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Results: 1 to 10 of 21

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Expanding Access to Large-Scale Genomic Data While Promoting Privacy: A Game Theoretic Approach.
Wan Z, Vorobeychik Y, Xia W, Clayton EW, Kantarcioglu M, Malin B
(2017) Am J Hum Genet 100: 316-322
MeSH Terms: Databases, Genetic, Electronic Health Records, Genetic Privacy, Genomics, Humans, Information Dissemination, Models, Theoretical, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Emerging scientific endeavors are creating big data repositories of data from millions of individuals. Sharing data in a privacy-respecting manner could lead to important discoveries, but high-profile demonstrations show that links between de-identified genomic data and named persons can sometimes be reestablished. Such re-identification attacks have focused on worst-case scenarios and spurred the adoption of data-sharing practices that unnecessarily impede research. To mitigate concerns, organizations have traditionally relied upon legal deterrents, like data use agreements, and are considering suppressing or adding noise to genomic variants. In this report, we use a game theoretic lens to develop more effective, quantifiable protections for genomic data sharing. This is a fundamentally different approach because it accounts for adversarial behavior and capabilities and tailors protections to anticipated recipients with reasonable resources, not adversaries with unlimited means. We demonstrate this approach via a new public resource with genomic summary data from over 8,000 individuals-the Sequence and Phenotype Integration Exchange (SPHINX)-and show that risks can be balanced against utility more effectively than with traditional approaches. We further show the generalizability of this framework by applying it to other genomic data collection and sharing endeavors. Recognizing that such models are dependent on a variety of parameters, we perform extensive sensitivity analyses to show that our findings are robust to their fluctuations.
Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Assessing data intrusion threats.
Barth-Jones D, El Emam K, Bambauer J, Cavoukian A, Malin B
(2015) Science 348: 194-5
MeSH Terms: Commerce, Data Collection, Female, Humans, Information Dissemination, Male, Privacy
Added April 10, 2018
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1 Members
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A game theoretic framework for analyzing re-identification risk.
Wan Z, Vorobeychik Y, Xia W, Clayton EW, Kantarcioglu M, Ganta R, Heatherly R, Malin BA
(2015) PLoS One 10: e0120592
MeSH Terms: Databases, Factual, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, Humans, Information Dissemination, Models, Theoretical, Privacy, Risk, Search Engine, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Given the potential wealth of insights in personal data the big databases can provide, many organizations aim to share data while protecting privacy by sharing de-identified data, but are concerned because various demonstrations show such data can be re-identified. Yet these investigations focus on how attacks can be perpetrated, not the likelihood they will be realized. This paper introduces a game theoretic framework that enables a publisher to balance re-identification risk with the value of sharing data, leveraging a natural assumption that a recipient only attempts re-identification if its potential gains outweigh the costs. We apply the framework to a real case study, where the value of the data to the publisher is the actual grant funding dollar amounts from a national sponsor and the re-identification gain of the recipient is the fine paid to a regulator for violation of federal privacy rules. There are three notable findings: 1) it is possible to achieve zero risk, in that the recipient never gains from re-identification, while sharing almost as much data as the optimal solution that allows for a small amount of risk; 2) the zero-risk solution enables sharing much more data than a commonly invoked de-identification policy of the U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); and 3) a sensitivity analysis demonstrates these findings are robust to order-of-magnitude changes in player losses and gains. In combination, these findings provide support that such a framework can enable pragmatic policy decisions about de-identified data sharing.
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A community assessment of privacy preserving techniques for human genomes.
Jiang X, Zhao Y, Wang X, Malin B, Wang S, Ohno-Machado L, Tang H
(2014) BMC Med Inform Decis Mak 14 Suppl 1: S1
MeSH Terms: Genetic Privacy, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Information Dissemination
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
To answer the need for the rigorous protection of biomedical data, we organized the Critical Assessment of Data Privacy and Protection initiative as a community effort to evaluate privacy-preserving dissemination techniques for biomedical data. We focused on the challenge of sharing aggregate human genomic data (e.g., allele frequencies) in a way that preserves the privacy of the data donors, without undermining the utility of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or impeding their dissemination. Specifically, we designed two problems for disseminating the raw data and the analysis outcome, respectively, based on publicly available data from HapMap and from the Personal Genome Project. A total of six teams participated in the challenges. The final results were presented at a workshop of the iDASH (integrating Data for Analysis, 'anonymization,' and SHaring) National Center for Biomedical Computing. We report the results of the challenge and our findings about the current genome privacy protection techniques.
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Direct-to-consumer genomics companies should provide guidance to their customers on (not) sharing personal genomic information.
Garrison NA, Non AL
(2014) Am J Bioeth 14: 55-7
MeSH Terms: Employment, Genetic Privacy, Genetic Testing, Humans, Public Policy, Social Media, Social Networking, Workplace
Added January 20, 2015
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8 MeSH Terms
SecureMA: protecting participant privacy in genetic association meta-analysis.
Xie W, Kantarcioglu M, Bush WS, Crawford D, Denny JC, Heatherly R, Malin BA
(2014) Bioinformatics 30: 3334-41
MeSH Terms: Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Privacy, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Humans, Hypothyroidism, Meta-Analysis as Topic, Obesity, Software
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
MOTIVATION - Sharing genomic data is crucial to support scientific investigation such as genome-wide association studies. However, recent investigations suggest the privacy of the individual participants in these studies can be compromised, leading to serious concerns and consequences, such as overly restricted access to data.
RESULTS - We introduce a novel cryptographic strategy to securely perform meta-analysis for genetic association studies in large consortia. Our methodology is useful for supporting joint studies among disparate data sites, where privacy or confidentiality is of concern. We validate our method using three multisite association studies. Our research shows that genetic associations can be analyzed efficiently and accurately across substudy sites, without leaking information on individual participants and site-level association summaries.
AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION - Our software for secure meta-analysis of genetic association studies, SecureMA, is publicly available at http://github.com/XieConnect/SecureMA. Our customized secure computation framework is also publicly available at http://github.com/XieConnect/CircuitService.
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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9 MeSH Terms
Return of genomic results to research participants: the floor, the ceiling, and the choices in between.
Jarvik GP, Amendola LM, Berg JS, Brothers K, Clayton EW, Chung W, Evans BJ, Evans JP, Fullerton SM, Gallego CJ, Garrison NA, Gray SW, Holm IA, Kullo IJ, Lehmann LS, McCarty C, Prows CA, Rehm HL, Sharp RR, Salama J, Sanderson S, Van Driest SL, Williams MS, Wolf SM, Wolf WA, eMERGE Act-ROR Committee and CERC Committee, CSER Act-ROR Working Group, Burke W
(2014) Am J Hum Genet 94: 818-26
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Disclosure, Genetic Privacy, Genetics, Medical, Genome, Human, Genomics, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Patient Access to Records, Population Groups, Societies, Scientific
Show Abstract · Added January 23, 2015
As more research studies incorporate next-generation sequencing (including whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing), investigators and institutional review boards face difficult questions regarding which genomic results to return to research participants and how. An American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics 2013 policy paper suggesting that pathogenic mutations in 56 specified genes should be returned in the clinical setting has raised the question of whether comparable recommendations should be considered in research settings. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) Consortium and the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) Network are multisite research programs that aim to develop practical strategies for addressing questions concerning the return of results in genomic research. CSER and eMERGE committees have identified areas of consensus regarding the return of genomic results to research participants. In most circumstances, if results meet an actionability threshold for return and the research participant has consented to return, genomic results, along with referral for appropriate clinical follow-up, should be offered to participants. However, participants have a right to decline the receipt of genomic results, even when doing so might be viewed as a threat to the participants' health. Research investigators should be prepared to return research results and incidental findings discovered in the course of their research and meeting an actionability threshold, but they have no ethical obligation to actively search for such results. These positions are consistent with the recognition that clinical research is distinct from medical care in both its aims and its guiding moral principles.
Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Ethical, legal, and social implications of incorporating genomic information into electronic health records.
Hazin R, Brothers KB, Malin BA, Koenig BA, Sanderson SC, Rothstein MA, Williams MS, Clayton EW, Kullo IJ
(2013) Genet Med 15: 810-6
MeSH Terms: Computer Security, Confidentiality, Decision Support Systems, Clinical, Electronic Health Records, Genetic Privacy, Genomics, Health Literacy, Health Records, Personal, Humans, Incidental Findings, Patient Access to Records, Precision Medicine
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
The inclusion of genomic data in the electronic health record raises important ethical, legal, and social issues. In this article, we highlight these challenges and discuss potential solutions. We provide a brief background on the current state of electronic health records in the context of genomic medicine, discuss the importance of equitable access to genome-enabled electronic health records, and consider the potential use of electronic health records for improving genomic literacy in patients and providers. We highlight the importance of privacy, access, and security, and of determining which genomic information is included in the electronic health record. Finally, we discuss the challenges of reporting incidental findings, storing and reinterpreting genomic data, and nondocumentation and duty to warn family members at potential genetic risk.
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Enabling genomic-phenomic association discovery without sacrificing anonymity.
Heatherly RD, Loukides G, Denny JC, Haines JL, Roden DM, Malin BA
(2013) PLoS One 8: e53875
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Databases, Factual, Genetic Association Studies, Genetic Privacy, Genome, Human, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Humans, Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2013
Health information technologies facilitate the collection of massive quantities of patient-level data. A growing body of research demonstrates that such information can support novel, large-scale biomedical investigations at a fraction of the cost of traditional prospective studies. While healthcare organizations are being encouraged to share these data in a de-identified form, there is hesitation over concerns that it will allow corresponding patients to be re-identified. Currently proposed technologies to anonymize clinical data may make unrealistic assumptions with respect to the capabilities of a recipient to ascertain a patients identity. We show that more pragmatic assumptions enable the design of anonymization algorithms that permit the dissemination of detailed clinical profiles with provable guarantees of protection. We demonstrate this strategy with a dataset of over one million medical records and show that 192 genotype-phenotype associations can be discovered with fidelity equivalent to non-anonymized clinical data.
1 Communities
3 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
On sharing quantitative trait GWAS results in an era of multiple-omics data and the limits of genomic privacy.
Im HK, Gamazon ER, Nicolae DL, Cox NJ
(2012) Am J Hum Genet 90: 591-8
MeSH Terms: Female, Gene Frequency, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Humans, Information Dissemination, Male, Metabolomics, Privacy, Proteomics, Quantitative Trait Loci, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Recent advances in genome-scale, system-level measurements of quantitative phenotypes (transcriptome, metabolome, and proteome) promise to yield unprecedented biological insights. In this environment, broad dissemination of results from genome-wide association studies (GWASs) or deep-sequencing efforts is highly desirable. However, summary results from case-control studies (allele frequencies) have been withdrawn from public access because it has been shown that they can be used for inferring participation in a study if the individual's genotype is available. A natural question that follows is how much private information is contained in summary results from quantitative trait GWAS such as regression coefficients or p values. We show that regression coefficients for many SNPs can reveal the person's participation and for participants his or her phenotype with high accuracy. Our power calculations show that regression coefficients contain as much information on individuals as allele frequencies do, if the person's phenotype is rather extreme or if multiple phenotypes are available as has been increasingly facilitated by the use of multiple-omics data sets. These findings emphasize the need to devise a mechanism that allows data sharing that will facilitate scientific progress without sacrificing privacy protection.
Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms