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Pyridoxamine reduces postinjury fibrosis and improves functional recovery after acute kidney injury.
Skrypnyk NI, Voziyan P, Yang H, de Caestecker CR, Theberge MC, Drouin M, Hudson B, Harris RC, de Caestecker MP
(2016) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 311: F268-77
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Animals, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fibrosis, Isoprostanes, Kidney Tubules, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Oxidative Stress, Pyridoxamine, Recovery of Function, Vitamin B Complex
Show Abstract · Added August 11, 2016
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and independent risk factor for death and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Despite promising preclinical data, there is no evidence that antioxidants reduce the severity of injury, increase recovery, or prevent CKD in patients with AKI. Pyridoxamine (PM) is a structural analog of vitamin B6 that interferes with oxidative macromolecular damage via a number of different mechanisms and is in a phase 3 clinical efficacy trial to delay CKD progression in patients with diabetic kidney disease. Because oxidative stress is implicated as one of the main drivers of renal injury after AKI, the ability of PM to interfere with multiple aspects of oxidative damage may be favorable for AKI treatment. In these studies we therefore evaluated PM treatment in a mouse model of AKI. Pretreatment with PM caused a dose-dependent reduction in acute tubular injury, long-term postinjury fibrosis, as well as improved functional recovery after ischemia-reperfusion AKI (IR-AKI). This was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in the oxidative stress marker isofuran-to-F2-isoprostane ratio, indicating that PM reduces renal oxidative damage post-AKI. PM also reduced postinjury fibrosis when administered 24 h after the initiating injury, but this was not associated with improvement in functional recovery after IR-AKI. This is the first report showing that treatment with PM reduces short- and long-term injury, fibrosis, and renal functional recovery after IR-AKI. These preclinical findings suggest that PM, which has a favorable clinical safety profile, holds therapeutic promise for AKI and, most importantly, for prevention of adverse long-term outcomes after AKI.
Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.
1 Communities
4 Members
1 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Pyridoxamine protects proteins from damage by hypohalous acids in vitro and in vivo.
Madu H, Avance J, Chetyrkin S, Darris C, Rose KL, Sanchez OA, Hudson B, Voziyan P
(2015) Free Radic Biol Med 89: 83-90
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Bromates, Chromatography, Liquid, Collagen Type IV, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental, Humans, Hypochlorous Acid, In Vitro Techniques, Kidney, Male, Molecular Sequence Data, Oxidants, Oxidation-Reduction, Proteolysis, Pyridoxamine, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Vitamin B Complex
Show Abstract · Added November 5, 2015
Diabetes is characterized, in part, by activation of toxic oxidative and glycoxidative pathways that are triggered by persistent hyperglycemia and contribute to diabetic complications. Inhibition of these pathways may benefit diabetic patients by delaying the onset of complications. One such inhibitor, pyridoxamine (PM), had shown promise in clinical trials. However, the mechanism of PM action in vivo is not well understood. We have previously reported that hypohalous acids can cause disruption of the structure and function of renal collagen IV in experimental diabetes (K.L. Brown et al., Diabetes 64:2242-2253, 2015). In the present study, we demonstrate that PM can protect protein functionality from hypochlorous and hypobromous acid-derived damage via a rapid direct reaction with and detoxification of these hypohalous acids. We further demonstrate that PM treatment can ameliorate specific hypohalous acid-derived structural and functional damage to the renal collagen IV network in a diabetic animal model. These findings suggest a new mechanism of PM action in diabetes, namely sequestration of hypohalous acids, which may contribute to known therapeutic effects of PM in human diabetic nephropathy.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
2 Members
1 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
5'-O-Alkylpyridoxamines: Lipophilic Analogues of Pyridoxamine Are Potent Scavengers of 1,2-Dicarbonyls.
Amarnath V, Amarnath K, Avance J, Stec DF, Voziyan P
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 1469-75
MeSH Terms: Biocatalysis, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Free Radical Scavengers, Free Radicals, Glucose, Horseradish Peroxidase, Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions, Membrane Proteins, Molecular Conformation, Muramidase, Pyridoxamine, Pyruvaldehyde, Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet, Superoxide Dismutase
Show Abstract · Added June 9, 2017
Pyridoxamine (PM) is a prospective drug for the treatment of diabetic complications. In order to make zwitterionic PM more lipophilic and improve its tissue distribution, PM derivatives containing medium length alkyl groups on the hydroxymethyl side chain were prepared. The synthesis of these alkylpyridoxamines (alkyl-PMs) starting from pyridoxine offers high yields and is amenable to bulk preparations. Interestingly, alkyl-PMs were found to react with methylglyoxal (MGO), a major toxic product of glucose metabolism and autoxidation, several orders of magnitude faster than PM. This suggests the formation of nonionic pyrido-1,3-oxazine as the key step in the reaction of PM with MGO. Since the primary target of MGO in proteins is the guanidine side chain of arginine, alkyl-PMs were shown to be more effective than PM in reducing the modification of N-α-benzoylarginine by MGO. Alkyl-PMs in the presence of MGO also protected the enzymatic activity of lysozyme that contains several arginine residues next to its active site. Alkyl-PMs can be expected to trap MGO and other toxic 1,2-carbonyl compounds more effectively than PM, especially in lipophilic tissue environments, thus protecting macromolecules from functional damage. This suggests potential therapeutic uses for alkyl-PMs in diabetes and other diseases characterized by the elevated levels of toxic dicarbonyl compounds.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Pyridoxamine dihydrochloride in diabetic nephropathy (PIONEER-CSG-17): lessons learned from a pilot study.
Dwyer JP, Greco BA, Umanath K, Packham D, Fox JW, Peterson R, Broome BR, Greene LE, Sika M, Lewis JB
(2015) Nephron 129: 22-8
MeSH Terms: Aged, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Antihypertensive Agents, Antioxidants, Creatinine, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Diuretics, Double-Blind Method, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Humans, Male, Pilot Projects, Pyridoxamine
Show Abstract · Added January 30, 2015
BACKGROUND/AIMS - Pyridoxamine dihydrochloride (Pyridorin™) blocks pathogenic oxidative pathways in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The pyridoxamine pilot study was designed to test entry criteria and outcomes. Subjects had SCr 1.3-3.5 mg/dl, protein-to-creatinine ≥1,200 mg/g and used a surrogate outcome of ΔSCr over 52 weeks. Subjects had to be on a maximally tolerated dose of ACE/ARB for 3 months; stable other antihypertensive doses for 2 months; stable diuretic dose for 2 weeks, and BP ≤160/90 mm Hg; or enter a Pharmaco-Stabilization Phase (PSP). This pilot failed to detect an effect on ΔSCr in intent-to-treat analysis.
METHODS - We queried the locked clinical trial database for subgroups in which there was a treatment effect.
RESULTS - Subjects not requiring PSP and those with entry SCr <2.0 mg/dl had a treatment effect. Subjects entering PSP required more changes in antihypertensive medications and experienced larger ΔSCr over 52 weeks. PSP subjects with BP >140/90 mm Hg had no treatment effect, but those ≤140/90 mm Hg did.
CONCLUSION - Time required for acute effects of ACE/ARB to stabilize is unknown, but these data suggest >3 months. Thus, subjects in the pivotal trial must be on ACE/ARB for 6 months. Frequent antihypertensive adjustment could engender SCr changes unrelated to CKD progression. Thus, we will require subjects to have BP ≤150/90 mm Hg and on stable antihypertensives for 26 weeks, or ≤140/90 mm Hg and on stable antihypertensives for 13 weeks. Since ΔSCr over 52 weeks is limited as a surrogate outcome, the pivotal trial uses a time-to-event analysis of baseline SCr to at least a 50% increase in SCr or ESRD as the primary outcome. This substantial ΔSCr is protected from noise and is clinically relevant. The pyridoxamine pilot provided critical information to inform the design of PIONEER-CSG-17, which we conducted under the SPA agreement with FDA.
0 Communities
1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Pyridorin in type 2 diabetic nephropathy.
Lewis EJ, Greene T, Spitalewiz S, Blumenthal S, Berl T, Hunsicker LG, Pohl MA, Rohde RD, Raz I, Yerushalmy Y, Yagil Y, Herskovits T, Atkins RC, Reutens AT, Packham DK, Lewis JB, Collaborative Study Group
(2012) J Am Soc Nephrol 23: 131-6
MeSH Terms: Aged, Creatinine, Cystatin C, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Double-Blind Method, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Proteinuria, Pyridoxal Phosphate, Pyridoxamine
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Pyridoxamine dihydrochloride (Pyridorin, NephroGenex) inhibits formation of advanced glycation end products and scavenges reactive oxygen species and toxic carbonyls, but whether these actions translate into renoprotective effects is unknown. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 317 patients with proteinuric type 2 diabetic nephropathy to twice-daily placebo; Pyridorin, 150 mg twice daily; or Pyridorin, 300 mg twice daily, for 52 weeks. At baseline, the mean age ± SD was 63.9±9.5 years, and the mean duration of diabetes was 17.6±8.5 years; the mean serum creatinine level was 2.2±0.6 mg/dl, and the mean protein-to-creatinine ratio was 2973±1932 mg/g. Regarding the primary end point, a statistically significant change in serum creatinine from baseline to 52 weeks was not evident in either Pyridorin group compared with placebo. However, analysis of covariance suggested that the magnitude of the treatment effect differed by baseline renal function. Among patients in the lowest tertile of baseline serum creatinine concentration, treatment with Pyridorin associated with a lower average change in serum creatinine concentration at 52 weeks (0.28, 0.07, and 0.14 mg/dl for placebo, Pyridorin 150 mg, and Pyridorin 300 mg, respectively; P=0.05 for either Pyridorin dose versus placebo); there was no evidence of a significant treatment effect in the middle or upper tertiles. In conclusion, this trial failed to detect an effect of Pyridorin on the progression of serum creatinine at 1 year, although it suggests that patients with less renal impairment might benefit.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Pyridoxamine protects protein backbone from oxidative fragmentation.
Chetyrkin S, Mathis M, Hayes McDonald W, Shackelford X, Hudson B, Voziyan P
(2011) Biochem Biophys Res Commun 411: 574-9
MeSH Terms: Antioxidants, Glucose, Hydroxyl Radical, Muramidase, Oxidation-Reduction, Proteins, Pyridoxamine, Ribonucleases, Serum Albumin, Bovine
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2014
Oxidative damage to proteins is one of the major pathogenic mechanisms in many chronic diseases. Therefore, inhibition of this oxidative damage can be an important part of therapeutic strategies. Pyridoxamine (PM), a prospective drug for treatment of diabetic nephropathy, has been previously shown to inhibit several oxidative and glycoxidative pathways, thus protecting amino acid side chains of the proteins from oxidative damage. Here, we demonstrated that PM can also protect protein backbone from fragmentation induced via different oxidative mechanisms including autoxidation of glucose. This protection was due to hydroxyl radical scavenging by PM and may contribute to PM therapeutic effects shown in clinical trials.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Characterization of scavengers of gamma-ketoaldehydes that do not inhibit prostaglandin biosynthesis.
Zagol-Ikapitte I, Amarnath V, Bala M, Roberts LJ, Oates JA, Boutaud O
(2010) Chem Res Toxicol 23: 240-50
MeSH Terms: Amines, Blood Platelets, Cell Line, Tumor, Cyclooxygenase 2, Hep G2 Cells, Humans, Prostaglandins, Prostaglandins H, Pyridoxamine
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with the development of many pathologic conditions. The product of COX-2, prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)), can spontaneously rearrange to form reactive gamma-ketoaldehydes called levuglandins (LGs). This gamma-ketoaldehyde structure confers a high degree of reactivity on the LGs, which rapidly form covalent adducts with primary amines of protein residues. Formation of LG adducts of proteins has been demonstrated in pathologic conditions (e.g., increased levels in the hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease) and during physiologic function (platelet activation). On the basis of knowledge that lipid modification of proteins is known to cause their translocation and to alter their function, we hypothesize that modification of proteins by LG could have functional consequences. Testing this hypothesis requires an experimental approach that discriminates between the effects of protein modification by LG and the effects of cyclooxygenase-derived prostanoids acting through their G-protein coupled receptors. To achieve this goal, we have synthesized and evaluated a series of scavengers that react with LG with a potency more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than that with the epsilon-amine of lysine. A subset of these scavengers are shown to block the formation of LG adducts of proteins in cells without inhibiting the catalytic activity of the cyclooxygenases. Ten of these selective scavengers did not produce cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that small molecules can scavenge LGs in cells without interfering with the formation of prostaglandins. They also provide a working hypothesis for the development of pharmacologic agents that could be used in experimental animals in vivo to assess the pathophysiological contribution of levuglandins in diseases associated with cyclooxygenase up-regulation.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Pyridoxamine protects intestinal epithelium from ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis.
Thotala D, Chetyrkin S, Hudson B, Hallahan D, Voziyan P, Yazlovitskaya E
(2009) Free Radic Biol Med 47: 779-85
MeSH Terms: Amifostine, Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Cytoprotection, Free Radical Scavengers, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Pyridoxamine, Radiation Injuries, Experimental, Radiation, Ionizing, Radiation-Protective Agents
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2014
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are the major causes of biological tissue damage during exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). The existing strategies to protect normal tissues from the detrimental effects of IR suffer from several shortcomings including highly toxic side effects, unfavorable administration routes, and low efficacy. These shortcomings emphasize a need for radioprotective treatments that combine effectiveness with safety and ease of use. In this paper, we demonstrate that pyridoxamine, a ROS and RCS scavenger with a very favorable safety profile, can inhibit IR-induced gastrointestinal epithelial apoptosis in cell culture and in an animal model. Pyridoxamine was more effective at protecting from radiation-induced apoptosis than amifostine, a synthetic thiol compound and the only FDA-approved radioprotector. We suggest that pyridoxamine has potential as an effective and safe radioprotective agent.
1 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Low concentrations of reactive gamma-ketoaldehydes prime thromboxane-dependent human platelet aggregation via p38-MAPK activation.
Bernoud-Hubac N, Alam DA, Lefils J, Davies SS, Amarnath V, Guichardant M, Roberts LJ, Lagarde M
(2009) Biochim Biophys Acta 1791: 307-13
MeSH Terms: Blood Platelets, Blotting, Western, Collagen, Cytosol, Humans, Isoprostanes, MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases, Phospholipases A2, Phosphorylation, Platelet Activation, Platelet Aggregation, Prostaglandins E, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Pyridoxamine, Thromboxane B2, Vitamin B Complex
Show Abstract · Added June 1, 2013
Oxidative stress has been strongly implicated in pathological processes. Isoketals are highly reactive gamma-ketoaldehydes of the isoprostanes pathway of free radical-induced peroxidation of arachidonic acid that are analogous to cyclooxygenase-derived levuglandins. Because aldehydes, that are much less reactive than isoketals, have been shown to trigger platelet activation, we investigated the effect of one isoketal (E(2)-IsoK) on platelet aggregation. Isoketal potentiated aggregation and the formation of thromboxane B(2) in platelets challenged with collagen at a concentration as low as 1 nM. Moreover, the potentiating effect of 1 nM isoketal on collagen-induced platelet aggregation was prevented by pyridoxamine, an effective scavenger of gamma-ketoaldehydes. Furthermore, we provide evidence for the involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in isoketal-mediated platelet priming, suggesting that isoketals may act upstream the activation of collagen-induced cytosolic phospholipase A(2). Additionally, the incubation of platelets with 1 nM isoketal led to the phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2). The cytosolic phopholipase A(2) inhibitors AACOCF3 and MAFP both fully prevented the increase in isoketal-mediated platelet aggregation challenged with collagen. These results indicate that isoketals could play an important role in platelet hyperfunction observed in pathological states such as atherosclerosis and thrombosis through the activation of the endogenous arachidonic acid cascade.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Modulation of protein function by isoketals and levuglandins.
Davies SS
(2008) Subcell Biochem 49: 49-70
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Amines, Animals, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cytotoxins, Dinoprostone, Humans, Ion Channels, Lipid Peroxidation, Lysine, Microtubules, Prostaglandins, Proteasome Inhibitors, Proteins, Pyridoxamine
Show Abstract · Added June 1, 2013
Oxidative stress, defined as an increase in reactive oxygen species, leads to peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and generates a vast number of biologically active molecules, many of which might contribute in some way to health and disease. This chapter will focus on one specific class of peroxidation products, the levuglandins and isoketals (also called isolevuglandins). These gamma-ketoaldehydes are some of the most reactive products derived from the peroxidation of lipids and exert their biological effects by rapidly adducting to primary amines such as the lysyl residues of proteins. The mechanism of their formation and remarkable reactivity will be described, along with evidence for their increased formation in disease conditions linked with oxidative stress and inflammation. Finally, the currently known effects of these gamma-ketoaldehydes on cellular function will then be discussed and when appropriate compared to the effects of alpha,beta-unsaturated fatty aldehydes, in order to illustrate the significant differences between these two classes of peroxidation products that modify proteins.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms