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Structures of the AMPA receptor in complex with its auxiliary subunit cornichon.
Nakagawa T
(2019) Science 366: 1259-1263
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Cryoelectron Microscopy, Glutamic Acid, Ion Channel Gating, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Transport, Rats, Receptors, AMPA, Receptors, Glutamate, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
In the brain, AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) form complexes with their auxiliary subunits and mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission. Signals transduced by these complexes are critical for synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. The two major categories of AMPAR auxiliary subunits are transmembrane AMPAR regulatory proteins (TARPs) and cornichon homologs (CNIHs); these subunits share little homology and play distinct roles in controlling ion channel gating and trafficking of AMPAR. Here, I report high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy structures of AMPAR in complex with CNIH3. Contrary to its predicted membrane topology, CNIH3 lacks an extracellular domain and instead contains four membrane-spanning helices. The protein-protein interaction interface that dictates channel modulation and the lipids surrounding the complex are revealed. These structures provide insights into the molecular mechanism for ion channel modulation and assembly of AMPAR/CNIH3 complexes.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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11 MeSH Terms
Functional and structural similarity of human DNA primase [4Fe4S] cluster domain constructs.
Holt ME, Salay LE, O'Brien E, Barton JK, Chazin WJ
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0209345
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Circular Dichroism, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, DNA Primase, Molecular Docking Simulation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Structure, Secondary, RNA
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The regulatory subunit of human DNA primase has a C-terminal domain (p58C) that contains a [4Fe4S] cluster and binds DNA. Previous electrochemical analysis of a p58C construct revealed that its affinity for DNA is sensitive to the redox state of the [4Fe4S] cluster. Concerns about the validity of this conclusion have been raised, based in part on differences in X-ray crystal structures of the p58C272-464 construct used for that study and that of a N-terminally shifted p58C266-456 construct and consequently, an assumption that p58C272-464 has abnormal physical and functional properties. To address this controversy, a new p58C266-464 construct containing all residues was crystallized under the conditions previously used for crystallizing p58C272-464, and the solution structures of both constructs were assessed using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy. In the new crystal structure, p58C266-464 exhibits the same elements of secondary structure near the DNA binding site as observed in the crystal structure of p58C272-464. Moreover, in solution, circular dichroism and 15N,1H-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectra show there are no significant differences in the distribution of secondary structures or in the tertiary structure or the two constructs. To validate that the two constructs have the same functional properties, binding of a primed DNA template was measured using a fluorescence-based DNA binding assay, and the affinities for this substrate were the same (3.4 ± 0.5 μM and 2.7 ± 0.3 μM, respectively). The electrochemical properties of p58C266-464 were also measured and this p58C construct was able to engage in redox switching on DNA with the same efficiency as p58C272-464. Together, these results show that although p58C can be stabilized in different conformations in the crystalline state, in solution there is effectively no difference in the structure and functional properties of p58C constructs of different lengths.
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12 MeSH Terms
Crystallographic and kinetic analyses of human IPMK reveal disordered domains modulate ATP binding and kinase activity.
Seacrist CD, Blind RD
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 16672
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Crystallography, Humans, Inositol Phosphates, Kinetics, Phosphorylation, Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor), Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Secondary, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added January 19, 2019
Inositol polyphosphate multikinase (IPMK) is a member of the IPK-superfamily of kinases, catalyzing phosphorylation of several soluble inositols and the signaling phospholipid PI(4,5)P (PIP). IPMK also has critical non-catalytic roles in p53, mTOR/Raptor, TRAF6 and AMPK signaling mediated partly by two disordered domains. Although IPMK non-catalytic functions are well established, it is less clear if the disordered domains are important for IPMK kinase activity or ATP binding. Here, kinetic and structural analyses of an engineered human IPMK lacking all disordered domains (ΔIPMK) are presented. Although the K for PIP is identical between ΔIPMK and wild type, ΔIPMK has a 1.8-fold increase in k for PIP, indicating the native IPMK disordered domains decrease IPMK activity in vitro. The 2.5 Å crystal structure of ΔIPMK is reported, confirming the conserved ATP-grasp fold. A comparison with other IPK-superfamily structures revealed a putative "ATP-clamp" in the disordered N-terminus, we predicted would stabilize ATP binding. Consistent with this observation, removal of the ATP clamp sequence increases the K for ATP 4.9-fold, indicating the N-terminus enhances ATP binding to IPMK. Together, these structural and kinetic studies suggest in addition to mediating protein-protein interactions, the disordered domains of IPMK impart modulatory capacity to IPMK kinase activity through multiple kinetic mechanisms.
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10 MeSH Terms
Large-scale whole-exome sequencing association studies identify rare functional variants influencing serum urate levels.
Tin A, Li Y, Brody JA, Nutile T, Chu AY, Huffman JE, Yang Q, Chen MH, Robinson-Cohen C, Macé A, Liu J, Demirkan A, Sorice R, Sedaghat S, Swen M, Yu B, Ghasemi S, Teumer A, Vollenweider P, Ciullo M, Li M, Uitterlinden AG, Kraaij R, Amin N, van Rooij J, Kutalik Z, Dehghan A, McKnight B, van Duijn CM, Morrison A, Psaty BM, Boerwinkle E, Fox CS, Woodward OM, Köttgen A
(2018) Nat Commun 9: 4228
MeSH Terms: Exome, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Glucose Transport Proteins, Facilitative, Humans, Kidney Function Tests, Meta-Analysis as Topic, Organic Anion Transporters, Organic Cation Transport Proteins, Protein Structure, Secondary, Uric Acid
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2019
Elevated serum urate levels can cause gout, an excruciating disease with suboptimal treatment. Previous GWAS identified common variants with modest effects on serum urate. Here we report large-scale whole-exome sequencing association studies of serum urate and kidney function among ≤19,517 European ancestry and African-American individuals. We identify aggregate associations of low-frequency damaging variants in the urate transporters SLC22A12 (URAT1; p = 1.3 × 10) and SLC2A9 (p = 4.5 × 10). Gout risk in rare SLC22A12 variant carriers is halved (OR = 0.5, p = 4.9 × 10). Selected rare variants in SLC22A12 are validated in transport studies, confirming three as loss-of-function (R325W, R405C, and T467M) and illustrating the therapeutic potential of the new URAT1-blocker lesinurad. In SLC2A9, mapping of rare variants of large effects onto the predicted protein structure reveals new residues that may affect urate binding. These findings provide new insights into the genetic architecture of serum urate, and highlight molecular targets in SLC22A12 and SLC2A9 for lowering serum urate and preventing gout.
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MeSH Terms
Bid maintains mitochondrial cristae structure and function and protects against cardiac disease in an integrative genomics study.
Salisbury-Ruf CT, Bertram CC, Vergeade A, Lark DS, Shi Q, Heberling ML, Fortune NL, Okoye GD, Jerome WG, Wells QS, Fessel J, Moslehi J, Chen H, Roberts LJ, Boutaud O, Gamazon ER, Zinkel SS
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein, Beclin-1, Cell Respiration, Fibrosis, Gene Expression Regulation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Heart Diseases, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases, Mutation, Myeloid Progenitor Cells, Myocardial Infarction, Myocytes, Cardiac, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Subunits, Reactive Oxygen Species, Reproducibility of Results, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2018
Bcl-2 family proteins reorganize mitochondrial membranes during apoptosis, to form pores and rearrange cristae. In vitro and in vivo analysis integrated with human genetics reveals a novel homeostatic mitochondrial function for Bcl-2 family protein Bid. Loss of full-length Bid results in apoptosis-independent, irregular cristae with decreased respiration. mice display stress-induced myocardial dysfunction and damage. A gene-based approach applied to a biobank, validated in two independent GWAS studies, reveals that decreased genetically determined BID expression associates with myocardial infarction (MI) susceptibility. Patients in the bottom 5% of the expression distribution exhibit >4 fold increased MI risk. Carrier status with nonsynonymous variation in Bid's membrane binding domain, Bid, associates with MI predisposition. Furthermore, Bid but not Bid associates with Mcl-1, previously implicated in cristae stability; decreased MCL-1 expression associates with MI. Our results identify a role for Bid in homeostatic mitochondrial cristae reorganization, that we link to human cardiac disease.
© 2018, Salisbury-Ruf et al.
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26 MeSH Terms
Structural Mechanism of Functional Modulation by Gene Splicing in NMDA Receptors.
Regan MC, Grant T, McDaniel MJ, Karakas E, Zhang J, Traynelis SF, Grigorieff N, Furukawa H
(2018) Neuron 98: 521-529.e3
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Insecta, Protein Splicing, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Alternative gene splicing gives rise to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor ion channels with defined functional properties and unique contributions to calcium signaling in a given chemical environment in the mammalian brain. Splice variants possessing the exon-5-encoded motif at the amino-terminal domain (ATD) of the GluN1 subunit are known to display robustly altered deactivation rates and pH sensitivity, but the underlying mechanism for this functional modification is largely unknown. Here, we show through cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) that the presence of the exon 5 motif in GluN1 alters the local architecture of heterotetrameric GluN1-GluN2 NMDA receptors and creates contacts with the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of the GluN1 and GluN2 subunits, which are absent in NMDA receptors lacking the exon 5 motif. The unique interactions established by the exon 5 motif are essential to the stability of the ATD/LBD and LBD/LBD interfaces that are critically involved in controlling proton sensitivity and deactivation.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Mechanisms of KCNQ1 channel dysfunction in long QT syndrome involving voltage sensor domain mutations.
Huang H, Kuenze G, Smith JA, Taylor KC, Duran AM, Hadziselimovic A, Meiler J, Vanoye CG, George AL, Sanders CR
(2018) Sci Adv 4: eaar2631
MeSH Terms: Cell Membrane, HEK293 Cells, Humans, KCNQ1 Potassium Channel, Leupeptins, Long QT Syndrome, Loss of Function Mutation, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Mutant Proteins, Mutation, Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex, Proteasome Inhibitors, Protein Domains, Protein Folding, Protein Structure, Secondary, Proteolysis
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Mutations that induce loss of function (LOF) or dysfunction of the human KCNQ1 channel are responsible for susceptibility to a life-threatening heart rhythm disorder, the congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). Hundreds of mutations have been identified, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for impaired function are poorly understood. We investigated the impact of 51 KCNQ1 variants with mutations located within the voltage sensor domain (VSD), with an emphasis on elucidating effects on cell surface expression, protein folding, and structure. For each variant, the efficiency of trafficking to the plasma membrane, the impact of proteasome inhibition, and protein stability were assayed. The results of these experiments combined with channel functional data provided the basis for classifying each mutation into one of six mechanistic categories, highlighting heterogeneity in the mechanisms resulting in channel dysfunction or LOF. More than half of the KCNQ1 LOF mutations examined were seen to destabilize the structure of the VSD, generally accompanied by mistrafficking and degradation by the proteasome, an observation that underscores the growing appreciation that mutation-induced destabilization of membrane proteins may be a common human disease mechanism. Finally, we observed that five of the folding-defective LQTS mutant sites are located in the VSD S0 helix, where they interact with a number of other LOF mutation sites in other segments of the VSD. These observations reveal a critical role for the S0 helix as a central scaffold to help organize and stabilize the KCNQ1 VSD and, most likely, the corresponding domain of many other ion channels.
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3 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
G Protein Preassembly Rescues Efficacy of W Toggle Mutations in Neuropeptide Y Receptor.
Kaiser A, Hempel C, Wanka L, Schubert M, Hamm HE, Beck-Sickinger AG
(2018) Mol Pharmacol 93: 387-401
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Binding Sites, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, GTP-Binding Proteins, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Mutation, Neuropeptide Y, Protein Structure, Secondary, Receptors, Neuropeptide Y
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Ligand binding and pathway-specific activation of G protein-coupled receptors is currently being studied with great effort. Individual answers may depend on the nature of the ligands and the effector pathway. Recently, we have presented a detailed model of neuropeptide Y bound to the YR. Accordingly, the C-terminal part of the peptide binds deeply in the transmembrane bundle and brings the side chain of the most essential Y in close proximity to W Here, we investigate the role of this interaction for ligand binding and activation of this receptor. BRET sensors were used for detailed investigation of effector coupling and led to the identification of preassembly of the YR-G complex. It further confirmed ligand-dependent recruitment of arrestin3. Using equally sensitive readouts for G activation and arrestin recruitment as well as quantification with operational models of agonism allowed us to identify a strong inherent bias for G activation over arrestin3 recruitment for the wild-type receptor. By systematic mutagenesis, we found that W does not contribute to the binding affinity, but acts as an allosteric connector to couple ligand binding to G activation and arrestin3 recruitment. However, even mutagenesis to a small threonine did not lead to a complete loss of signaling. Interestingly, signaling was restored to wild-type levels by ligands that contain a naphthylalanine as the C-terminal residue instead of Y Steric and polar contributions of W for the activation of the receptor are discussed in the context of different mechanisms of G protein coupling and arrestin recruitment.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
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The molecular basis of subtype selectivity of human kinin G-protein-coupled receptors.
Joedicke L, Mao J, Kuenze G, Reinhart C, Kalavacherla T, Jonker HRA, Richter C, Schwalbe H, Meiler J, Preu J, Michel H, Glaubitz C
(2018) Nat Chem Biol 14: 284-290
MeSH Terms: Animals, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Insecta, Kinins, Ligands, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Models, Molecular, Molecular Docking Simulation, Mutation, Peptides, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Structure, Secondary, Receptor, Bradykinin B1, Receptor, Bradykinin B2, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Sf9 Cells, Signal Transduction, Static Electricity
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most important signal transducers in higher eukaryotes. Despite considerable progress, the molecular basis of subtype-specific ligand selectivity, especially for peptide receptors, remains unknown. Here, by integrating DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy with advanced molecular modeling and docking, the mechanism of the subtype selectivity of human bradykinin receptors for their peptide agonists has been resolved. The conserved middle segments of the bound peptides show distinct conformations that result in different presentations of their N and C termini toward their receptors. Analysis of the peptide-receptor interfaces reveals that the charged N-terminal residues of the peptides are mainly selected through electrostatic interactions, whereas the C-terminal segments are recognized via both conformations and interactions. The detailed molecular picture obtained by this approach opens a new gateway for exploring the complex conformational and chemical space of peptides and peptide analogs for designing GPCR subtype-selective biochemical tools and drugs.
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20 MeSH Terms
Peptide probes detect misfolded transthyretin oligomers in plasma of hereditary amyloidosis patients.
Schonhoft JD, Monteiro C, Plate L, Eisele YS, Kelly JM, Boland D, Parker CG, Cravatt BF, Teruya S, Helmke S, Maurer M, Berk J, Sekijima Y, Novais M, Coelho T, Powers ET, Kelly JW
(2017) Sci Transl Med 9:
MeSH Terms: Amyloidosis, Familial, Benzoxazoles, Case-Control Studies, Cross-Linking Reagents, Diazomethane, Genotype, Humans, Ions, Light, Molecular Probes, Molecular Weight, Peptides, Prealbumin, Protein Folding, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Secondary, Proteolysis, Proteomics, Solubility
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that soluble misfolded protein assemblies contribute to the degeneration of postmitotic tissue in amyloid diseases. However, there is a dearth of reliable nonantibody-based probes for selectively detecting oligomeric aggregate structures circulating in plasma or deposited in tissues, making it difficult to scrutinize this hypothesis in patients. Hence, understanding the structure-proteotoxicity relationships driving amyloid diseases remains challenging, hampering the development of early diagnostic and novel treatment strategies. We report peptide-based probes that selectively label misfolded transthyretin (TTR) oligomers circulating in the plasma of TTR hereditary amyloidosis patients exhibiting a predominant neuropathic phenotype. These probes revealed that there are much fewer misfolded TTR oligomers in healthy controls, in asymptomatic carriers of mutations linked to amyloid polyneuropathy, and in patients with TTR-associated cardiomyopathies. The absence of misfolded TTR oligomers in the plasma of cardiomyopathy patients suggests that the tissue tropism observed in the TTR amyloidoses is structure-based. Misfolded oligomers decrease in TTR amyloid polyneuropathy patients treated with disease-modifying therapies (tafamidis or liver transplant-mediated gene therapy). In a subset of TTR amyloid polyneuropathy patients, the probes also detected a circulating TTR fragment that disappeared after tafamidis treatment. Proteomic analysis of the isolated TTR oligomers revealed a specific patient-associated signature composed of proteins that likely associate with the circulating TTR oligomers. Quantification of plasma oligomer concentrations using peptide probes could become an early diagnostic strategy, a response-to-therapy biomarker, and a useful tool for understanding structure-proteotoxicity relationships in the TTR amyloidoses.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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