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An alternative N-terminal fold of the intestine-specific annexin A13a induces dimerization and regulates membrane-binding.
McCulloch KM, Yamakawa I, Shifrin DA, McConnell RE, Foegeding NJ, Singh PK, Mao S, Tyska MJ, Iverson TM
(2019) J Biol Chem 294: 3454-3463
MeSH Terms: Animals, Annexins, Cell Membrane, Epithelial Cells, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Intestinal Mucosa, Intestines, Liposomes, Mice, Models, Molecular, Organ Specificity, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Protein Transport
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Annexin proteins function as Ca-dependent regulators of membrane trafficking and repair that may also modulate membrane curvature. Here, using high-resolution confocal imaging, we report that the intestine-specific annexin A13 (ANX A13) localizes to the tips of intestinal microvilli and determined the crystal structure of the ANX A13a isoform to 2.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the N terminus exhibits an alternative fold that converts the first two helices and the associated helix-loop-helix motif into a continuous α-helix, as stabilized by a domain-swapped dimer. We also found that the dimer is present in solution and partially occludes the membrane-binding surfaces of annexin, suggesting that dimerization may function as a means for regulating membrane binding. Accordingly, as revealed by binding and cellular localization assays, ANX A13a variants that favor a monomeric state exhibited increased membrane association relative to variants that favor the dimeric form. Together, our findings support a mechanism for how the association of the ANX A13a isoform with the membrane is regulated.
© 2019 McCulloch et al.
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17 MeSH Terms
Functional and structural similarity of human DNA primase [4Fe4S] cluster domain constructs.
Holt ME, Salay LE, O'Brien E, Barton JK, Chazin WJ
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0209345
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Circular Dichroism, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, DNA Primase, Molecular Docking Simulation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Structure, Secondary, RNA
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The regulatory subunit of human DNA primase has a C-terminal domain (p58C) that contains a [4Fe4S] cluster and binds DNA. Previous electrochemical analysis of a p58C construct revealed that its affinity for DNA is sensitive to the redox state of the [4Fe4S] cluster. Concerns about the validity of this conclusion have been raised, based in part on differences in X-ray crystal structures of the p58C272-464 construct used for that study and that of a N-terminally shifted p58C266-456 construct and consequently, an assumption that p58C272-464 has abnormal physical and functional properties. To address this controversy, a new p58C266-464 construct containing all residues was crystallized under the conditions previously used for crystallizing p58C272-464, and the solution structures of both constructs were assessed using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy. In the new crystal structure, p58C266-464 exhibits the same elements of secondary structure near the DNA binding site as observed in the crystal structure of p58C272-464. Moreover, in solution, circular dichroism and 15N,1H-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectra show there are no significant differences in the distribution of secondary structures or in the tertiary structure or the two constructs. To validate that the two constructs have the same functional properties, binding of a primed DNA template was measured using a fluorescence-based DNA binding assay, and the affinities for this substrate were the same (3.4 ± 0.5 μM and 2.7 ± 0.3 μM, respectively). The electrochemical properties of p58C266-464 were also measured and this p58C construct was able to engage in redox switching on DNA with the same efficiency as p58C272-464. Together, these results show that although p58C can be stabilized in different conformations in the crystalline state, in solution there is effectively no difference in the structure and functional properties of p58C constructs of different lengths.
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Molecular Basis for the Evolution of Species-Specific Hemoglobin Capture by Staphylococcus aureus.
Choby JE, Buechi HB, Farrand AJ, Skaar EP, Barber MF
(2018) MBio 9:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Evolution, Molecular, Hemoglobins, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Iron, Mutation, Primates, Protein Binding, Species Specificity, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2019
Metals are a limiting resource for pathogenic bacteria and must be scavenged from host proteins. Hemoglobin provides the most abundant source of iron in the human body and is required by several pathogens to cause invasive disease. However, the consequences of hemoglobin evolution for bacterial nutrient acquisition remain unclear. Here we show that the α- and β-globin genes exhibit strikingly parallel signatures of adaptive evolution across simian primates. Rapidly evolving sites in hemoglobin correspond to binding interfaces of IsdB, a bacterial hemoglobin receptor harbored by pathogenic Using an evolution-guided experimental approach, we demonstrate that the divergence between primates and staphylococcal isolates governs hemoglobin recognition and bacterial growth. The reintroduction of putative adaptive mutations in α- or β-globin proteins was sufficient to impair binding, providing a mechanism for the evolution of disease resistance. These findings suggest that bacterial hemoprotein capture has driven repeated evolutionary conflicts with hemoglobin during primate descent. During infection, bacteria must steal metals, including iron, from the host tissue. Therefore, pathogenic bacteria have evolved metal acquisition systems to overcome the elaborate processes mammals use to withhold metal from pathogens. uses IsdB, a hemoglobin receptor, to thieve iron-containing heme from hemoglobin within human blood. We find evidence that primate hemoglobin has undergone rapid evolution at protein surfaces contacted by IsdB. Additionally, variation in the hemoglobin sequences among primates, or variation in IsdB of related staphylococci, reduces bacterial hemoglobin capture. Together, these data suggest that has evolved to recognize human hemoglobin in the face of rapid evolution at the IsdB binding interface, consistent with repeated evolutionary conflicts in the battle for iron during host-pathogen interactions.
Copyright © 2018 Choby et al.
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11 MeSH Terms
Activated CaMKII Binds to the mGlu Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor and Modulates Calcium Mobilization.
Marks CR, Shonesy BC, Wang X, Stephenson JR, Niswender CM, Colbran RJ
(2018) Mol Pharmacol 94: 1352-1362
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium, Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2, Calmodulin, Cell Line, Cell Membrane, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Immunoprecipitation, Male, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Protein Binding, Receptor, Metabotropic Glutamate 5, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added November 8, 2018
Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu) are critical signaling molecules in synaptic plasticity and learning/memory. Here, we demonstrate that mGlu is present in CaMKII complexes isolated from mouse forebrain. Further in vitro characterization showed that the membrane-proximal region of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of mGlu directly interacts with purified Thr286-autophosphorylated (activated) CaMKII However, the binding of CaMKII to this CTD fragment is reduced by the addition of excess Ca/calmodulin or by additional CaMKII autophosphorylation at non-Thr286 sites. Furthermore, in vitro binding of CaMKII is dependent on a tribasic residue motif Lys-Arg-Arg (KRR) at residues 866-868 of the mGlu-CTD, and mutation of this motif decreases the coimmunoprecipitation of CaMKII with full-length mGlu expressed in heterologous cells by about 50%. The KRR motif is required for two novel functional effects of coexpressing constitutively active CaMKII with mGlu in heterologous cells. First, cell-surface biotinylation studies showed that CaMKII increases the surface expression of mGlu Second, using Ca fluorimetry and single-cell Ca imaging, we found that CaMKII reduces the initial peak of mGlu-mediated Ca mobilization by about 25% while doubling the relative duration of the Ca signal. These findings provide new insights into the physical and functional coupling of these key regulators of postsynaptic signaling.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
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16 MeSH Terms
Interplay between ER Ca Binding Proteins, STIM1 and STIM2, Is Required for Store-Operated Ca Entry.
Nelson HA, Leech CA, Kopp RF, Roe MW
(2018) Int J Mol Sci 19:
MeSH Terms: 3T3 Cells, Animals, Calcium, Calcium Signaling, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer, Green Fluorescent Proteins, Humans, Membrane Microdomains, Mice, Neoplasm Proteins, ORAI1 Protein, Protein Binding, Stromal Interaction Molecule 1, Stromal Interaction Molecule 2
Show Abstract · Added July 6, 2018
Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), a fundamentally important homeostatic and Ca signaling pathway in many types of cells, is activated by the direct interaction of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca-binding protein, with Ca-selective Orai1 channels localized in the plasma membrane. While much is known about the regulation of SOCE by STIM1, the role of stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2) in SOCE remains incompletely understood. Here, using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats -CRISPR associated protein 9 (CRISPR-Cas9) genomic editing and molecular imaging, we investigated the function of STIM2 in NIH 3T3 fibroblast and αT3 cell SOCE. We found that deletion of expression reduced SOCE by more than 90% in NIH 3T3 cells. STIM1 expression levels were unaffected in the null cells. However, quantitative confocal fluorescence imaging demonstrated that in the absence of expression, STIM1 did not translocate or form punctae in plasma membrane-associated ER membrane (PAM) junctions following ER Ca store depletion. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging of intact, living cells revealed that the formation of STIM1 and Orai1 complexes in PAM nanodomains was significantly reduced in the knockout cells. Our findings indicate that STIM2 plays an essential role in regulating SOCE in NIH 3T3 and αT3 cells and suggests that dynamic interplay between STIM1 and STIM2 induced by ER Ca store discharge is necessary for STIM1 translocation, its interaction with Orai1, and activation of SOCE.
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14 MeSH Terms
Structural and Functional Features of the Reovirus σ1 Tail.
Dietrich MH, Ogden KM, Long JM, Ebenhoch R, Thor A, Dermody TS, Stehle T
(2018) J Virol 92:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Capsid Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Crystallography, X-Ray, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Receptors, Virus, Reoviridae, Reoviridae Infections, Sequence Homology, Virus Attachment, Virus Internalization, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Mammalian orthoreovirus attachment to target cells is mediated by the outer capsid protein σ1, which projects from the virion surface. The σ1 protein is a homotrimer consisting of a filamentous tail, which is partly inserted into the virion; a body domain constructed from β-spiral repeats; and a globular head with receptor-binding properties. The σ1 tail is predicted to form an α-helical coiled coil. Although σ1 undergoes a conformational change during cell entry, the nature of this change and its contributions to viral replication are unknown. Electron micrographs of σ1 molecules released from virions identified three regions of flexibility, including one at the midpoint of the molecule, that may be involved in its structural rearrangement. To enable a detailed understanding of essential σ1 tail organization and properties, we determined high-resolution structures of the reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D) σ1 tail domains. Both molecules feature extended α-helical coiled coils, with T1L σ1 harboring central chloride ions. Each molecule displays a discontinuity (stutter) within the coiled coil and an unexpectedly seamless transition to the body domain. The transition region features conserved interdomain interactions and appears rigid rather than highly flexible. Functional analyses of reoviruses containing engineered σ1 mutations suggest that conserved residues predicted to stabilize the coiled-coil-to-body junction are essential for σ1 folding and encapsidation, whereas central chloride ion coordination and the stutter are dispensable for efficient replication. Together, these findings enable modeling of full-length reovirus σ1 and provide insight into the stabilization of a multidomain virus attachment protein. While it is established that different conformational states of attachment proteins of enveloped viruses mediate receptor binding and membrane fusion, less is understood about how such proteins mediate attachment and entry of nonenveloped viruses. The filamentous reovirus attachment protein σ1 binds cellular receptors; contains regions of predicted flexibility, including one at the fiber midpoint; and undergoes a conformational change during cell entry. Neither the nature of the structural change nor its contribution to viral infection is understood. We determined crystal structures of large σ1 fragments for two different reovirus serotypes. We observed an unexpectedly tight transition between two domains spanning the fiber midpoint, which allows for little flexibility. Studies of reoviruses with engineered changes near the σ1 midpoint suggest that the stabilization of this region is critical for function. Together with a previously determined structure, we now have a complete model of the full-length, elongated reovirus σ1 attachment protein.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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A Mechanism of Calmodulin Modulation of the Human Cardiac Sodium Channel.
Johnson CN, Potet F, Thompson MK, Kroncke BM, Glazer AM, Voehler MW, Knollmann BC, George AL, Chazin WJ
(2018) Structure 26: 683-694.e3
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Calcium, Calmodulin, Crystallography, X-Ray, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Kinetics, Models, Molecular, Mutation, NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Protein Binding
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The function of the human cardiac sodium channel (Na1.5) is modulated by the Ca sensor calmodulin (CaM), but the underlying mechanism(s) are controversial and poorly defined. CaM has been reported to bind in a Ca-dependent manner to two sites in the intracellular loop that is critical for inactivation of Na1.5 (inactivation gate [IG]). The affinity of CaM for the complete IG was significantly stronger than that of fragments that lacked both complete binding sites. Structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance, crystallographic, and scattering approaches revealed that CaM simultaneously engages both IG sites using an extended configuration. Patch-clamp recordings for wild-type and mutant channels with an impaired CaM-IG interaction revealed CaM binding to the IG promotes recovery from inactivation while impeding the kinetics of inactivation. Models of full-length Na1.5 suggest that CaM binding to the IG directly modulates channel function by destabilizing the inactivated state, which would promote resetting of the IG after channels close.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Integrated Structural Biology for α-Helical Membrane Protein Structure Determination.
Xia Y, Fischer AW, Teixeira P, Weiner B, Meiler J
(2018) Structure 26: 657-666.e2
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Binding Sites, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Models, Molecular, Monte Carlo Method, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical, Protein Folding, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Rhodopsin, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
While great progress has been made, only 10% of the nearly 1,000 integral, α-helical, multi-span membrane protein families are represented by at least one experimentally determined structure in the PDB. Previously, we developed the algorithm BCL::MP-Fold, which samples the large conformational space of membrane proteins de novo by assembling predicted secondary structure elements guided by knowledge-based potentials. Here, we present a case study of rhodopsin fold determination by integrating sparse and/or low-resolution restraints from multiple experimental techniques including electron microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Simultaneous incorporation of orthogonal experimental restraints not only significantly improved the sampling accuracy but also allowed identification of the correct fold, which is demonstrated by a protein size-normalized transmembrane root-mean-square deviation as low as 1.2 Å. The protocol developed in this case study can be used for the determination of unknown membrane protein folds when limited experimental restraints are available.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Surface-Matrix Screening Identifies Semi-specific Interactions that Improve Potency of a Near Pan-reactive HIV-1-Neutralizing Antibody.
Kwon YD, Chuang GY, Zhang B, Bailer RT, Doria-Rose NA, Gindin TS, Lin B, Louder MK, McKee K, O'Dell S, Pegu A, Schmidt SD, Asokan M, Chen X, Choe M, Georgiev IS, Jin V, Pancera M, Rawi R, Wang K, Chaudhuri R, Kueltzo LA, Manceva SD, Todd JP, Scorpio DG, Kim M, Reinherz EL, Wagh K, Korber BM, Connors M, Shapiro L, Mascola JR, Kwong PD
(2018) Cell Rep 22: 1798-1809
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Neutralizing, Cell Membrane, HIV Antibodies, HIV Envelope Protein gp41, HIV-1, Half-Life, Humans, Neutralization Tests, Polysaccharides, Protein Binding
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Highly effective HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies could have utility in the prevention or treatment of HIV-1 infection. To improve the potency of 10E8, an antibody capable of near pan-HIV-1 neutralization, we engineered 10E8-surface mutants and screened for improved neutralization. Variants with the largest functional enhancements involved the addition of hydrophobic or positively charged residues, which were positioned to interact with viral membrane lipids or viral glycan-sialic acids, respectively. In both cases, the site of improvement was spatially separated from the region of antibody mediating molecular contact with the protein component of the antigen, thereby improving peripheral semi-specific interactions while maintaining unmodified dominant contacts responsible for broad recognition. The optimized 10E8 antibody, with mutations to phenylalanine and arginine, retained the extraordinary breadth of 10E8 but with ∼10-fold increased potency. We propose surface-matrix screening as a general method to improve antibodies, with improved semi-specific interactions between antibody and antigen enabling increased potency without compromising breadth.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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10 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide analysis of PDX1 target genes in human pancreatic progenitors.
Wang X, Sterr M, Burtscher I, Chen S, Hieronimus A, Machicao F, Staiger H, Häring HU, Lederer G, Meitinger T, Cernilogar FM, Schotta G, Irmler M, Beckers J, Hrabě de Angelis M, Ray M, Wright CVE, Bakhti M, Lickert H
(2018) Mol Metab 9: 57-68
MeSH Terms: Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Enhancer Elements, Genetic, Genome-Wide Association Study, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-beta, Homeodomain Proteins, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Membrane Proteins, Myeloid Ecotropic Viral Integration Site 1 Protein, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Binding, Regulatory Factor X Transcription Factors, Trans-Activators, Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 Protein
Show Abstract · Added February 6, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene coding for the homeobox transcription factor (TF) PDX1 leads to pancreatic agenesis, whereas heterozygous mutations can cause Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young 4 (MODY4). Although the function of Pdx1 is well studied in pre-clinical models during insulin-producing β-cell development and homeostasis, it remains elusive how this TF controls human pancreas development by regulating a downstream transcriptional program. Also, comparative studies of PDX1 binding patterns in pancreatic progenitors and adult β-cells have not been conducted so far. Furthermore, many studies reported the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and T2DM, and it has been shown that islet enhancers are enriched in T2DM-associated SNPs. Whether regions, harboring T2DM-associated SNPs are PDX1 bound and active at the pancreatic progenitor stage has not been reported so far.
METHODS - In this study, we have generated a novel induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) line that efficiently differentiates into human pancreatic progenitors (PPs). Furthermore, PDX1 and H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) was used to identify PDX1 transcriptional targets and active enhancer and promoter regions. To address potential differences in the function of PDX1 during development and adulthood, we compared PDX1 binding profiles from PPs and adult islets. Moreover, combining ChIP-seq and GWAS meta-analysis data we identified T2DM-associated SNPs in PDX1 binding sites and active chromatin regions.
RESULTS - ChIP-seq for PDX1 revealed a total of 8088 PDX1-bound regions that map to 5664 genes in iPSC-derived PPs. The PDX1 target regions include important pancreatic TFs, such as PDX1 itself, RFX6, HNF1B, and MEIS1, which were activated during the differentiation process as revealed by the active chromatin mark H3K27ac and mRNA expression profiling, suggesting that auto-regulatory feedback regulation maintains PDX1 expression and initiates a pancreatic TF program. Remarkably, we identified several PDX1 target genes that have not been reported in the literature in human so far, including RFX3, required for ciliogenesis and endocrine differentiation in mouse, and the ligand of the Notch receptor DLL1, which is important for endocrine induction and tip-trunk patterning. The comparison of PDX1 profiles from PPs and adult human islets identified sets of stage-specific target genes, associated with early pancreas development and adult β-cell function, respectively. Furthermore, we found an enrichment of T2DM-associated SNPs in active chromatin regions from iPSC-derived PPs. Two of these SNPs fall into PDX1 occupied sites that are located in the intronic regions of TCF7L2 and HNF1B. Both of these genes are key transcriptional regulators of endocrine induction and mutations in cis-regulatory regions predispose to diabetes.
CONCLUSIONS - Our data provide stage-specific target genes of PDX1 during in vitro differentiation of stem cells into pancreatic progenitors that could be useful to identify pathways and molecular targets that predispose for diabetes. In addition, we show that T2DM-associated SNPs are enriched in active chromatin regions at the pancreatic progenitor stage, suggesting that the susceptibility to T2DM might originate from imperfect execution of a β-cell developmental program.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms