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Identifying host genetic risk factors in the context of public health surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease.
Lingappa JR, Dumitrescu L, Zimmer SM, Lynfield R, McNicholl JM, Messonnier NE, Whitney CG, Crawford DC
(2011) PLoS One 6: e23413
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, DNA, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Membrane Cofactor Protein, Pilot Projects, Pneumococcal Infections, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Population Surveillance, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Receptors, Interleukin-1 Type I, Risk Factors, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Host genetic factors that modify risk of pneumococcal disease may help target future public health interventions to individuals at highest risk of disease. We linked data from population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with state-based newborn dried bloodspot repositories to identify biological samples from individuals who developed invasive pneumococcal disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from 366 case and 732 anonymous control samples. TagSNPs were selected in 34 candidate genes thought to be associated with host response to invasive pneumococcal disease, and a total of 326 variants were successfully genotyped. Among 543 European Americans (EA) (182 cases and 361 controls), and 166 African Americans (AA) (53 cases and 113 controls), common variants in surfactant protein D (SFTPD) are consistently underrepresented in IPD. SFTPD variants with the strongest association for IPD are intronic rs17886286 (allelic OR 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.25, 0.82], with p = 0.007) in EA and 5' flanking rs12219080 (allelic OR 0.32, 95%CI [0.13, 0.78], with p = 0.009) in AA. Variants in CD46 and IL1R1 are also associated with IPD in both EA and AA, but with effects in different directions; FAS, IL1B, IL4, IL10, IL12B, SFTPA1, SFTPB, and PTAFR variants are associated (p≤0.05) with IPD in EA or AA. We conclude that variants in SFTPD may protect against IPD in EA and AA and genetic variation in other host response pathways may also contribute to risk of IPD. While our associations are not corrected for multiple comparisons and therefore must be replicated in additional cohorts, this pilot study underscores the feasibility of integrating public health surveillance with existing, prospectively collected, newborn dried blood spot repositories to identify host genetic factors associated with infectious diseases.
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23 MeSH Terms
Early alveolar epithelial dysfunction promotes lung inflammation in a mouse model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.
Atochina-Vasserman EN, Bates SR, Zhang P, Abramova H, Zhang Z, Gonzales L, Tao JQ, Gochuico BR, Gahl W, Guo CJ, Gow AJ, Beers MF, Guttentag S
(2011) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 184: 449-58
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Cell Movement, Chemokine CCL2, Chemotactic Factors, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Fibrosis, Hermanski-Pudlak Syndrome, Humans, Lung, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Mutant Strains, Nitroso Compounds, Phospholipids, Pneumonia, Pulmonary Alveoli, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Respiratory Mucosa, Severity of Illness Index, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
RATIONALE - The pulmonary phenotype of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) in adults includes foamy alveolar type 2 cells, inflammation, and lung remodeling, but there is no information about ontogeny or early disease mediators.
OBJECTIVES - To establish the ontogeny of HPS lung disease in an animal model, examine disease mediators, and relate them to patients with HPS1.
METHODS - Mice with mutations in both HPS1/pale ear and HPS2/AP3B1/pearl (EPPE mice) were studied longitudinally. Total lung homogenate, lung tissue sections, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were examined for phospholipid, collagen, histology, cell counts, chemokines, surfactant protein D (SP-D), and S-nitrosylated SP-D. Isolated alveolar epithelial cells were examined for expression of inflammatory mediators, and chemotaxis assays were used to assess their importance. Pulmonary function test results and BAL from patients with HPS1 and normal volunteers were examined for clinical correlation.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - EPPE mice develop increased total lung phospholipid, followed by a macrophage-predominant pulmonary inflammation, and lung remodeling including fibrosis. BAL fluid from EPPE animals exhibited early accumulation of both SP-D and S-nitrosylated SP-D. BAL fluid from patients with HPS1 exhibited similar changes in SP-D that correlated inversely with pulmonary function. Alveolar epithelial cells demonstrated expression of both monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in juvenile EPPE mice. Last, BAL from EPPE mice and patients with HPS1 enhanced migration of RAW267.4 cells, which was attenuated by immunodepletion of SP-D and MCP-1.
CONCLUSIONS - Inflammation is initiated from the abnormal alveolar epithelial cells in HPS, and S-nitrosylated SP-D plays a significant role in amplifying pulmonary inflammation.
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23 MeSH Terms
Prognostic and pathogenetic value of combining clinical and biochemical indices in patients with acute lung injury.
Ware LB, Koyama T, Billheimer DD, Wu W, Bernard GR, Thompson BT, Brower RG, Standiford TJ, Martin TR, Matthay MA, NHLBI ARDS Clinical Trials Network
(2010) Chest 137: 288-96
MeSH Terms: Acute Lung Injury, Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Blood Coagulation Factors, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Interleukin-8, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Prognosis, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Survival Rate, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - No single clinical or biologic marker reliably predicts clinical outcomes in acute lung injury (ALI)/ARDS. We hypothesized that a combination of biologic and clinical markers would be superior to either biomarkers or clinical factors alone in predicting ALI/ARDS mortality and would provide insight into the pathogenesis of clinical ALI/ARDS.
METHODS - Eight biologic markers that reflect endothelial and epithelial injury, inflammation, and coagulation (von Willebrand factor antigen, surfactant protein D [SP-D]), tumor necrosis factor receptor-1, interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, protein C, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) were measured in baseline plasma from 549 patients in the ARDSNet trial of low vs high positive end-expiratory pressure. Mortality was modeled with multivariable logistic regression. Predictors were selected using backward elimination. Comparisons between candidate models were based on the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) and tests of integrated discrimination improvement.
RESULTS - Clinical predictors (Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation III [APACHE III], organ failures, age, underlying cause, alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient, plateau pressure) predicted mortality with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.82; a combination of eight biomarkers and the clinical predictors had an AUC of 0.85. The best performing biomarkers were the neutrophil chemotactic factor, IL-8, and SP-D, a product of alveolar type 2 cells, supporting the concept that acute inflammation and alveolar epithelial injury are important pathogenetic pathways in human ALI/ARDS.
CONCLUSIONS - A combination of biomarkers and clinical predictors is superior to clinical predictors or biomarkers alone for predicting mortality in ALI/ARDS and may be useful for stratifying patients in clinical trials. From a pathogenesis perspective, the degree of acute inflammation and alveolar epithelial injury are highly associated with the outcome of human ALI/ARDS.
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16 MeSH Terms
Surfactant-associated protein A provides critical immunoprotection in neonatal mice.
George CL, Goss KL, Meyerholz DK, Lamb FS, Snyder JM
(2008) Infect Immun 76: 380-90
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Bedding and Linens, Dust, Female, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression, Humans, Immunity, Maternally-Acquired, Litter Size, Male, Mice, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Zea mays
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
The collectins surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and SP-D are components of innate immunity that are present before birth. Both proteins bind pathogens and assist in clearing infection. The significance of SP-A and SP-D as components of the neonatal immune system has not been investigated. To determine the role of SP-A and SP-D in neonatal immunity, wild-type, SP-A null, and SP-D null mice were bred in a bacterium-laden environment (corn dust bedding) or in a semisterile environment (cellulose fiber bedding). When reared in the corn dust bedding, SP-A null pups had significant mortality (P < 0.001) compared to both wild-type and SP-D null pups exposed to the same environment. The mortality of the SP-A null pups was associated with significant gastrointestinal tract pathology but little lung pathology. Moribund SP-A null newborn mice exhibited Bacillus sp. and Enterococcus sp. peritonitis. When the mother or newborn produced SP-A, newborn survival was significantly improved (P < 0.05) compared to the results when there was a complete absence of SP-A in both the mother and the pup. Significant sources of SP-A likely to protect a newborn include the neonatal lung and gastrointestinal tract but not the lactating mammary tissue of the mother. Furthermore, exogenous SP-A delivered by mouth to newborn SP-A null pups with SP-A null mothers improved newborn survival in the corn dust environment. Therefore, a lack of SP-D did not affect newborn survival, while SP-A produced by either the mother or the pup or oral exogenous SP-A significantly reduced newborn mortality associated with environmentally induced infection in SP-A null newborns.
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15 MeSH Terms
N-linked glycosylation attenuates H3N2 influenza viruses.
Vigerust DJ, Ulett KB, Boyd KL, Madsen J, Hawgood S, McCullers JA
(2007) J Virol 81: 8593-600
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, Glycosylation, Hemagglutination, Viral, Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus, Humans, Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype, Influenza, Human, Lung, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Oligosaccharides, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Over the last four decades, H3N2 subtype influenza A viruses have gradually acquired additional potential sites for glycosylation within the globular head of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. Here, we have examined the biological effect of additional glycosylation on the virulence of H3N2 influenza viruses. We created otherwise isogenic reassortant viruses by site-directed mutagenesis that contain additional potential sites for glycosylation and examined the effect on virulence in naïve BALB/c, C57BL/6, and surfactant protein D (SP-D)-deficient mice. The introduction of additional sites was consistent with the sequence of acquisition in the globular head over the past 40 years, beginning with two sites in 1968 to the seven sites found in contemporary influenza viruses circulating in 2000. Decreased morbidity and mortality, as well as lower viral lung titers, were seen in mice as the level of potential glycosylation of the viruses increased. This correlated with decreased evidence of virus-mediated lung damage and increased in vitro inhibition of hemagglutination by SP-D. SP-D-deficient animals displayed an inverse pattern of disease, such that more highly glycosylated viruses elicited disease equivalent to or exceeding that of the wild type. We conclude from these data that increased glycosylation of influenza viruses results in decreased virulence, which is at least partly mediated by SP-D-induced clearance from the lung. The continued exploration of interactions between highly glycosylated viruses and surfactant proteins may lead to an improved understanding of the biology within the lung and strategies for viral control.
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16 MeSH Terms
Defective surfactant secretion in a mouse model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.
Guttentag SH, Akhtar A, Tao JQ, Atochina E, Rusiniak ME, Swank RT, Bates SR
(2005) Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 33: 14-21
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blotting, Western, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, Capillaries, Densitometry, Disease Models, Animal, Hermanski-Pudlak Syndrome, Humans, Immunoblotting, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Phospholipids, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein B, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein C, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, RNA, Messenger, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Surface-Active Agents, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) in humans represents a family of disorders of lysosome-related organelle biogenesis associated with severe, progressive pulmonary disease. Human case reports and a mouse model of HPS, the pale ear/pearl mouse (ep/pe), exhibit giant lamellar bodies (GLB) in type II alveolar epithelial cells. We examined surfactant proteins and phospholipid from ep/pe mice to elucidate the process of GLB formation. The 2.8-fold enrichment of tissue phospholipids in ep/pe mice resulted from accumulation from birth through adulthood. Tissue surfactant protein (SP)-B and -C were increased in adult ep/pe mice compared with wild-type mice (WT), whereas SP-A and -D were not different. Large aggregate surfactant (LA) from adult ep/pe mice had decreased phospholipid, SP-B, and SP-C, with no differences in SP-A and -D compared with WT. Although LA from ep/pe animals exhibited an increased total protein-to-total phospholipid ratio compared with WT, surface tension was not compromised. Phospholipid secretion from isolated type II cells showed that basal and stimulated secretion from ep/pe cells were approximately 50% of WT cells. Together, our data indicate that GLB formation is not associated with abnormal trafficking or recycling of surfactant material. Instead, impaired secretion is an important component of GLB formation in ep/pe mice.
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23 MeSH Terms
Serum levels of surfactant protein D are increased in mice with lung tumors.
Zhang F, Pao W, Umphress S, Jakowlew S, Meyer AM, Dwyer-Nield LD, Takeda K, Gelfand EW, Fisher J, Malkinson AM, Mason RJ
(2004) Chest 125: 109S
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Tumor, Carcinogens, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Reference Values, Sensitivity and Specificity, Urethane
Added March 24, 2014
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11 MeSH Terms
Serum levels of surfactant protein D are increased in mice with lung tumors.
Zhang F, Pao W, Umphress SM, Jakowlew SB, Meyer AM, Dwyer-Nield LD, Nielsen LD, Takeda K, Gelfand EW, Fisher JH, Zhang L, Malkinson AM, Mason RJ
(2003) Cancer Res 63: 5889-94
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Carcinogens, Gene Deletion, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genes, ras, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred A, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Transgenic, Ovalbumin, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Rats, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Urethane
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2014
Most murine lung tumors are composed of differentiated epithelial cells. We have reported previously that surfactant protein (SP)-D is expressed in urethane-induced tumors. Serum levels of SP-D are increased in patients with interstitial lung disease and acute respiratory distress syndrome and in rats with acute lung injury but have not been measured in mice. In this study, we sought to determine whether SP-D could be detected in murine serum and discovered that it was increased in mice bearing lung tumors. Serum SP-D concentration was 5.0 +/- 0.2 ng/ml in normal C57BL/6 mice, essentially absent in SP-D nulls, and 63.6 +/- 9.0 ng/ml in SP-D-overexpressing mice. SP-D in serum was verified by immunoblotting. Serum SP-D was increased in mice bearing tumors induced by three different protocols, and the SP-D level correlated with tumor volume. However, in mice with a single adenoma or a few adenomas, SP-D levels were usually within the normal range. SP-D was expressed by the tumor cells, and there was also a field effect whereby type II cells near the tumor expressed more SP-D than type II cells in the remainder of the lung. Serum SP-D was also increased by lung inflammation. In airway inflammation induced by aerosolized ovalbumin in sensitized BALB/c mice, the serum levels were elevated after challenge. In conclusion, serum SP-D concentration is increased in mice bearing lung tumors and generally reflects the tumor burden but is also elevated during lung inflammation.
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18 MeSH Terms
Alterations in lung collectins in an adaptive allergic immune response.
Haley KJ, Ciota A, Contreras JP, Boothby MR, Perkins DL, Finn PW
(2002) Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 282: L573-84
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Antibody Formation, Apoproteins, B-Lymphocytes, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid, Carrier Proteins, Collectins, Genes, RAG-1, Glycoproteins, Hypersensitivity, Immunization, Lung, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Mice, Knockout, Ovalbumin, Proteolipids, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Proteins, Pulmonary Surfactants, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Although surfactant apoproteins are known to be mediators of innate responses, their relationship to adaptive responses has not been examined extensively. We investigated possible links between surfactant apoproteins and responses to allergens by studying alterations in surfactant apoproteins A, B, and D in a murine model of allergic pulmonary inflammation. Three murine strains (BALB/c, C57BL/6, and 129J) demonstrated increased immunostaining of surfactant apoproteins A and D in nonciliated epithelial cells of noncartilaginous airways after aerosolized challenge. In contrast, surfactant apoprotein B immunostaining was unchanged. Immunoblotting demonstrated increased surfactant A in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after allergen sensitization and challenge. Surfactant apoprotein A and D induction required T and/or B lymphocyte responses to allergen, since the induction was absent in recombinase-activating gene-deficient mice, which lack functional lymphocytes. We conclude that increased immunoreactivity of two collectins, surfactant apoproteins A and D, occurs within the response to allergen. Our findings support a model in which surfactant apoproteins A and D are important to both innate immunity and adaptive immune responses to allergens.
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22 MeSH Terms
Maintenance of differentiated function of the surfactant system in human fetal lung type II epithelial cells cultured on plastic.
Gonzales LW, Angampalli S, Guttentag SH, Beers MF, Feinstein SI, Matlapudi A, Ballard PL
(2001) Pediatr Pathol Mol Med 20: 387-412
MeSH Terms: 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine, 8-Bromo Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate, Animals, Cell Culture Techniques, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Collagenases, Coloring Agents, Culture Media, Serum-Free, Cyclic AMP, DNA, Complementary, Dexamethasone, Epithelial Cells, Glucocorticoids, Glycoproteins, Humans, Immunoblotting, Immunohistochemistry, Lung, Microscopy, Electron, Oxazines, Phosphatidylcholines, Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors, Phospholipids, Plastics, Precipitin Tests, Proteolipids, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein A, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Protein D, Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Proteins, Pulmonary Surfactants, RNA, Messenger, Surface-Active Agents, Time Factors, Transfection, Trypsin
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
We report a simplified culture system for human fetal lung type II cells that maintains surfactant expression. Type II cells isolated from explant cultures of hormone-treated lungs (18-22 wk gestation) by collagenase + trypsin digestion were cultured on plastic for 4 days in serum-free medium containing dexamethasone (Dex, 10 nM) + 8-bromo-cAMP (0.1 mM + isobutylmethylxanthine (0.1 mM) or were untreated (control). Surfactant protein (SP) mRNAs decreased markedly in control cells between days 1 and 4 of culture, but mRNA levels were high in treated cells on day) 4 (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D; 600%, 100%, 85%, 130% of day 0 content, respectively). Dex or cAMP alone increased SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D mRNAs and together had additive effects. The greatest increase in SP-A mRNA occurred with cAMP alone. Treated cells processed pro-SP-B and pro-SP-C proteins to mature forms and had a higher rate of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis (2-fold) and higher saturation of PC (approximately 34% versus 27%) than controls. Only treated cells maintained secretagogue-responsive phospholipid synthesis. By electron microscopy, the treated cells retained lamellar bodies and extensive microvilli. We conclude that Dex and cAMP additively stimulate expression of surfactant components in isolated fetal type II cells, providing a simplified culture system for investigation of surfactant-related, and perhaps other, type II cell functions.
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36 MeSH Terms