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Discovery and Structure-Based Optimization of Potent and Selective WD Repeat Domain 5 (WDR5) Inhibitors Containing a Dihydroisoquinolinone Bicyclic Core.
Tian J, Teuscher KB, Aho ER, Alvarado JR, Mills JJ, Meyers KM, Gogliotti RD, Han C, Macdonald JD, Sai J, Shaw JG, Sensintaffar JL, Zhao B, Rietz TA, Thomas LR, Payne WG, Moore WJ, Stott GM, Kondo J, Inoue M, Coffey RJ, Tansey WP, Stauffer SR, Lee T, Fesik SW
(2020) J Med Chem 63: 656-675
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Bridged Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic, Cell Cycle, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Chromatin, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drug Design, Drug Discovery, Epigenetic Repression, Genes, myc, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Quinolones, Structure-Activity Relationship, WD40 Repeats
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5) is a member of the WD40-repeat protein family that plays a critical role in multiple chromatin-centric processes. Overexpression of WDR5 correlates with a poor clinical outcome in many human cancers, and WDR5 itself has emerged as an attractive target for therapy. Most drug-discovery efforts center on the WIN site of WDR5 that is responsible for the recruitment of WDR5 to chromatin. Here, we describe discovery of a novel WDR5 WIN site antagonists containing a dihydroisoquinolinone bicyclic core using a structure-based design. These compounds exhibit picomolar binding affinity and selective concentration-dependent antiproliferative activities in sensitive MLL-fusion cell lines. Furthermore, these WDR5 WIN site binders inhibit proliferation in MYC-driven cancer cells and reduce MYC recruitment to chromatin at MYC/WDR5 co-bound genes. Thus, these molecules are useful probes to study the implication of WDR5 inhibition in cancers and serve as a potential starting point toward the discovery of anti-WDR5 therapeutics.
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16 MeSH Terms
Apotransferrin in Combination with Ciprofloxacin Slows Bacterial Replication, Prevents Resistance Amplification, and Increases Antimicrobial Regimen Effect.
Ambrose PG, VanScoy BD, Luna BM, Yan J, Ulhaq A, Nielsen TB, Rudin S, Hujer K, Bonomo RA, Actis L, Skaar E, Spellberg B
(2019) Antimicrob Agents Chemother 63:
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Apoproteins, Ciprofloxacin, Fluoroquinolones, Klebsiella, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Transferrin
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
There has been renewed interest in combining traditional small-molecule antimicrobial agents with nontraditional therapies to potentiate antimicrobial effects. Apotransferrin, which decreases iron availability to microbes, is one such approach. We conducted a 48-h one-compartment infection model to explore the impact of apotransferrin on the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin. The challenge panel included four isolates with ciprofloxacin MIC values ranging from 0.08 to 32 mg/liter. Each challenge isolate was subjected to an ineffective ciprofloxacin monotherapy exposure (free-drug area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h divided by the MIC [AUC/MIC ratio] ranging from 0.19 to 96.6) with and without apotransferrin. As expected, the no-treatment and apotransferrin control arms showed unaltered prototypical logarithmic bacterial growth. We identified relationships between exposure and change in bacterial density for ciprofloxacin alone ( = 0.64) and ciprofloxacin in combination with apotransferrin ( = 0.84). Addition of apotransferrin to ciprofloxacin enabled a remarkable reduction in bacterial density across a wide range of ciprofloxacin exposures. For instance, at a ciprofloxacin AUC/MIC ratio of 20, ciprofloxacin monotherapy resulted in nearly 2 log CFU increase in bacterial density, while the combination of apotransferrin and ciprofloxacin resulted in 2 log CFU reduction in bacterial density. Furthermore, addition of apotransferrin significantly reduced the emergence of ciprofloxacin-resistant subpopulations compared to monotherapy. These data demonstrate that decreasing the rate of bacterial replication with apotransferrin in combination with antimicrobial therapy represents an opportunity to increase the magnitude of the bactericidal effect and to suppress the growth rate of drug-resistant subpopulations.
Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology.
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7 MeSH Terms
Cobicistat Versus Ritonavir: Similar Pharmacokinetic Enhancers But Some Important Differences.
Tseng A, Hughes CA, Wu J, Seet J, Phillips EJ
(2017) Ann Pharmacother 51: 1008-1022
MeSH Terms: Anti-HIV Agents, Atazanavir Sulfate, Cobicistat, Darunavir, Drug Interactions, HIV Infections, Humans, Quinolones, Ritonavir
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
OBJECTIVE - To describe properties of cobicistat and ritonavir; compare boosting data with atazanavir, darunavir, and elvitegravir; and summarize antiretroviral and comedication interaction studies, with a focus on similarities and differences between ritonavir and cobicistat. Considerations when switching from one booster to another are discussed.
DATA SOURCES - A literature search of MEDLINE was performed (1985 to April 2017) using the following search terms: cobicistat, ritonavir, pharmacokinetic, drug interactions, booster, pharmacokinetic enhancer, HIV, antiretrovirals. Abstracts from conferences, article bibliographies, and product monographs were reviewed.
STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION - Relevant English-language studies or those conducted in humans were considered.
DATA SYNTHESIS - Similar exposures of elvitegravir, darunavir, and atazanavir are achieved when combined with cobicistat or ritonavir. Cobicistat may not be as potent a CYP3A4 inhibitor as ritonavir in the presence of a concomitant inducer. Ritonavir induces CYP1A2, 2B6, 2C9, 2C19, and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase, whereas cobicistat does not. Therefore, recommendations for cobicistat with comedications that are extrapolated from studies using ritonavir may not be valid. Pharmacokinetic properties of the boosted antiretroviral can also affect interaction outcome with comedications. Problems can arise when switching patients from ritonavir to cobicistat regimens, particularly with medications that have a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin.
CONCLUSIONS - When assessing and managing potential interactions with ritonavir- or cobicistat-based regimens, clinicians need to be aware of important differences and distinctions between these agents. This is especially important for patients with multiple comorbidities and concomitant medications. Additional monitoring or medication dose adjustments may be needed when switching from one booster to another.
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Fluoroquinolones for the treatment and prevention of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.
Sterling TR
(2016) Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 20: 42-47
MeSH Terms: Antitubercular Agents, Clinical Trials as Topic, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fluoroquinolones, Humans, Levofloxacin, Moxifloxacin, Treatment Outcome, Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) play an important role in the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), there are several issues that need to be addressed to optimize their effectiveness and minimize toxicity. This includes identification of the optimal dose of FQs such as levofloxacin (LVX) and moxifloxacin, and the optimal role of FQs in combination with other anti-tuberculosis drugs, particularly those with overlapping toxicity, such as QT prolongation. While the ability of FQs to penetrate into cavities and granulomas is likely beneficial, suboptimal sensitivity of genotypic tests to detect FQ resistance could negatively affect treatment outcomes of FQ-containing regimens. Several trials are underway to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of FQs as part of combination MDR-TB therapy; there are also two planned studies of LVX to prevent tuberculosis among close contacts of MDR-TB.
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9 MeSH Terms
Design of 4-Oxo-1-aryl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamides as Selective Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 2.
Felts AS, Rodriguez AL, Smith KA, Engers JL, Morrison RD, Byers FW, Blobaum AL, Locuson CW, Chang S, Venable DF, Niswender CM, Daniels JS, Conn PJ, Lindsley CW, Emmitte KA
(2015) J Med Chem 58: 9027-40
MeSH Terms: Animals, Central Nervous System, Drug Discovery, Mice, Protein Binding, Quinolines, Quinolones, Rats, Receptor, Muscarinic M1, Receptors, Metabotropic Glutamate, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Both orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) have been used to establish a link between mGlu2/3 inhibition and a variety of CNS diseases and disorders. Though these tools typically have good selectivity for mGlu2/3 versus the remaining six members of the mGlu family, compounds that are selective for only one of the individual group II mGlus have proved elusive. Herein we report on the discovery of a potent and highly selective mGlu2 negative allosteric modulator 58 (VU6001192) from a series of 4-oxo-1-aryl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamides. The concept for the design of this series centered on morphing a quinoline series recently disclosed in the patent literature into a chemotype previously used for the preparation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 1 positive allosteric modulators. Compound 58 exhibits a favorable profile and will be a useful tool for understanding the biological implications of selective inhibition of mGlu2 in the CNS.
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Role for the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Top-Down Cognitive Processing Using a Touchscreen Visual Discrimination Task in Mice.
Gould RW, Dencker D, Grannan M, Bubser M, Zhan X, Wess J, Xiang Z, Locuson C, Lindsley CW, Conn PJ, Jones CK
(2015) ACS Chem Neurosci 6: 1683-95
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Animals, Cholinergic Agents, Cognition Disorders, Conditioning, Operant, Discrimination, Psychological, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Gene Expression Regulation, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Pattern Recognition, Visual, Photic Stimulation, Quinolones, RNA, Messenger, Receptor, Muscarinic M1, Reinforcement Schedule, Reinforcement, Psychology, Touch
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
The M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtype has been implicated in the underlying mechanisms of learning and memory and represents an important potential pharmacotherapeutic target for the cognitive impairments observed in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia show impairments in top-down processing involving conflict between sensory-driven and goal-oriented processes that can be modeled in preclinical studies using touchscreen-based cognition tasks. The present studies used a touchscreen visual pairwise discrimination task in which mice discriminated between a less salient and a more salient stimulus to assess the influence of the M1 mAChR on top-down processing. M1 mAChR knockout (M1 KO) mice showed a slower rate of learning, evidenced by slower increases in accuracy over 12 consecutive days, and required more days to acquire (achieve 80% accuracy) this discrimination task compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the M1 positive allosteric modulator BQCA enhanced the rate of learning this discrimination in wild-type, but not in M1 KO, mice when BQCA was administered daily prior to testing over 12 consecutive days. Importantly, in discriminations between stimuli of equal salience, M1 KO mice did not show impaired acquisition and BQCA did not affect the rate of learning or acquisition in wild-type mice. These studies are the first to demonstrate performance deficits in M1 KO mice using touchscreen cognitive assessments and enhanced rate of learning and acquisition in wild-type mice through M1 mAChR potentiation when the touchscreen discrimination task involves top-down processing. Taken together, these findings provide further support for M1 potentiation as a potential treatment for the cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia.
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20 MeSH Terms
Four-month fluoroquinolone-containing regimens are inferior to standard 6-month tuberculosis treatment.
Sterling TR
(2015) Evid Based Med 20: 128-9
MeSH Terms: Antitubercular Agents, Female, Fluoroquinolones, Humans, Male, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
Added February 17, 2016
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Fluoroquinolone-resistant and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli from the milk of cows with clinical mastitis in Southern Taiwan.
Su Y, Yu CY, Tsai Y, Wang SH, Lee C, Chu C
(2016) J Microbiol Immunol Infect 49: 892-901
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Bacterial Proteins, Cattle, Cloxacillin, Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Infections, Escherichia coli Proteins, Female, Fluoroquinolones, Mastitis, Bovine, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Milk, Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction, Taiwan, beta-Lactam Resistance, beta-Lactamases
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE - Escherichia coli is a common pathogen to cause clinical and subclinical mastitis in cows. A total of 57 E. coli isolates from raw milk from cows were characterized genetically and biochemically.
METHODS - Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) genes, the mechanism for fluoroquinolone resistance, and variations in virulence genes and genomes of these E. coli isolates were investigated by the antimicrobial susceptibility test, simplex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE).
RESULTS - All E. coli isolates were resistant to cloxacillin (100%) and to a lesser extent (50%) to tetracycline, neomycin, gentamycin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime (CTX), and ceftazidime (CAZ). Nearly 70% of the isolates were resistant to at least two antimicrobials and 28.1% carried AmpA and AmpC genes simultaneously. The predominant bla gene was bla, followed by bla, bla, bla, and bla Among the six (10.5%) ESBL-producing E. coli carrying bla, bla, or bla, two isolates 31 of ST410 in the ST23 complex and 58 of ST167 in the ST10 complex were also resistant to ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, and levofloxacin, with mutations at codon 83 from serine to leucine and codon 87 from aspartic acid to asparagine in GyrA and at codon 80 from serine to isoleucine in ParC. These isolates were genetically diverse in pulsotype analysis, lacked toxin genes of human pathogenic E. coli and carried mostly the prevalent virulence genes fimH, papGII, and α-hemolysin.
CONCLUSION - Lacking virulence genes examined, genetic diverse E. coli isolates are unrelated to human pathogenic E. coli. Enhancing sanitation in milk processing and transportation is needed to eliminate multidrug-resistant (MDR), fluoroquinolone-resistant, and ESBL-producing E. coli isolates.
Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.
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18 MeSH Terms
Discovery and SAR of muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1) allosteric activators from a molecular libraries high throughput screen. Part 1: 2,5-dibenzyl-2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-ones as positive allosteric modulators.
Han C, Chatterjee A, Noetzel MJ, Panarese JD, Smith E, Chase P, Hodder P, Niswender C, Conn PJ, Lindsley CW, Stauffer SR
(2015) Bioorg Med Chem Lett 25: 384-8
MeSH Terms: Allosteric Regulation, Allosteric Site, Drug Discovery, Humans, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Molecular Structure, Pyrazoles, Quinolines, Quinolones, Receptor, Muscarinic M1, Small Molecule Libraries, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Results from a 2012 high-throughput screen of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR) against the human muscarinic receptor subtype 1 (M1) for positive allosteric modulators is reported. A content-rich screen utilizing an intracellular calcium mobilization triple-addition protocol allowed for assessment of all three modes of pharmacology at M1, including agonist, positive allosteric modulator, and antagonist activities in a single screening platform. We disclose a dibenzyl-2H-pyrazolo[4,3-c]quinolin-3(5H)-one hit (DBPQ, CID 915409) and examine N-benzyl pharmacophore/SAR relationships versus previously reported quinolin-3(5H)-ones and isatins, including ML137. SAR and consideration of recently reported crystal structures, homology modeling, and structure-function relationships using point mutations suggests a shared binding mode orientation at the putative common allosteric binding site directed by the pendant N-benzyl substructure.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
A comparison of interview methods to ascertain fluoroquinolone exposure before tuberculosis diagnosis.
Van Der Heijden YF, Maruri F, Holt E, Mitchel E, Warkentin J, Sterling TR
(2015) Epidemiol Infect 143: 960-5
MeSH Terms: Adult, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Databases, Factual, Delayed Diagnosis, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Female, Fluoroquinolones, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Medical History Taking, Medical Records, Middle Aged, Pharmacies, Surveys and Questionnaires, Tennessee, Tuberculosis, Tuberculosis, Pulmonary
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
SUMMARY Fluoroquinolone use before tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis delays the time to diagnosis and treatment, and increases the risk of fluoroquinolone-resistant TB and death. Ascertainment of fluoroquinolone exposure could identify such high-risk patients. We compared four methods of ascertaining fluoroquinolone exposure in the 6 months prior to TB diagnosis in culture-confirmed TB patients in Tennessee from January 2007 to December 2009. The four methods included a simple questionnaire administered to all TB suspects by health department personnel (FQ-Form), an in-home interview conducted by research staff, outpatient and inpatient medical record review, and TennCare pharmacy database review. Of 177 TB patients included, 72 (41%) received fluoroquinolones during the 6 months before TB diagnosis. Fluoroquinolone exposure determined by review of inpatient and outpatient medical records was considered the gold standard for comparison. The FQ-Form had 61% [95% confidence interval (CI) 48-73] sensitivity and 93% (95% CI 85-98) specificity (agreement 79%, kappa = 0.56) while the in-home interview had 28% (95% CI 18-40) sensitivity and 99% (94-100%) specificity (agreement 68%, kappa = 0.29). A simple questionnaire administered by health department personnel identified fluoroquinolone exposure before TB diagnosis with moderate reliability.
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18 MeSH Terms