity in human patients with cancer.
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13 MeSH Terms
Regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6) protein ensures coordination of motor movement by modulating GABAB receptor signaling.
Maity B, Stewart A, Yang J, Loo L, Sheff D, Shepherd AJ, Mohapatra DP, Fisher RA
(2012) J Biol Chem 287: 4972-81
MeSH Terms: Animals, Baclofen, Cerebellar Ataxia, Cerebellum, G Protein-Coupled Inwardly-Rectifying Potassium Channels, GABA-B Receptor Agonists, GABAergic Neurons, GTP-Binding Protein beta Subunits, Humans, Locomotion, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Motor Activity, Multiprotein Complexes, Nerve Tissue Proteins, RGS Proteins, Receptors, GABA-B, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added August 7, 2014
γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons located within the cerebellar cortex limits the extent of neuronal excitation in part through activation of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors. Stimulation of these receptors triggers a number of downstream signaling events, including activation of GIRK channels by the Gβγ dimer resulting in membrane hyperpolarization and inhibition of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic sites. Here, we identify RGS6, a member of the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins, as a key regulator of GABA(B)R signaling in cerebellum. RGS6 is enriched in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum along with neuronal GIRK channel subunits 1 and 2 where RGS6 forms a complex with known binding partners Gβ(5) and R7BP. Mice lacking RGS6 exhibit abnormal gait and ataxia characterized by impaired rotarod performance improved by treatment with a GABA(B)R antagonist. RGS6(-/-) mice administered baclofen also showed exaggerated motor coordination deficits compared with their wild-type counterparts. Isolated cerebellar neurons natively expressed RGS6, GABA(B)R, and GIRK channel subunits, and cerebellar granule neurons from RGS6(-/-) mice showed a significant delay in the deactivation kinetics of baclofen-induced GIRK channel currents. These results establish RGS6 as a key component of GABA(B)R signaling and represent the first demonstration of an essential role for modulatory actions of RGS proteins in adult cerebellum. Dysregulation of RGS6 expression in human patients could potentially contribute to loss of motor coordination and, thus, pharmacological manipulation of RGS6 levels might represent a viable means to treat patients with ataxias of cerebellar origin.
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18 MeSH Terms
Rgs2 mediates pro-angiogenic function of myeloid derived suppressor cells in the tumor microenvironment via upregulation of MCP-1.
Boelte KC, Gordy LE, Joyce S, Thompson MA, Yang L, Lin PC
(2011) PLoS One 6: e18534
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Death, Cell Differentiation, Cell Movement, Cell Proliferation, Chemokine CCL2, Endothelial Cells, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Cells, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, RGS Proteins, Signal Transduction, Tumor Microenvironment, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
BACKGROUND - Tumor growth is intimately linked with stromal interactions. Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are dramatically elevated in cancer patients and tumor bearing mice. MDSCs modulate the tumor microenvironment through attenuating host immune response and increasing vascularization.
METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS - In searching for molecular mediators responsible for pro-tumor functions, we found that regulator of G protein signaling-2 (Rgs2) is highly increased in tumor-derived MDSCs compared to control MDSCs. We further demonstrate that hypoxia, a common feature associated with solid tumors, upregulates the gene expression. Genetic deletion of Rgs2 in mice resulted in a significant retardation of tumor growth, and the tumors exhibit decreased vascular density and increased cell death. Interestingly, deletion of Rgs2 in MDSCs completely abolished their tumor promoting function, suggesting that Rgs2 signaling in MDSCs is responsible for the tumor promoting function. Cytokine array profiling identified that Rgs2-/- tumor MDSCs produce less MCP-1, leading to decreased angiogenesis, which could be restored with addition of recombinant MCP-1.
CONCLUSION - Our data reveal Rgs2 as a critical regulator of the pro-angiogenic function of MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment, through regulating MCP-1 production.
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19 MeSH Terms
Regulators of G-Protein signaling RGS10 and RGS17 regulate chemoresistance in ovarian cancer cells.
Hooks SB, Callihan P, Altman MK, Hurst JH, Ali MW, Murph MM
(2010) Mol Cancer 9: 289
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, Cisplatin, Computational Biology, Docetaxel, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Female, Humans, Lysophospholipids, Ovarian Neoplasms, Polymerase Chain Reaction, RGS Proteins, Signal Transduction, Taxoids, Vincristine
Show Abstract · Added September 20, 2016
BACKGROUND - A critical therapeutic challenge in epithelial ovarian carcinoma is the development of chemoresistance among tumor cells following exposure to first line chemotherapeutics. The molecular and genetic changes that drive the development of chemoresistance are unknown, and this lack of mechanistic insight is a major obstacle in preventing and predicting the occurrence of refractory disease. We have recently shown that Regulators of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins negatively regulate signaling by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor elevated in malignant ascites fluid that triggers oncogenic growth and survival signaling in ovarian cancer cells. The goal of this study was to determine the role of RGS protein expression in ovarian cancer chemoresistance.
RESULTS - In this study, we find that RGS2, RGS5, RGS10 and RGS17 transcripts are expressed at significantly lower levels in cells resistant to chemotherapy compared with parental, chemo-sensitive cells in gene expression datasets of multiple models of chemoresistance. Further, exposure of SKOV-3 cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy causes acute, persistent downregulation of RGS10 and RGS17 transcript expression. Direct inhibition of RGS10 or RGS17 expression using siRNA knock-down significantly reduces chemotherapy-induced cell toxicity. The effects of cisplatin, vincristine, and docetaxel are inhibited following RGS10 and RGS17 knock-down in cell viability assays and phosphatidyl serine externalization assays in SKOV-3 cells and MDR-HeyA8 cells. We further show that AKT activation is higher following RGS10 knock-down and RGS 10 and RGS17 overexpression blocked LPA mediated activation of AKT, suggesting that RGS proteins may blunt AKT survival pathways.
CONCLUSIONS - Taken together, our data suggest that chemotherapy exposure triggers loss of RGS10 and RGS17 expression in ovarian cancer cells, and that loss of expression contributes to the development of chemoresistance, possibly through amplification of endogenous AKT signals. Our results establish RGS10 and RGS17 as novel regulators of cell survival and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer cells and suggest that their reduced expression may be diagnostic of chemoresistance.
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16 MeSH Terms