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Making Cancer Quiescent: SPDEF De-Cycles Beta-Catenin.
Fingleton B
(2017) Gastroenterology 153: 10-12
MeSH Terms: Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Neoplasms, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, beta Catenin
Added March 21, 2018
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1 Members
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5 MeSH Terms
Scavengers of reactive γ-ketoaldehydes extend Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan and healthspan through protein-level interactions with SIR-2.1 and ETS-7.
Nguyen TT, Caito SW, Zackert WE, West JD, Zhu S, Aschner M, Fessel JP, Roberts LJ
(2016) Aging (Albany NY) 8: 1759-80
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Lipid Peroxidation, Longevity, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Sirtuins
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2016
Isoketals (IsoKs) are highly reactive γ-ketoaldehyde products of lipid peroxidation that covalently adduct lysine side chains in proteins, impairing their function. Using C. elegans as a model organism, we sought to test the hypothesis that IsoKs contribute to molecular aging through adduction and inactivation of specific protein targets, and that this process can be abrogated using salicylamine (SA), a selective IsoK scavenger. Treatment with SA extends adult nematode longevity by nearly 56% and prevents multiple deleterious age-related biochemical and functional changes. Testing of a variety of molecular targets for SA's action revealed the sirtuin SIR-2.1 as the leading candidate. When SA was administered to a SIR-2.1 knockout strain, the effects on lifespan and healthspan extension were abolished. The SIR-2.1-dependent effects of SA were not mediated by large changes in gene expression programs or by significant changes in mitochondrial function. However, expression array analysis did show SA-dependent regulation of the transcription factor ets-7 and associated genes. In ets-7 knockout worms, SA's longevity effects were abolished, similar to sir-2.1 knockouts. However, SA dose-dependently increases ets-7 mRNA levels in non-functional SIR-2.1 mutant, suggesting that both are necessary for SA's complete lifespan and healthspan extension.
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9 MeSH Terms
Pet-1 deficiency alters the circadian clock and its temporal organization of behavior.
Ciarleglio CM, Resuehr HE, Axley JC, Deneris ES, McMahon DG
(2014) PLoS One 9: e97412
MeSH Terms: Animals, Behavior, Animal, Brain, Circadian Rhythm, Female, Genotype, Heterozygote, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Motor Activity, Phenotype, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Retina, Serotonergic Neurons, Serotonin, Signal Transduction, Suprachiasmatic Nucleus, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
The serotonin and circadian systems are two important interactive regulatory networks in the mammalian brain that regulate behavior and physiology in ways that are known to impact human mental health. Previous work on the interaction between these two systems suggests that serotonin modulates photic input to the central circadian clock (the suprachiasmatic nuclei; SCN) from the retina and serves as a signal for locomotor activity, novelty, and arousal to shift the SCN clock, but effects of disruption of serotonergic signaling from the raphe nuclei on circadian behavior and on SCN function are not fully characterized. In this study, we examined the effects on diurnal and circadian behavior, and on ex vivo molecular rhythms of the SCN, of genetic deficiency in Pet-1, an ETS transcription factor that is necessary to establish and maintain the serotonergic phenotype of raphe neurons. Pet-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit loss of rhythmic behavioral coherence and an extended daily activity duration, as well as changes in the molecular rhythms expressed by the clock, such that ex vivo SCN from Pet-1⁻/⁻ mice exhibit period lengthening and sex-dependent changes in rhythmic amplitude. Together, our results indicate that Pet-1 regulation of raphe neuron serotonin phenotype contributes to the period, precision and light/dark partitioning of locomotor behavioral rhythms by the circadian clock through direct actions on the SCN clock itself, as well as through non-clock effects.
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MeSH Terms
Genetic variants associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema.
Pare G, Kubo M, Byrd JB, McCarty CA, Woodard-Grice A, Teo KK, Anand SS, Zuvich RL, Bradford Y, Ross S, Nakamura Y, Ritchie M, Brown NJ
(2013) Pharmacogenet Genomics 23: 470-8
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Angioedema, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Benzimidazoles, Benzoates, Double-Blind Method, Drug Therapy, Combination, European Continental Ancestry Group, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Isoenzymes, Neprilysin, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Kinase C, Protein Kinase C-theta, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Ramipril, Repressor Proteins, Telmisartan
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
OBJECTIVE - The objective of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-associated angioedema.
PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS - We carried out a genome-wide association study in 175 individuals with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema and 489 ACE inhibitor-exposed controls from Nashville (Tennessee) and Marshfield (Wisconsin). We tested for replication in 19 cases and 57 controls who participated in Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET).
RESULTS - There were no genome-wide significant associations of any single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with angioedema. Sixteen SNPs in African Americans and 41 SNPs in European Americans were associated moderately with angioedema (P<10) and evaluated for association in ONTARGET. The T allele of rs500766 in PRKCQ was associated with a reduced risk, whereas the G allele of rs2724635 in ETV6 was associated with an increased risk of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema in the Nashville/Marshfield sample and ONTARGET. In a candidate gene analysis, rs989692 in the gene encoding neprilysin (MME), an enzyme that degrades bradykinin and substance P, was significantly associated with angioedema in ONTARGET and Nashville/Marshfield African Americans.
CONCLUSION - Unlike other serious adverse drug effects, ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema is not associated with a variant with a large effect size. Variants in MME and genes involved in immune regulation may be associated with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema.
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19 MeSH Terms
SPDEF functions as a colorectal tumor suppressor by inhibiting β-catenin activity.
Noah TK, Lo YH, Price A, Chen G, King E, Washington MK, Aronow BJ, Shroyer NF
(2013) Gastroenterology 144: 1012-1023.e6
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Proliferation, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, Disease Progression, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Neoplasms, Experimental, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, RNA, Neoplasm, Tissue Array Analysis, Tumor Cells, Cultured, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Expression of the SAM pointed domain containing ETS transcription factor (SPDEF or prostate-derived ETS factor) is regulated by Atoh1 and is required for the differentiation of goblet and Paneth cells. SPDEF has been reported to suppress the development of breast, prostate, and colon tumors. We analyzed levels of SPDEF in colorectal tumor samples from patients and its tumor-suppressive functions in mouse models of colorectal cancer (CRC).
METHODS - We analyzed levels of SPDEF messenger RNA and protein in more than 500 human CRC samples and more than 80 nontumor controls. Spdef(-/-)and wild-type mice (controls) were either bred with Apc(Min/+) mice, or given azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), or 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and DSS, to induce colorectal tumors. Expression of Spdef also was induced transiently by administration of tetracycline to Spdef(dox-intestine) mice with established tumors, induced by the combination of AOM and DSS or by breeding with Apc(Min/+) mice. Colon tissues were collected and analyzed for tumor number, size, grade, and for cell proliferation and apoptosis. We also analyzed the effects of SPDEF expression in HCT116 and SW480 human CRC cells.
RESULTS - In colorectal tumors from patients, loss of SPDEF was observed in approximately 85% of tumors and correlated with progression from normal tissue, to adenoma, to adenocarcinoma. Spdef(-/-); Apc(Min/+) mice developed approximately 3-fold more colon tumors than Spdef(+/+); Apc(Min/+) mice. Likewise, Spdef(-/-) mice developed approximately 3-fold more colon tumors than Spdef(+/+) mice after administration of AOM and DSS. After administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and DSS, invasive carcinomas were observed exclusively in Spdef(-/-) mice. Conversely, expression of SPDEF was sufficient to promote cell-cycle exit in cells of established adenomas from Spdef(dox-intestine); Apc(Min/+) mice and in Spdef(dox-intestine) mice after administration of AOM + DSS. SPDEF inhibited the expression of β-catenin-target genes in mouse colon tumors, and interacted with β-catenin to block its transcriptional activity in CRC cell lines, resulting in lower levels of cyclin D1 and c-MYC.
CONCLUSIONS - SPDEF is a colon tumor suppressor and a candidate therapeutic target for colon adenomas and adenocarcinoma.
Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
ATXN1 protein family and CIC regulate extracellular matrix remodeling and lung alveolarization.
Lee Y, Fryer JD, Kang H, Crespo-Barreto J, Bowman AB, Gao Y, Kahle JJ, Hong JS, Kheradmand F, Orr HT, Finegold MJ, Zoghbi HY
(2011) Dev Cell 21: 746-57
MeSH Terms: Animals, Ataxin-1, Ataxins, Biomarkers, Blotting, Western, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Immunoenzyme Techniques, Male, Matrix Metalloproteinase 9, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Nuclear Proteins, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Organogenesis, Phenotype, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Pulmonary Alveoli, RNA, Messenger, Repressor Proteins, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Although expansion of CAG repeats in ATAXIN1 (ATXN1) causes Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, the functions of ATXN1 and ATAXIN1-Like (ATXN1L) remain poorly understood. To investigate the function of these proteins, we generated and characterized Atxn1L(-/-) and Atxn1(-/-); Atxn1L(-/-) mice. Atxn1L(-/-) mice have hydrocephalus, omphalocele, and lung alveolarization defects. These phenotypes are more penetrant and severe in Atxn1(-/-); Atxn1L(-/-) mice, suggesting that ATXN1 and ATXN1L are functionally redundant. Upon pursuing the molecular mechanism, we discovered that several Matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp) genes are overexpressed and that the transcriptional repressor Capicua (CIC) is destabilized in Atxn1L(-/-) lungs. Consistent with this, Cic deficiency causes lung alveolarization defect. Loss of either ATXN1L or CIC derepresses Etv4, an activator for Mmp genes, thereby mediating MMP9 overexpression. These findings demonstrate a critical role of ATXN1/ATXN1L-CIC complexes in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling during development and their potential roles in pathogenesis of disorders affecting ECM remodeling.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms
Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-dependent depletion of mucus in immature small intestine: a potential role in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis.
McElroy SJ, Prince LS, Weitkamp JH, Reese J, Slaughter JC, Polk DB
(2011) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 301: G656-66
MeSH Terms: Animals, Enterocolitis, Necrotizing, Goblet Cells, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestine, Small, Mice, Mucin-2, Mucin-3, Mucins, Mucus, Paneth Cells, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I, Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type II, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added February 27, 2014
Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. NEC is believed to occur when intestinal bacteria invade the intestinal epithelial layer, causing subsequent inflammation and tissue necrosis. Mucins are produced and secreted by epithelial goblet cells as a key component of the innate immune system and barrier function of the intestinal tract that help protect against bacterial invasion. To better understand the role of mucins in NEC, we quantified the number of mucus-containing small intestinal goblet cells present in infants with NEC and found they had significantly fewer goblet cells and Paneth cells compared with controls. To test whether inflammation has a developmentally dependent effect on intestinal goblet cells, TNF-α was injected into mice at various stages of intestinal development. TNF-α caused a loss of mucus-containing goblet cells only in immature mice and induced Muc2 and Muc3 mRNA upregulation only in mature ileum. Only minimal changes were seen in apoptosis and in expression of markers of goblet cell differentiation. TNF-α increased small intestinal mucus secretion and goblet cell hypersensitivity to prostaglandin E2 (PGE(2)), a known mucus secretagogue produced by macrophages. These TNF-α-induced changes in mucus mRNA levels required TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2), whereas TNF-α-induced loss of mucus-positive goblet cells required TNFR1. Our findings of developmentally dependent TNF-α-induced alterations on intestinal mucus may help explain why NEC is predominantly found in premature infants, and TNF-α-induced alterations of the intestinal innate immune system and barrier functions may play a role in the pathogenesis of NEC itself.
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2 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
ATR signalling: more than meeting at the fork.
Nam EA, Cortez D
(2011) Biochem J 436: 527-36
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Ataxia Telangiectasia, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Proteins, BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein, Carrier Proteins, Cell Cycle Proteins, DNA Damage, DNA Helicases, DNA Repair, DNA-Binding Proteins, Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group Proteins, Humans, MutL Protein Homolog 1, MutS DNA Mismatch-Binding Protein, Nuclear Proteins, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Preservation of genome integrity via the DNA-damage response is critical to prevent disease. ATR (ataxia telangiectasia mutated- and Rad3-related) is essential for life and functions as a master regulator of the DNA-damage response, especially during DNA replication. ATR controls and co-ordinates DNA replication origin firing, replication fork stability, cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. Since its identification 15 years ago, a model of ATR activation and signalling has emerged that involves localization to sites of DNA damage and activation through protein-protein interactions. Recent research has added an increasingly detailed understanding of the canonical ATR pathway, and an appreciation that the canonical model does not fully capture the complexity of ATR regulation. In the present article, we review the ATR signalling process, focusing on mechanistic findings garnered from the identification of new ATR-interacting proteins and substrates. We discuss how to incorporate these new insights into a model of ATR regulation and point out the significant gaps in our understanding of this essential genome-maintenance pathway.
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21 MeSH Terms
The novel ETS factor TEL2 cooperates with Myc in B lymphomagenesis.
Cardone M, Kandilci A, Carella C, Nilsson JA, Brennan JA, Sirma S, Ozbek U, Boyd K, Cleveland JL, Grosveld GC
(2005) Mol Cell Biol 25: 2395-405
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, B-Lymphocytes, Burkitt Lymphoma, Cell Proliferation, Child, DNA-Binding Proteins, Female, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc, Suppression, Genetic, Transcription Factors, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The human ETS family gene TEL2/ETV7 is highly homologous to TEL1/ETV6, a frequent target of chromosome translocations in human leukemia and specific solid tumors. Here we report that TEL2 augments the proliferation and survival of normal mouse B cells and dramatically accelerates lymphoma development in Emu-Myc transgenic mice. Nonetheless, inactivation of the p53 pathway was a hallmark of all TEL2/Emu-Myc lymphomas, indicating that TEL2 expression alone is insufficient to bypass this apoptotic checkpoint. Although TEL2 is infrequently up-regulated in human sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma, analysis of pediatric B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL) samples showed increased coexpression of TEL2 and MYC and/or MYCN in over one-third of B-ALL patients. Therefore, TEL2 and MYC also appear to cooperate in provoking a cadre of human B-cell malignancies.
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19 MeSH Terms
TEL contacts multiple co-repressors and specifically associates with histone deacetylase-3.
Wang L, Hiebert SW
(2001) Oncogene 20: 3716-25
MeSH Terms: 3T3 Cells, Acetylation, Animals, Binding Sites, COS Cells, Chlorocebus aethiops, Chromosome Mapping, DNA-Binding Proteins, Genes, Tumor Suppressor, Histone Deacetylases, Histones, Matrix Metalloproteinase 3, Mice, Mutagenesis, Nuclear Proteins, Nuclear Receptor Co-Repressor 1, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets, Repressor Proteins, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
TEL (Translocation-ETS-Leukemia or ETV 6) is disrupted by multiple chromosomal translocations in acute leukemia. The loss of heterozygosity at the TEL locus in leukemias and the hemizygous deletion of TEL that is observed in various tumors, suggests that TEL is a tumor suppressor. Overexpression of TEL alters cellular morphology and represses the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Based on these studies, deletion analysis was used to define the minimal repression domains of TEL. TEL-mediated repression required both the N-terminal pointed domain and a central region composed of amino acids 268-303. The mSin3A and N-CoR corepressors bind to the pointed domain and the central repression domain of TEL, respectively. Unexpectedly, histone deacetylase-3, but not other histone deacetylases, also associates with the central region of TEL. Histone deacetylase-3 interacts with a TEL mutant that cannot bind N-CoR, suggesting that this is a direct interaction with TEL. In addition, histone H3 was under-acetylated near the TEL-binding sites in the endogenous stromelysin-1 promoter when TEL was expressed. Furthermore, trichostatin A, a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor, impaired TEL-dependent repression of the stromelysin-1 promoter. Finally, while TEL-expression induced cellular aggregation of Ras-transformed cells, Trichostatin A reversed the TEL-induced cellular aggregation phenotype. Thus, the cumulative data suggests that histone deacetylase-3 activity is required for the transcriptional functions of TEL.
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20 MeSH Terms