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Acute kidney injury is a risk factor for subsequent proteinuria.
Parr SK, Matheny ME, Abdel-Kader K, Greevy RA, Bian A, Fly J, Chen G, Speroff T, Hung AM, Ikizler TA, Siew ED
(2018) Kidney Int 93: 460-469
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Antihypertensive Agents, Blood Pressure, Comorbidity, Databases, Factual, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Nephropathies, Disease Progression, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Hospitalization, Hospitals, Veterans, Humans, Hypertension, Kidney, Male, Middle Aged, Prevalence, Prognosis, Proteinuria, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, Time Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2018
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is associated with subsequent chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanism is unclear. To clarify this, we examined the association of AKI and new-onset or worsening proteinuria during the 12 months following hospitalization in a national retrospective cohort of United States Veterans hospitalized between 2004-2012. Patients with and without AKI were matched using baseline demographics, comorbidities, proteinuria, estimated glomerular filtration rate, blood pressure, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) use, and inpatient exposures linked to AKI. The distribution of proteinuria over one year post-discharge in the matched cohort was compared using inverse probability sampling weights. Subgroup analyses were based on diabetes, pre-admission ACEI/ARB use, and AKI severity. Among the 90,614 matched AKI and non-AKI pairs, the median estimated glomerular filtration rate was 62 mL/min/1.73m. The prevalence of diabetes and hypertension were 48% and 78%, respectively. The odds of having one plus or greater dipstick proteinuria was significantly higher during each month of follow-up in patients with AKI than in patients without AKI (odds ratio range 1.20-1.39). Odds were higher in patients with Stage II or III AKI (odds ratios 1.32-1.81) than in Stage I AKI (odds ratios 1.18-1.32), using non-AKI as the reference group. Results were consistent regardless of diabetes status or baseline ACEI/ARB use. Thus, AKI is a risk factor for incident or worsening proteinuria, suggesting a possible mechanism linking AKI and future CKD. The type of proteinuria, physiology, and clinical significance warrant further study as a potentially modifiable risk factor in the pathway from AKI to CKD.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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29 MeSH Terms
Glypican-5 Increases Susceptibility to Nephrotic Damage in Diabetic Kidney.
Okamoto K, Honda K, Doi K, Ishizu T, Katagiri D, Wada T, Tomita K, Ohtake T, Kaneko T, Kobayashi S, Nangaku M, Tokunaga K, Noiri E
(2015) Am J Pathol 185: 1889-98
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Animals, Cell Line, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Disease Susceptibility, Female, Fibroblast Growth Factor 2, Glomerular Mesangium, Glypicans, Humans, Hyperglycemia, Kidney, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Male, Mesangial Cells, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Nephrotic Syndrome, Podocytes, Proteinuria, Rats
Show Abstract · Added February 11, 2016
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a leading health issue worldwide. Among cases of diabetes mellitus nephropathy (DN), the major complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the nephrotic phenotype is often intractable to clinical intervention and demonstrates the rapid decline of renal function to end-stage renal disease. We recently identified the gene for glypican-5 (GPC5), a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, as conferring susceptibility for acquired nephrotic syndrome and additionally identified an association through a genome-wide association study between a variant in GPC5 and DN of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In vivo and in vitro data showed a progressive increase of GPC5 in type 2 DN along with severity; the excess was derived from glomerular mesangial cells. In this study, diabetic kidney showed that accumulation of fibroblast growth factor (Fgf)2 strikingly induced progressive proteinuria that was avoided in Gpc5 knockdown mice. The efficacy of Gpc5 inhibition was exerted through expression of the Fgf receptors 3 and 4 provoked in the diabetic kidney attributively. Extraglomerular Fgf2 was pathogenic in DN, and the deterrence of Gpc5 effectively inhibited the glomerular accumulation of Fgf2, the subsequent increase of mesangial extracellular matrix, and the podocytes' small GTPase activity. These findings elucidate the pivotal role of GPC5, identified as a susceptible gene in the genome-wide association study, in hyperglycemia-induced glomerulopathy.
Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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25 MeSH Terms
Proteinuria Increases Plasma Phosphate by Altering Its Tubular Handling.
de Seigneux S, Courbebaisse M, Rutkowski JM, Wilhelm-Bals A, Metzger M, Khodo SN, Hasler U, Chehade H, Dizin E, Daryadel A, Stengel B, NephroTest Study Group, Girardin E, Prié D, Wagner CA, Scherer PE, Martin PY, Houillier P, Feraille E
(2015) J Am Soc Nephrol 26: 1608-18
MeSH Terms: Adult, Albuminuria, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Benzimidazoles, Blotting, Western, Child, Disease Models, Animal, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Humans, Kidney Tubules, Proximal, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Nephrotic Syndrome, Parathyroid Hormone, Phosphates, Prospective Studies, Proteinuria, Rats, Rats, Wistar, Sensitivity and Specificity, Sodium-Phosphate Cotransporter Proteins, Type IIa, Tetrazoles, Urinalysis
Show Abstract · Added December 26, 2018
Proteinuria and hyperphosphatemia are cardiovascular risk factors independent of GFR. We hypothesized that proteinuria induces relative phosphate retention via increased proximal tubule phosphate reabsorption. To test the clinical relevance of this hypothesis, we studied phosphate handling in nephrotic children and patients with CKD. Plasma fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) concentration, plasma phosphate concentration, and tubular reabsorption of phosphate increased during the proteinuric phase compared with the remission phase in nephrotic children. Cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of 1738 patients with CKD showed that albuminuria≥300 mg/24 hours is predictive of higher phosphate levels, independent of GFR and other confounding factors. Albuminuric patients also displayed higher plasma FGF-23 and parathyroid hormone levels. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations, we induced glomerular proteinuria in two animal models. Rats with puromycin-aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic proteinuria displayed higher renal protein expression of the sodium-phosphate co-transporter NaPi-IIa, lower renal Klotho protein expression, and decreased phosphorylation of FGF receptor substrate 2α, a major FGF-23 receptor substrate. These findings were confirmed in transgenic mice that develop nephrotic-range proteinuria resulting from podocyte depletion. In vitro, albumin did not directly alter phosphate uptake in cultured proximal tubule OK cells. In conclusion, we show that proteinuria increases plasma phosphate concentration independent of GFR. This effect relies on increased proximal tubule NaPi-IIa expression secondary to decreased FGF-23 biologic activity. Proteinuria induces elevation of both plasma phosphate and FGF-23 concentrations, potentially contributing to cardiovascular disease.
Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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MeSH Terms
Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.
Matheny ME, Peterson JF, Eden SK, Hung AM, Speroff T, Abdel-Kader K, Parr SK, Ikizler TA, Siew ED
(2014) PLoS One 9: e103746
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Creatinine, Databases, Factual, Female, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Hospitalization, Humans, Incidence, Kidney Function Tests, Male, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Hormone, Patient Outcome Assessment, Phosphorus, Proteinuria, Public Health Surveillance, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added August 16, 2014
BACKGROUND - Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI) are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort.
METHODS - We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR) of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2). Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients.
RESULTS - A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients.
CONCLUSIONS - Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.
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20 MeSH Terms
Optimizing blood pressure control in patients with nondiabetic glomerular disease.
Umanath K, Lewis JB, Dwyer JP
(2014) Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 21: 200-4
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Diet, Sodium-Restricted, Humans, Hypertension, Patient Care Planning, Proteinuria, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Severity of Illness Index, Smoking Cessation
Show Abstract · Added October 28, 2014
Hypertension is a common problem among patients with glomerular disease and CKD. Optimal blood pressure targets for these patients have been the source of much debate. Careful review of the available data supports a blood pressure target of less than 140/90 mmHg. Consideration for a lower goal of less than 130/80 mmHg should be given for patients with heavy proteinuria. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitors should be used as the cornerstone of therapy for all patients with glomerular disease and CKD.
Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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10 MeSH Terms
Podocyte-associated talin1 is critical for glomerular filtration barrier maintenance.
Tian X, Kim JJ, Monkley SM, Gotoh N, Nandez R, Soda K, Inoue K, Balkin DM, Hassan H, Son SH, Lee Y, Moeckel G, Calderwood DA, Holzman LB, Critchley DR, Zent R, Reiser J, Ishibe S
(2014) J Clin Invest 124: 1098-113
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Animals, Calpain, Cell Adhesion, Cells, Cultured, Focal Adhesions, Glomerular Filtration Barrier, Humans, Integrin beta1, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Nephrotic Syndrome, Podocytes, Proteinuria, Proteolysis, Renal Insufficiency, Talin
Show Abstract · Added February 25, 2014
Podocytes are specialized actin-rich epithelial cells that line the kidney glomerular filtration barrier. The interface between the podocyte and the glomerular basement membrane requires integrins, and defects in either α3 or β1 integrin, or the α3β1 ligand laminin result in nephrotic syndrome in murine models. The large cytoskeletal protein talin1 is not only pivotal for integrin activation, but also directly links integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we found that mice lacking talin1 specifically in podocytes display severe proteinuria, foot process effacement, and kidney failure. Loss of talin1 in podocytes caused only a modest reduction in β1 integrin activation, podocyte cell adhesion, and cell spreading; however, the actin cytoskeleton of podocytes was profoundly altered by the loss of talin1. Evaluation of murine models of glomerular injury and patients with nephrotic syndrome revealed that calpain-induced talin1 cleavage in podocytes might promote pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of calpain activity following glomerular injury substantially reduced talin1 cleavage, albuminuria, and foot process effacement. Collectively, these findings indicate that podocyte talin1 is critical for maintaining the integrity of the glomerular filtration barrier and provide insight into the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome.
1 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Homocysteine metabolism in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.
Kundal M, Saha A, Dubey NK, Kapoor K, Basak T, Bhardwaj G, Tanwar VS, Sengupta S, Batra V, Upadhayay AD, Bhatt A
(2014) Clin Transl Sci 7: 132-6
MeSH Terms: Case-Control Studies, Child, Cholesterol, Cysteine, Demography, Female, Folic Acid, Homocysteine, Humans, Male, Nephrotic Syndrome, Proteinuria, Remission Induction, Serum Albumin, Vitamin B 12
Show Abstract · Added November 3, 2017
BACKGROUND - Homocysteine metabolism is altered in children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor of early atherosclerosis and glomerulosclerosis and may occur at time of first occurrence of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.
METHODS - Thirty children with first episode of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (FENS) aged 1-16 years along with 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Homocysteine and cysteine were measured with HPLC; vitamin B12 and folic acid were measured with electro-chemilumiscence immunoassay. Primary outcome measure was plasma homocysteine level in children with FENS and in controls. Secondary outcome measures were (1) plasma and urine homocysteine and cysteine levels in children with FENS at 12 weeks and 1 year (remission) and (2) plasma and urine levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid in children with FENS, at 12 weeks and 1 year (remission).
RESULTS - Plasma homocysteine and cysteine levels were comparable to controls in children with FENS, at 12 weeks and 1-year remission. Plasma levels of vitamin B12 and folic acid were significantly decreased compared to controls in FENS due to increased urinary excretion, which normalize during remission at 12 weeks and 1 year. Urinary homocysteine and cysteine levels were significantly raised in FENS compared to controls and continued to be raised even at 12-week and 1-year remission.
CONCLUSION - Homocysteine metabolism is deranged in children with FENS. Renal effects of long-term raised urinary homocysteine levels need to be studied.
© 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
APOL1 risk variants, race, and progression of chronic kidney disease.
Parsa A, Kao WH, Xie D, Astor BC, Li M, Hsu CY, Feldman HI, Parekh RS, Kusek JW, Greene TH, Fink JC, Anderson AH, Choi MJ, Wright JT, Lash JP, Freedman BI, Ojo A, Winkler CA, Raj DS, Kopp JB, He J, Jensvold NG, Tao K, Lipkowitz MS, Appel LJ, AASK Study Investigators, CRIC Study Investigators
(2013) N Engl J Med 369: 2183-96
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Apolipoprotein L1, Apolipoproteins, Creatinine, Diabetes Complications, Disease Progression, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Humans, Hypertension, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Lipoproteins, HDL, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Proteinuria, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2014
BACKGROUND - Among patients in the United States with chronic kidney disease, black patients are at increased risk for end-stage renal disease, as compared with white patients.
METHODS - In two studies, we examined the effects of variants in the gene encoding apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) on the progression of chronic kidney disease. In the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK), we evaluated 693 black patients with chronic kidney disease attributed to hypertension. In the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, we evaluated 2955 white patients and black patients with chronic kidney disease (46% of whom had diabetes) according to whether they had 2 copies of high-risk APOL1 variants (APOL1 high-risk group) or 0 or 1 copy (APOL1 low-risk group). In the AASK study, the primary outcome was a composite of end-stage renal disease or a doubling of the serum creatinine level. In the CRIC study, the primary outcomes were the slope in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the composite of end-stage renal disease or a reduction of 50% in the eGFR from baseline.
RESULTS - In the AASK study, the primary outcome occurred in 58.1% of the patients in the APOL1 high-risk group and in 36.6% of those in the APOL1 low-risk group (hazard ratio in the high-risk group, 1.88; P<0.001). There was no interaction between APOL1 status and trial interventions or the presence of baseline proteinuria. In the CRIC study, black patients in the APOL1 high-risk group had a more rapid decline in the eGFR and a higher risk of the composite renal outcome than did white patients, among those with diabetes and those without diabetes (P<0.001 for all comparisons).
CONCLUSIONS - Renal risk variants in APOL1 were associated with the higher rates of end-stage renal disease and progression of chronic kidney disease that were observed in black patients as compared with white patients, regardless of diabetes status. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others.).
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22 MeSH Terms
mVps34 deletion in podocytes causes glomerulosclerosis by disrupting intracellular vesicle trafficking.
Chen J, Chen MX, Fogo AB, Harris RC, Chen JK
(2013) J Am Soc Nephrol 24: 198-207
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autophagy, Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Cytoplasmic Vesicles, Female, Gene Deletion, Glomerulosclerosis, Focal Segmental, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Microscopy, Electron, Podocytes, Protein Transport, Proteinuria, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added August 19, 2013
Recent studies have suggested that autophagy is a key mechanism in maintaining the integrity of podocytes. The mammalian homologue of yeast vacuolar protein sorting defective 34 (mVps34) has been implicated in the regulation of autophagy, but its role in podocytes is unknown. We generated a line of podocyte-specific mVps34-knockout (mVps34(pdKO)) mice, which were born at Mendelian ratios. These mice appeared grossly normal at 2 weeks of age but exhibited growth retardation and were significantly smaller than control mice by 6 weeks of age, with no difference in ratios of kidney to body weight. mVps34(pdKO) mice developed significant proteinuria by 3 weeks of age, developed severe kidney lesions by 5-6 weeks of age, and died before 9 weeks of age. There was striking podocyte vacuolization and proteinaceous casts, with marked glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis by 6 weeks of age. Electron microscopy revealed numerous enlarged vacuoles and increased autophagosomes in the podocytes, with complete foot process effacement and irregular and thickened glomerular basement membranes. Immunoblotting of isolated glomerular lysates revealed markedly elevated markers specific for lysosomes (LAMP1 and LAMP2) and autophagosomes (LC3-II/I). Immunofluorescence staining confirmed that the enlarged vacuoles originated from lysosomes. In conclusion, these results demonstrate an indispensable role for mVps34 in the trafficking of intracellular vesicles to protect the normal cellular metabolism, structure, and function of podocytes.
2 Communities
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16 MeSH Terms
Nonproteinuric diabetic nephropathy: when diabetics don't read the textbook.
Dwyer JP, Lewis JB
(2013) Med Clin North Am 97: 53-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Clinical Trials as Topic, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diabetic Nephropathies, Humans, Kidney, Kidney Function Tests, Models, Animal, Proteinuria, Rats, Renin-Angiotensin System
Show Abstract · Added August 19, 2013
Diabetic nephropathy (DN) refers to the structural and functional changes in the kidneys of patients with diabetes mellitus (type 1 or 2). A subset of patients with presumed DN may not have overt proteinuria as a prerequisite to renal failure, contrary to the classical paradigm. No animal model fully recapitulates the human subset. All studies on this subject are observational and most lack biopsy data. Many mechanisms have been postulated, including use of renin-angiotensin system agents, recurrent bouts of acute kidney injury, genetic predisposition, and renal lesions other than DN. A well-designed biopsy study and a series of intervention trials are needed to fully understand this entity.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms