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Effectiveness of β-Lactam Monotherapy vs Macrolide Combination Therapy for Children Hospitalized With Pneumonia.
Williams DJ, Edwards KM, Self WH, Zhu Y, Arnold SR, McCullers JA, Ampofo K, Pavia AT, Anderson EJ, Hicks LA, Bramley AM, Jain S, Grijalva CG
(2017) JAMA Pediatr 171: 1184-1191
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Drug Therapy, Combination, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Intensive Care Units, Pediatric, Length of Stay, Macrolides, Patient Readmission, Pneumonia, Bacterial, Propensity Score, Radiography, Treatment Outcome, beta-Lactams
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Importance - β-Lactam monotherapy and β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy are both common empirical treatment strategies for children hospitalized with pneumonia, but few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of these 2 treatment approaches.
Objective - To compare the effectiveness of β-lactam monotherapy vs β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy among a cohort of children hospitalized with pneumonia.
Design, Setting, and Participants - We analyzed data from the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study, a multicenter, prospective, population-based study of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations conducted from January 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, in 3 children's hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee; Memphis, Tennessee; and Salt Lake City, Utah. The study included all children (up to 18 years of age) who were hospitalized with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and who received β-lactam monotherapy or β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Data analysis was completed in April 2017.
Main Outcomes and Measures - We defined the referent as β-lactam monotherapy, including exclusive use of an oral or parenteral second- or third-generation cephalosporin, penicillin, ampicillin, ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin, or amoxicillin-clavulanate. Use of a β-lactam plus an oral or parenteral macrolide (azithromycin or clarithromycin) served as the comparison group. We modeled the association between these groups and patients' length of stay using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Covariates included demographic, clinical, and radiographic variables. We further evaluated length of stay in a cohort matched by propensity to receive combination therapy. Logistic regression was used to evaluate secondary outcomes in the unmatched cohort, including intensive care admission, rehospitalizations, and self-reported recovery at follow-up.
Results - Our study included 1418 children (693 girls and 725 boys) with a median age of 27 months (interquartile range, 12-69 months). This cohort was 60.1% of the 2358 children enrolled in the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community Study with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the study period; 1019 (71.9%) received β-lactam monotherapy and 399 (28.1%) received β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. In the unmatched cohort, there was no statistically significant difference in length of hospital stay between children receiving β-lactam monotherapy and combination therapy (median, 55 vs 59 hours; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.74-1.01). The propensity-matched cohort (n = 560, 39.5%) showed similar results. There were also no significant differences between treatment groups for the secondary outcomes.
Conclusions and Relevance - Empirical macrolide combination therapy conferred no benefit over β-lactam monotherapy for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The results of this study elicit questions about the routine empirical use of macrolide combination therapy in this population.
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Fludrocortisone Is Associated With a Higher Risk of All-Cause Hospitalizations Compared With Midodrine in Patients With Orthostatic Hypotension.
Grijalva CG, Biaggioni I, Griffin MR, Shibao CA
(2017) J Am Heart Assoc 6:
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-1 Receptor Agonists, Aged, Blood Pressure, Databases, Factual, Female, Fludrocortisone, Heart Failure, Hospitalization, Humans, Hypotension, Orthostatic, Incidence, Logistic Models, Male, Medicaid, Middle Aged, Midodrine, Multivariate Analysis, Prevalence, Propensity Score, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tennessee, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Vasoconstrictor Agents
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Orthostatic hypotension causes ≈80 000 hospitalizations per year in the United States. Treatments for orthostatic hypotension include fludrocortisone, a mineralocorticoid analog that promotes sodium reabsorption; and midodrine, an α-1 adrenergic agonist that is a direct vasoconstrictor. Although both medications are used to treat orthostatic hypotension, few studies have compared their relative safety.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We compared incidence rates of hospitalizations for all causes, and for congestive heart failure between users of fludrocortisone and users of midodrine in a retrospective cohort study of Tennessee Medicaid adult enrollees (1995-2009). Adjusted incidence rate ratios were calculated using negative binomial regression models. Subgroup analyses based on history of congestive heart failure were conducted. We studied 1324 patients initiating fludrocortisone and 797 patients initiating midodrine. Compared with fludrocortisone users, midodrine users had higher prevalence of cardiovascular conditions. Incidence rates of all-cause hospitalizations for fludrocortisone and midodrine users were 1489 and 1330 per 1000 person-years, respectively (adjusted incidence-rate ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.40). The respective rates of heart failure-related hospitalization were 76 and 84 per 1000 person-years (adjusted incidence-rate ratio: 1.33, 95% confidence interval, 0.79-2.56). Among patients with a history of congestive heart failure, the rates of all-cause hospitalization for fludrocortisone and midodrine were 2448 and 1820 per 1000 person-years (adjusted incidence-rate ratio: 1.42, 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.90), and the respective rates of heart failure exacerbation-related hospitalizations were 297 and 263 per 1000 person-years (adjusted incidence-rate ratio: 1.48, 95% confidence interval, 0.69-3.16).
CONCLUSIONS - Compared with users of midodrine, users of fludrocortisone had higher rates of all-cause hospitalizations, especially among patients with congestive heart failure.
© 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.
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Tuberculosis and risk of acute myocardial infarction: a propensity score-matched analysis.
Huaman MA, Kryscio RJ, Fichtenbaum CJ, Henson D, Salt E, Sterling TR, Garvy BA
(2017) Epidemiol Infect 145: 1363-1367
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prevalence, Propensity Score, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Tuberculosis, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Several pathogens have been associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Whether this occurs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is unclear. We assessed if tuberculosis disease increased the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We identified patients with tuberculosis index claims from a large de-identified database of ~15 million adults enrolled in a U.S. commercial insurance policy between 2008 and 2010. Tuberculosis patients were 1:1 matched to patients without tuberculosis claims using propensity scores. We compared the occurrence of index AMI claims between the tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis cohorts using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox Proportional Hazard models. Data on 2026 patients with tuberculosis and 2026 propensity-matched patients without tuberculosis were included. AMI was more frequent in the tuberculosis cohort compared with the non-tuberculosis cohort, 67 (3·3%) vs. 32 (1·6%) AMI cases, respectively, P < 0·01. Tuberculosis was associated with an increased risk of AMI (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1·98, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1·3-3·0). The results were similar when the analysis was restricted to pulmonary tuberculosis (adjusted HR 2·43, 95% CI 1·5-4·1). Tuberculosis was associated with an increased risk of AMI. CVD risk assessment should be considered in tuberculosis patients. Mechanistic studies of tuberculosis and CVD are warranted.
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Statin Use and Hospital Length of Stay Among Adults Hospitalized With Community-acquired Pneumonia.
Havers F, Bramley AM, Finelli L, Reed C, Self WH, Trabue C, Fakhran S, Balk R, Courtney DM, Girard TD, Anderson EJ, Grijalva CG, Edwards KM, Wunderink RG, Jain S
(2016) Clin Infect Dis 62: 1471-1478
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Cardiovascular Diseases, Community-Acquired Infections, Female, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Pneumonia, Propensity Score, Prospective Studies, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Prior retrospective studies suggest that statins may benefit patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) due to antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. However, prospective studies of the impact of statins on CAP outcomes are needed. We determined whether statin use was associated with improved outcomes in adults hospitalized with CAP.
METHODS - Adults aged ≥18 years hospitalized with CAP were prospectively enrolled at 3 hospitals in Chicago, Illinois, and 2 hospitals in Nashville, Tennessee, from January 2010-June 2012. Adults receiving statins before and throughout hospitalization (statin users) were compared with those who did not receive statins (nonusers). Proportional subdistribution hazards models were used to examine the association between statin use and hospital length of stay (LOS). In-hospital mortality was a secondary outcome. We also compared groups matched on propensity score.
RESULTS - Of 2016 adults enrolled, 483 (24%) were statin users; 1533 (76%) were nonusers. Statin users were significantly older, had more comorbidities, had more years of education, and were more likely to have health insurance than nonusers. Multivariable regression demonstrated that statin users and nonusers had similar LOS (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI], .88-1.12), as did those in the propensity-matched groups (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, .88-1.21). No significant associations were found between statin use and LOS or in-hospital mortality, even when stratified by pneumonia severity.
CONCLUSIONS - In a large prospective study of adults hospitalized with CAP, we found no evidence to suggest that statin use before and during hospitalization improved LOS or in-hospital mortality.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
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Risk of hypoglycemia following intensification of metformin treatment with insulin versus sulfonylurea.
Roumie CL, Min JY, Greevy RA, Grijalva CG, Hung AM, Liu X, Elasy T, Griffin MR
(2016) CMAJ 188: E104-E112
MeSH Terms: Aged, Blood Glucose, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Hypoglycemic Agents, Incidence, Insulin, Male, Metformin, Middle Aged, Propensity Score, Retrospective Studies, Sulfonylurea Compounds, Survival Rate, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
BACKGROUND - Hypoglycemia remains a common life-threatening event associated with diabetes treatment. We compared the risk of first or recurrent hypoglycemia event among metformin initiators who intensified treatment with insulin versus sulfonylurea.
METHODS - We assembled a retrospective cohort using databases of the Veterans Health Administration, Medicare and the National Death Index. Metformin initiators who intensified treatment with insulin or sulfonylurea were followed to either their first or recurrent hypoglycemia event using Cox proportional hazard models. Hypoglycemia was defined as hospital admission or an emergency department visit for hypoglycemia, or an outpatient blood glucose value of less than 3.3 mmol/L. We conducted additional analyses for risk of first hypoglycemia event, with death as the competing risk.
RESULTS - Among 178,341 metformin initiators, 2948 added insulin and 39,990 added sulfonylurea. Propensity score matching yielded 2436 patients taking metformin plus insulin and 12,180 taking metformin plus sulfonylurea. Patients took metformin for a median of 14 (interquartile range [IQR] 5-30) months, and the median glycated hemoglobin level was 8.1% (IQR 7.2%-9.9%) at intensification. In the group who added insulin, 121 first hypoglycemia events occurred, and 466 first events occurred in the group who added sulfonylurea (30.9 v. 24.6 events per 1000 person-years; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-1.59). For recurrent hypoglycemia, there were 159 events in the insulin group and 585 events in the sulfonylurea group (39.1 v. 30.0 per 1000 person-years; adjusted HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.12-1.72). In separate competing risk analyses, the adjusted HR for hypoglycemia was 1.28 (95% CI 1.04-1.56).
INTERPRETATION - Among patients using metformin who could use either insulin or sulfonylurea, the addition of insulin was associated with a higher risk of hypoglycemia than the addition of sulfonylurea. This finding should be considered by patients and clinicians when discussing the risks and benefits of adding insulin versus a sulfonylurea.
© 2016 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.
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Association between Initial Fluid Choice and Subsequent In-hospital Mortality during the Resuscitation of Adults with Septic Shock.
Raghunathan K, Bonavia A, Nathanson BH, Beadles CA, Shaw AD, Brookhart MA, Miller TE, Lindenauer PK
(2015) Anesthesiology 123: 1385-93
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cohort Studies, Crystalloid Solutions, Female, Fluid Therapy, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Isotonic Solutions, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Propensity Score, Resuscitation, Retrospective Studies, Shock, Septic, Sodium Chloride, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added October 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - Currently, guidelines recommend initial resuscitation with intravenous (IV) crystalloids during severe sepsis/septic shock. Albumin is suggested as an alternative. However, fluid mixtures are often used in practice, and it is unclear whether the specific mixture of IV fluids used impacts outcomes. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the specific mixture of IV fluids used during initial resuscitation, in severe sepsis, is associated with important in-hospital outcomes.
METHODS - Retrospective cohort study includes patients with severe sepsis who were resuscitated with at least 2 l of crystalloids and vasopressors by hospital day 2, patients who had not undergone any major surgical procedures, and patients who had a hospital length of stay (LOS) of at least 2 days. Inverse probability weighting, propensity score matching, and hierarchical regression methods were used for risk adjustment. Patients were grouped into four exposure categories: recipients of isotonic saline alone ("Sal" exclusively), saline in combination with balanced crystalloids ("Sal + Bal"), saline in combination with colloids ("Sal + Col"), or saline in combination with balanced crystalloids and colloids ("Sal + Bal + Col"). In-hospital mortality was the primary outcome, and hospital LOS and costs per day (among survivors) were secondary outcomes.
RESULTS - In risk-adjusted Inverse Probability Weighting analyses including 60,734 adults admitted to 360 intensive care units across the United States between January 2006 and December 2010, in-hospital mortality was intermediate in the Sal group (20.2%), lower in the Sal + Bal group (17.7%, P < 0.001), higher in the Sal + Col group (24.2%, P < 0.001), and similar in the Sal + Bal + Col group (19.2%, P = 0.401). In pairwise propensity score-matched comparisons, the administration of balanced crystalloids by hospital day 2 was consistently associated with lower mortality, whether colloids were used (relative risk, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.92) or not (relative risk, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.70 to 0.89). The association between colloid use and in-hospital mortality was inconsistent, and survival was not uniformly affected, whereas LOS and costs per day were uniformly increased. Results were robust in sensitivity analyses.
CONCLUSIONS - During the initial resuscitation of adults with severe sepsis/septic shock, the types of IV fluids used may impact in-hospital mortality. When compared with the administration of isotonic saline exclusively during resuscitation, the coadministration of balanced crystalloids is associated with lower in-hospital mortality and no difference in LOS or costs per day. When colloids are coadministered, LOS and costs per day are increased without improved survival. A large randomized controlled trial evaluating crystalloid choice is warranted. Meanwhile, the use of balanced crystalloids seems reasonable. (Anesthesiology 2015; 123:1385-93).
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Association between perioperative dexmedetomidine and arrhythmias after surgery for congenital heart disease.
Shuplock JM, Smith AH, Owen J, Van Driest SL, Marshall M, Saville B, Xu M, Radbill AE, Fish FA, Kannankeril PJ
(2015) Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 8: 643-50
MeSH Terms: Adrenergic alpha-2 Receptor Agonists, Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Bradycardia, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Chi-Square Distribution, Child, Child, Preschool, Dexmedetomidine, Female, Heart Defects, Congenital, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Logistic Models, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Odds Ratio, Propensity Score, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tachycardia, Tennessee, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2017
BACKGROUND - Dexmedetomidine is commonly used after congenital heart surgery and may be associated with a decreased incidence of postoperative tachyarrhythmias. Using a large cohort of patients undergoing congenital heart surgery, we examined for an association between dexmedetomidine use in the immediate postoperative period and subsequent arrhythmia development.
METHODS AND RESULTS - A total of 1593 surgical procedures for congenital heart disease were performed. Dexmedetomidine was administered in the immediate postoperative period after 468 (29%) surgical procedures. When compared with 1125 controls, the group receiving dexmedetomidine demonstrated significantly fewer tachyarrhythmias (29% versus 38%; P<0.001), tachyarrhythmias receiving intervention (14% versus 23%; P<0.001), bradyarrhythmias (18% versus 22%; P=0.03), and bradyarrhythmias receiving intervention (12% versus 16%; P=0.04). After propensity score matching with 468 controls, the arrhythmia incidence between groups became similar: tachyarrhythmias (29% versus 31%; P=0.66), tachyarrhythmias receiving intervention (14% versus 17%; P=0.16), bradyarrhythmias (18% versus 15%; P=0.44), and bradyarrhythmias receiving intervention (12% versus 9%; P=0.17). After excluding controls exposed to dexmedetomidine at a later time in the hospitalization, dexmedetomidine was associated with increased odds of bradyarrhythmias receiving intervention (odds ratio, 2.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.65). Furthermore, there was a dose-dependent increase in the odds of bradyarrhythmias (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.07) and bradyarrhythmias receiving intervention (odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.08).
CONCLUSIONS - Although dexmedetomidine exposure in the immediate postoperative period is not associated with a clinically meaningful difference in the incidence of tachyarrhythmias after congenital heart surgery, it may be associated with increased odds of bradyarrhythmias.
© 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.
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Association between the choice of IV crystalloid and in-hospital mortality among critically ill adults with sepsis*.
Raghunathan K, Shaw A, Nathanson B, Stürmer T, Brookhart A, Stefan MS, Setoguchi S, Beadles C, Lindenauer PK
(2014) Crit Care Med 42: 1585-91
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Age Factors, Comorbidity, Critical Illness, Crystalloid Solutions, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Fluid Therapy, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Isotonic Solutions, Length of Stay, Propensity Score, Rehydration Solutions, Respiration, Artificial, Resuscitation, Retrospective Studies, Ringer's Lactate, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added October 20, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Isotonic saline is the most commonly used crystalloid in the ICU, but recent evidence suggests that balanced fluids like Lactated Ringer's solution may be preferable. We examined the association between choice of crystalloids and in-hospital mortality during the resuscitation of critically ill adults with sepsis.
DESIGN - A retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with sepsis, not undergoing any surgical procedures, and treated in an ICU by hospital day 2. We used propensity score matching to control for confounding and compared the following outcomes after resuscitation with balanced versus with no-balanced fluids: in-hospital mortality, acute renal failure with and without dialysis, and hospital and ICU lengths of stay. We also estimated the dose-response relationship between receipt of increasing proportions of balanced fluids and in-hospital mortality.
SETTING - Three hundred sixty U.S. hospitals that were members of the Premier Healthcare alliance between November 2005 and December 2010.
PATIENTS - A total of 53,448 patients with sepsis, treated with vasopressors and crystalloids in an ICU by hospital day 2 including 3,396 (6.4%) that received balanced fluids.
INTERVENTIONS - None.
MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - Patients treated with balanced fluids were younger and less likely to have heart or chronic renal failure, but they were more likely to receive mechanical ventilation, invasive monitoring, colloids, steroids, and larger crystalloid volumes (median 7 vs 5 L). Among 6,730 patients in a propensity-matched cohort, receipt of balanced fluids was associated with lower in-hospital mortality (19.6% vs 22.8%; relative risk, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.78, 0.94). Mortality was progressively lower among patients receiving larger proportions of balanced fluids. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of acute renal failure (with and without dialysis) or in-hospital and ICU lengths of stay.
CONCLUSIONS - Among critically ill adults with sepsis, resuscitation with balanced fluids was associated with a lower risk of in-hospital mortality. If confirmed in randomized trials, this finding could have significant public health implications, as crystalloid resuscitation is nearly universal in sepsis.
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Radical cystectomy versus bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma: examining confounding and misclassification biasin cancer observational comparative effectiveness research.
Bekelman JE, Handorf EA, Guzzo T, Evan Pollack C, Christodouleas J, Resnick MJ, Swisher-McClure S, Vaughn D, Ten Have T, Polsky D, Mitra N
(2013) Value Health 16: 610-8
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Carcinoma, Transitional Cell, Cohort Studies, Comparative Effectiveness Research, Computer Simulation, Confounding Factors, Epidemiologic, Cystectomy, Female, Humans, Male, Medicare, Multivariate Analysis, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Staging, Propensity Score, Retrospective Studies, SEER Program, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome, United States, Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
OBJECTIVES - Radical cystectomy (RC) is the standard treatment for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. Trimodality bladder-preserving therapy (BPT) is an alternative to RC, but randomized comparisons of RC versus BPT have proven infeasible. To compare RC versus BPT, we undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare database.
METHODS - We identified patients age 65 years or older diagnosed between 1995 and 2005 who received RC (n = 1426) or BPT (n = 417). We examined confounding and stage misclassification in the comparison of RC and BPT by using multivariable adjustment, propensity score-based adjustment, instrumental variable (IV) analysis, and simulations.
RESULTS - Patients who received BPT were older and more likely to have comorbid disease. After propensity score adjustment, BPT was associated with an increased hazard of death from any cause (hazard ratio [HR] 1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.53) and from bladder cancer (HR 1.31; 95% CI 0.97-1.77). Using the local area cystectomy rate as an instrument, IV analysis demonstrated no differences in survival between BPT and RC (death from any cause HR 1.06; 95% CI 0.78-1.31; death from bladder cancer HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.55-1.18). Simulation studies for stage misclassification yielded results consistent with the IV analysis.
CONCLUSIONS - Survival estimates in an observational cohort of patients who underwent RC versus BPT differ by analytic method. Multivariable and propensity score adjustment revealed greater mortality associated with BPT relative to RC, while IV analysis and simulation studies suggest that the two treatments are associated with similar survival outcomes.
Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Common genetic polymorphism at 4q25 locus predicts atrial fibrillation recurrence after successful cardioversion.
Parvez B, Shoemaker MB, Muhammad R, Richardson R, Jiang L, Blair MA, Roden DM, Darbar D
(2013) Heart Rhythm 10: 849-55
MeSH Terms: Aged, Atrial Fibrillation, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Electric Countershock, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prognosis, Propensity Score, Proportional Hazards Models, Recurrence
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
BACKGROUND - Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous common polymorphisms associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). The 3 loci most strongly associated with AF occur at chromosome 4q25 (near PITX2), 16q22 (in ZFHX3), and 1q21 (in KCNN3).
OBJECTIVE - To evaluate whether timing of AF recurrence after direct current cardioversion (DCCV) is modulated by common AF susceptibility alleles.
METHODS - A total of 208 patients (age 65 ± 11 years; 77% men) with persistent AF underwent successful DCCV and were prospectively evaluated at 3, 6, and 12 months for AF recurrence. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms--rs2200733 and rs10033464 at 4q25, rs7193343 in ZFHX3, and rs13376333 in KCNN3--were genotyped.
RESULTS - The final study cohort consisted of 184 patients. In 162 (88%) patients, sinus rhythm was restored with DCCV, of which 108 (67%) had AF recurrence at a median of 60 (interquartile range 29-176) days. In multivariable analysis, the presence of any common single nucleotide polymorphism (rs2200733, rs10033464) at the 4q25 locus was an independent predictor of AF recurrence (hazard ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.21-3.30; P = .008). Furthermore, rs2200733 exhibited a graded allelic dose response for early AF recurrence (homozygous variants: 7 [interquartile range 4-56] days; heterozygous variants: 54 [28-135] days; and wild type: 64 [29-180] days; P = .03).
CONCLUSIONS - To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate whether genomic markers can predict timing of AF recurrence in patients undergoing elective DCCV. Our findings show that a common polymorphism on chromosome 4q25 (rs2200733) is an independent predictor of AF recurrence after DCCV and point to a potential role of stratification by genotype.
Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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