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N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an anti-oxidant, does not improve bone mechanical properties in a rat model of progressive chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder.
Allen MR, Wallace J, McNerney E, Nyman J, Avin K, Chen N, Moe S
(2020) PLoS One 15: e0230379
MeSH Terms: Acetylcysteine, Animals, Antioxidants, Caseins, Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Male, Mutation, Nuclear Proteins, Oxidative Stress, Parathyroid Hormone, Rats, Tibia, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
Individuals with chronic kidney disease have elevated levels of oxidative stress and are at a significantly higher risk of skeletal fracture. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in bone and compromise mechanical properties, are known to be driven in part by oxidative stress. The goal of this study was to study effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reducing oxidative stress and improving various bone parameters, most specifically mechanical properties, in an animal model of progressive CKD. Male Cy/+ (CKD) rats and unaffected littermates were untreated (controls) or treated with NAC (80 mg/kg, IP) from 30 to 35 weeks of age. Endpoint measures included serum biochemistries, assessments of systemic oxidative stress, bone morphology, and mechanical properties, and AGE levels in the bone. CKD rats had the expected phenotype that included low kidney function, elevated parathyroid hormone, higher cortical porosity, and compromised mechanical properties. NAC treatment had mixed effects on oxidative stress markers, significantly reducing TBARS (a measure of lipid peroxidation) while not affecting 8-OHdG (a marker of DNA oxidation) levels. AGE levels in the bone were elevated in CKD animals and were reduced with NAC although this did not translate to a benefit in bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, NAC failed to significantly improve bone architecture/geometry/mechanical properties in our rat model of progressive CKD.
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19 MeSH Terms
infection damages colonic stem cells via TcdB, impairing epithelial repair and recovery from disease.
Mileto SJ, Jardé T, Childress KO, Jensen JL, Rogers AP, Kerr G, Hutton ML, Sheedlo MJ, Bloch SC, Shupe JA, Horvay K, Flores T, Engel R, Wilkins S, McMurrick PJ, Lacy DB, Abud HE, Lyras D
(2020) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 117: 8064-8073
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Cells, Cultured, Clostridium Infections, Clostridium difficile, Colon, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Frizzled Receptors, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Organoids, Primary Cell Culture, Recombinant Proteins, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Gastrointestinal infections often induce epithelial damage that must be repaired for optimal gut function. While intestinal stem cells are critical for this regeneration process [R. C. van der Wath, B. S. Gardiner, A. W. Burgess, D. W. Smith, 8, e73204 (2013); S. Kozar , 13, 626-633 (2013)], how they are impacted by enteric infections remains poorly defined. Here, we investigate infection-mediated damage to the colonic stem cell compartment and how this affects epithelial repair and recovery from infection. Using the pathogen we show that infection disrupts murine intestinal cellular organization and integrity deep into the epithelium, to expose the otherwise protected stem cell compartment, in a TcdB-mediated process. Exposure and susceptibility of colonic stem cells to intoxication compromises their function during infection, which diminishes their ability to repair the injured epithelium, shown by altered stem cell signaling and a reduction in the growth of colonic organoids from stem cells isolated from infected mice. We also show, using both mouse and human colonic organoids, that TcdB from epidemic ribotype 027 strains does not require Frizzled 1/2/7 binding to elicit this dysfunctional stem cell state. This stem cell dysfunction induces a significant delay in recovery and repair of the intestinal epithelium of up to 2 wk post the infection peak. Our results uncover a mechanism by which an enteric pathogen subverts repair processes by targeting stem cells during infection and preventing epithelial regeneration, which prolongs epithelial barrier impairment and creates an environment in which disease recurrence is likely.
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17 MeSH Terms
PEGylated PLGA Nanoparticle Delivery of Eggmanone for T Cell Modulation: Applications in Rheumatic Autoimmunity.
Haycook CP, Balsamo JA, Glass EB, Williams CH, Hong CC, Major AS, Giorgio TD
(2020) Int J Nanomedicine 15: 1215-1228
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoimmunity, CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cytokines, Drug Delivery Systems, Female, Hedgehog Proteins, Immunoglobulin Fragments, Immunologic Factors, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nanoparticles, Polylactic Acid-Polyglycolic Acid Copolymer, Pyrimidinones, Rheumatic Diseases, T-Lymphocytes, T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer, Thiophenes
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Background - Helper T cell activity is dysregulated in a number of diseases including those associated with rheumatic autoimmunity. Treatment options are limited and usually consist of systemic immune suppression, resulting in undesirable consequences from compromised immunity. Hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been implicated in the activation of T cells and the formation of the immune synapse, but remains understudied in the context of autoimmunity. Modulation of Hh signaling has the potential to enable controlled immunosuppression but a potential therapy has not yet been developed to leverage this opportunity.
Methods - In this work, we developed biodegradable nanoparticles to enable targeted delivery of eggmanone (Egm), a specific Hh inhibitor, to CD4 T cell subsets. We utilized two FDA-approved polymers, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and polyethylene glycol, to generate hydrolytically degradable nanoparticles. Furthermore, we employed maleimide-thiol mediated conjugation chemistry to decorate nanoparticles with anti-CD4 F(ab') antibody fragments to enable targeted delivery of Egm.
Results - Our novel delivery system achieved a highly specific association with the majority of CD4 T cells present among a complex cell population. Additionally, we have demonstrated antigen-specific inhibition of CD4 T cell responses mediated by nanoparticle-formulated Egm.
Conclusion - This work is the first characterization of Egm's immunomodulatory potential. Importantly, this study also suggests the potential benefit of a biodegradable delivery vehicle that is rationally designed for preferential interaction with a specific immune cell subtype for targeted modulation of Hh signaling.
© 2020 Haycook et al.
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17 MeSH Terms
Development of a novel murine model of lymphatic metastasis.
Banan B, Beckstead JA, Dunavant LE, Sohn Y, Adcock JM, Nomura S, Abumrad N, Goldenring JR, Fingleton B
(2020) Clin Exp Metastasis 37: 247-255
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Colonic Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Humans, Luciferases, Luminescent Measurements, Lymph Nodes, Lymphatic Metastasis, Lymphatic Vessels, Male, Mesentery, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Stomach Neoplasms, Tomography, Optical, Tumor Burden
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Current laboratory models of lymphatic metastasis generally require either genetically modified animals or are technically challenging. Herein, we have developed a robust protocol for the induction of intralymphatic metastasis in wild-type mice with reproducible outcomes. To determine an optimal injection quantity and timeline for tumorigenesis, C57Bl/6 mice were injected directly into the mesenteric lymph duct (MLD) with varying numbers of syngeneic murine colon cancer cells (MC38) or gastric cancer cells (YTN16) expressing GFP/luciferase and monitored over 2-4 weeks. Tumor growth was tracked via whole-animal in vivo bioluminescence imaging (IVIS). Our data indicate that the injection of tumor cells into the MLD is a viable model for lymphatic metastasis as necropsies revealed large tumor burdens and metastasis in regional lymph nodes. This protocol enables a closer study of the role of lymphatics in cancer metastasis and opens a window for the development of novel approaches for treatment of metastatic diseases.
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19 MeSH Terms
Multi-state design of flexible proteins predicts sequences optimal for conformational change.
Sauer MF, Sevy AM, Crowe JE, Meiler J
(2020) PLoS Comput Biol 16: e1007339
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Protein Conformation, Proteins, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
Computational protein design of an ensemble of conformations for one protein-i.e., multi-state design-determines the side chain identity by optimizing the energetic contributions of that side chain in each of the backbone conformations. Sampling the resulting large sequence-structure search space limits the number of conformations and the size of proteins in multi-state design algorithms. Here, we demonstrated that the REstrained CONvergence (RECON) algorithm can simultaneously evaluate the sequence of large proteins that undergo substantial conformational changes. Simultaneous optimization of side chain conformations across all conformations increased sequence conservation when compared to single-state designs in all cases. More importantly, the sequence space sampled by RECON MSD resembled the evolutionary sequence space of flexible proteins, particularly when confined to predicting the mutational preferences of limited common ancestral descent, such as in the case of influenza type A hemagglutinin. Additionally, we found that sequence positions which require substantial changes in their local environment across an ensemble of conformations are more likely to be conserved. These increased conservation rates are better captured by RECON MSD over multiple conformations and thus multiple local residue environments during design. To quantify this rewiring of contacts at a certain position in sequence and structure, we introduced a new metric designated 'contact proximity deviation' that enumerates contact map changes. This measure allows mapping of global conformational changes into local side chain proximity adjustments, a property not captured by traditional global similarity metrics such as RMSD or local similarity metrics such as changes in φ and ψ angles.
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4 MeSH Terms
Analysis of a Therapeutic Antibody Cocktail Reveals Determinants for Cooperative and Broad Ebolavirus Neutralization.
Gilchuk P, Murin CD, Milligan JC, Cross RW, Mire CE, Ilinykh PA, Huang K, Kuzmina N, Altman PX, Hui S, Gunn BM, Bryan AL, Davidson E, Doranz BJ, Turner HL, Alkutkar T, Flinko R, Orlandi C, Carnahan R, Nargi R, Bombardi RG, Vodzak ME, Li S, Okoli A, Ibeawuchi M, Ohiaeri B, Lewis GK, Alter G, Bukreyev A, Saphire EO, Geisbert TW, Ward AB, Crowe JE
(2020) Immunity 52: 388-403.e12
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Cell Line, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Therapy, Combination, Ebolavirus, Epitopes, Female, Glycoproteins, Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola, Humans, Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments, Macaca mulatta, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Molecular Mimicry, Protein Conformation
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2020
Structural principles underlying the composition of protective antiviral monoclonal antibody (mAb) cocktails are poorly defined. Here, we exploited antibody cooperativity to develop a therapeutic mAb cocktail against Ebola virus. We systematically analyzed the antibody repertoire in human survivors and identified a pair of potently neutralizing mAbs that cooperatively bound to the ebolavirus glycoprotein (GP). High-resolution structures revealed that in a two-antibody cocktail, molecular mimicry was a major feature of mAb-GP interactions. Broadly neutralizing mAb rEBOV-520 targeted a conserved epitope on the GP base region. mAb rEBOV-548 bound to a glycan cap epitope, possessed neutralizing and Fc-mediated effector function activities, and potentiated neutralization by rEBOV-520. Remodeling of the glycan cap structures by the cocktail enabled enhanced GP binding and virus neutralization. The cocktail demonstrated resistance to virus escape and protected non-human primates (NHPs) against Ebola virus disease. These data illuminate structural principles of antibody cooperativity with implications for development of antiviral immunotherapeutics.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Neuronal L-Type Calcium Channel Signaling to the Nucleus Requires a Novel CaMKIIα-Shank3 Interaction.
Perfitt TL, Wang X, Dickerson MT, Stephenson JR, Nakagawa T, Jacobson DA, Colbran RJ
(2020) J Neurosci 40: 2000-2014
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium Channels, L-Type, Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2, Cell Nucleus, Gene Expression Regulation, Hippocampus, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurons, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
The activation of neuronal plasma membrane Ca channels stimulates many intracellular responses. Scaffolding proteins can preferentially couple specific Ca channels to distinct downstream outputs, such as increased gene expression, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie the exquisite specificity of these signaling pathways are incompletely understood. Here, we show that complexes containing CaMKII and Shank3, a postsynaptic scaffolding protein known to interact with L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), can be specifically coimmunoprecipitated from mouse forebrain extracts. Activated purified CaMKIIα also directly binds Shank3 between residues 829 and 1130. Mutation of Shank3 residues Arg-Arg-Lys to three alanines disrupts CaMKII binding and CaMKII association with Shank3 in heterologous cells. Our shRNA/rescue studies revealed that Shank3 binding to both CaMKII and LTCCs is important for increased phosphorylation of the nuclear CREB transcription factor and expression of c-Fos induced by depolarization of cultured hippocampal neurons. Thus, this novel CaMKII-Shank3 interaction is essential for the initiation of a specific long-range signal from LTCCs in the plasma membrane to the nucleus that is required for activity-dependent changes in neuronal gene expression during learning and memory. Precise neuronal expression of genes is essential for normal brain function. Proteins involved in signaling pathways that underlie activity-dependent gene expression, such as CaMKII, Shank3, and L-type calcium channels, are often mutated in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. Shank3 and CaMKII were previously shown to bind L-type calcium channels, and we show here that Shank3 also binds to CaMKII. Our data show that each of these interactions is required for depolarization-induced phosphorylation of the CREB nuclear transcription factor, which stimulates the expression of c-Fos, a neuronal immediate early gene with key roles in synaptic plasticity, brain development, and behavior.
Copyright © 2020 the authors.
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11 MeSH Terms
Phenome-based approach identifies RIC1-linked Mendelian syndrome through zebrafish models, biobank associations and clinical studies.
Unlu G, Qi X, Gamazon ER, Melville DB, Patel N, Rushing AR, Hashem M, Al-Faifi A, Chen R, Li B, Cox NJ, Alkuraya FS, Knapik EW
(2020) Nat Med 26: 98-109
MeSH Terms: Abnormalities, Multiple, Animals, Behavior, Animal, Biological Specimen Banks, Chondrocytes, Disease Models, Animal, Extracellular Matrix, Fibroblasts, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors, Humans, Models, Biological, Musculoskeletal System, Osteogenesis, Phenomics, Phenotype, Procollagen, Protein Transport, Secretory Pathway, Syndrome, Zebrafish, Zebrafish Proteins
Show Abstract · Added January 15, 2020
Discovery of genotype-phenotype relationships remains a major challenge in clinical medicine. Here, we combined three sources of phenotypic data to uncover a new mechanism for rare and common diseases resulting from collagen secretion deficits. Using a zebrafish genetic screen, we identified the ric1 gene as being essential for skeletal biology. Using a gene-based phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) in the EHR-linked BioVU biobank, we show that reduced genetically determined expression of RIC1 is associated with musculoskeletal and dental conditions. Whole-exome sequencing identified individuals homozygous-by-descent for a rare variant in RIC1 and, through a guided clinical re-evaluation, it was discovered that they share signs with the BioVU-associated phenome. We named this new Mendelian syndrome CATIFA (cleft lip, cataract, tooth abnormality, intellectual disability, facial dysmorphism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) and revealed further disease mechanisms. This gene-based, PheWAS-guided approach can accelerate the discovery of clinically relevant disease phenome and associated biological mechanisms.
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21 MeSH Terms
A key interaction with RPA orients XPA in NER complexes.
Topolska-Woś AM, Sugitani N, Cordoba JJ, Le Meur KV, Le Meur RA, Kim HS, Yeo JE, Rosenberg D, Hammel M, Schärer OD, Chazin WJ
(2020) Nucleic Acids Res 48: 2173-2188
MeSH Terms: DNA, DNA Damage, DNA Repair, DNA, Single-Stranded, DNA-Binding Proteins, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Models, Molecular, Protein Binding, Replication Protein A, Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
The XPA protein functions together with the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein RPA as the central scaffold to ensure proper positioning of repair factors in multi-protein nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. We previously determined the structure of a short motif in the disordered XPA N-terminus bound to the RPA32C domain. However, a second contact between the XPA DNA-binding domain (XPA DBD) and the RPA70AB tandem ssDNA-binding domains, which is likely to influence the orientation of XPA and RPA on the damaged DNA substrate, remains poorly characterized. NMR was used to map the binding interfaces of XPA DBD and RPA70AB. Combining NMR and X-ray scattering data with comprehensive docking and refinement revealed how XPA DBD and RPA70AB orient on model NER DNA substrates. The structural model enabled design of XPA mutations that inhibit the interaction with RPA70AB. These mutations decreased activity in cell-based NER assays, demonstrating the functional importance of XPA DBD-RPA70AB interaction. Our results inform ongoing controversy about where XPA is bound within the NER bubble, provide structural insights into the molecular basis for malfunction of disease-associated XPA missense mutations, and contribute to understanding of the structure and mechanical action of the NER machinery.
© The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.
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11 MeSH Terms
Discovery and Structure-Based Optimization of Potent and Selective WD Repeat Domain 5 (WDR5) Inhibitors Containing a Dihydroisoquinolinone Bicyclic Core.
Tian J, Teuscher KB, Aho ER, Alvarado JR, Mills JJ, Meyers KM, Gogliotti RD, Han C, Macdonald JD, Sai J, Shaw JG, Sensintaffar JL, Zhao B, Rietz TA, Thomas LR, Payne WG, Moore WJ, Stott GM, Kondo J, Inoue M, Coffey RJ, Tansey WP, Stauffer SR, Lee T, Fesik SW
(2020) J Med Chem 63: 656-675
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Bridged Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic, Cell Cycle, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Chromatin, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drug Design, Drug Discovery, Epigenetic Repression, Genes, myc, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Quinolones, Structure-Activity Relationship, WD40 Repeats
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
WD repeat domain 5 (WDR5) is a member of the WD40-repeat protein family that plays a critical role in multiple chromatin-centric processes. Overexpression of WDR5 correlates with a poor clinical outcome in many human cancers, and WDR5 itself has emerged as an attractive target for therapy. Most drug-discovery efforts center on the WIN site of WDR5 that is responsible for the recruitment of WDR5 to chromatin. Here, we describe discovery of a novel WDR5 WIN site antagonists containing a dihydroisoquinolinone bicyclic core using a structure-based design. These compounds exhibit picomolar binding affinity and selective concentration-dependent antiproliferative activities in sensitive MLL-fusion cell lines. Furthermore, these WDR5 WIN site binders inhibit proliferation in MYC-driven cancer cells and reduce MYC recruitment to chromatin at MYC/WDR5 co-bound genes. Thus, these molecules are useful probes to study the implication of WDR5 inhibition in cancers and serve as a potential starting point toward the discovery of anti-WDR5 therapeutics.
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16 MeSH Terms