Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 46

Publication Record

Connections

Exposure to Latent Tuberculosis Treatment during Pregnancy. The PREVENT TB and the iAdhere Trials.
Moro RN, Scott NA, Vernon A, Tepper NK, Goldberg SV, Schwartzman K, Leung CC, Schluger NW, Belknap RW, Chaisson RE, Narita M, Machado ES, Lopez M, Sanchez J, Villarino ME, Sterling TR
(2018) Ann Am Thorac Soc 15: 570-580
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Antitubercular Agents, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Administration Schedule, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Isoniazid, Latent Tuberculosis, Middle Aged, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Pregnancy Outcome, Rifampin, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
RATIONALE - Data are limited regarding the safety of 12-dose once-weekly isoniazid (H, 900 mg) plus rifapentine (P, 900 mg) (3HP) for latent infection treatment during pregnancy.
OBJECTIVES - To assess safety and pregnancy outcomes among pregnant women who were inadvertently exposed to study medications in two latent tuberculosis infection trials (PREVENT TB or iAdhere) evaluating 3HP and 9 months of daily isoniazid (H, 300 mg) (9H).
METHODS - Data from reproductive-age (15-51 yr) women who received one or more study dose of 3HP or 9H in either trial were analyzed. Drug exposure during pregnancy occurred if the estimated date of conception was on or before the last dose date.
RESULTS - Of 126 pregnancies (125 participants) that occurred during treatment or follow-up, 87 were exposed to study drugs. Among these, fetal loss was reported for 4/31 (13%) and 8/56 (14%), 3HP and 9H, respectively (difference, 13% - 14% = -1%; 95% confidence interval = -17% to +18%) and congenital anomalies in 0/20 and 2/41 (5%) live births, 3HP and 9H, respectively (difference, 0% - 5% = -5%; 95% confidence interval = -18% to +16%). All fetal losses occurred in pregnancies of less than 20 weeks. Of the total 126 pregnancies, fetal loss was reported in 8/54 (15%) and 9/72 (13%), 3HP and 9H, respectively; and congenital anomalies in 1/37 (3%) and 2/56 (4%) live births, 3HP and 9H, respectively. The overall proportion of fetal loss (17/126 [13%]) and anomalies (3/93 [3%]) were similar to those estimated for the United States, 17% and 3%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - Among reported pregnancies in these two latent tuberculosis infection trials, there was no unexpected fetal loss or congenital anomalies. These data offer some preliminary reassurance to clinicians and patients in circumstances when these drugs and regimens are the best option in pregnancy or in women of child-bearing potential. This work used the identifying trial registration numbers NCT00023452 and NCT01582711, corresponding to the primary clinical trials PREVENT TB and iAdhere (Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 26 and 33).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Erythematous plaques and papules on a premature infant.
Riemenschneider K, Redenius R, Reese J, Fine JD, Weitkamp JH, Tkaczyk E
(2017) J Am Acad Dermatol 76: e111-e112
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Apgar Score, Biopsy, Needle, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gestational Age, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Impetigo, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn, Streptococcal Infections, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2018
A 2240 gram boy was born at 33.2 weeks gestation with nonblanching, deeply erythematous plaques and papules on the back, flanks, and scalp (Figure 1). His mother was GBS positive and on antibiotic suppression for prior cutaneous MRSA and urinary tract infections. Intrapartum intravenous Penicillin G was administered, and the amniotic sac was artificially ruptured 4 hours prior to delivery to facilitate labor. The delivery was uncomplicated without concern for chorioamnionitis, but the patient initially required CPAP for respiratory distress with 1-minute and 5-minute Apgar scores of 7 and 8, respectively. A skin punch biopsy is shown (Figure 2).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Staphylococcus aureus Infection of Human Gestational Membranes Induces Bacterial Biofilm Formation and Host Production of Cytokines.
Doster RS, Kirk LA, Tetz LM, Rogers LM, Aronoff DM, Gaddy JA
(2017) J Infect Dis 215: 653-657
MeSH Terms: Biofilms, Chorioamnionitis, Cytokines, Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Placenta, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Premature Birth, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Staphylococcus aureus, a metabolically flexible gram-positive pathogen, causes infections in a variety of tissues. Recent evidence implicates S. aureus as an emerging cause of chorioamnionitis and premature rupture of membranes, which are associated with preterm birth and neonatal disease. We demonstrate here that S. aureus infects and forms biofilms on the choriodecidual surface of explanted human gestational membranes. Concomitantly, S. aureus elicits the production of proinflammatory cytokines, which could ultimately perturb maternal-fetal tolerance during pregnancy. Therefore, targeting the immunological response to S. aureus infection during pregnancy could attenuate disease among infected individuals, especially in the context of antibiotic resistance.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Pharmacokinetics of efavirenz and treatment of HIV-1 among pregnant women with and without tuberculosis coinfection.
Dooley KE, Denti P, Martinson N, Cohn S, Mashabela F, Hoffmann J, Haas DW, Hull J, Msandiwa R, Castel S, Wiesner L, Chaisson RE, McIlleron H, TSHEPISO Study Team
(2015) J Infect Dis 211: 197-205
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Alkynes, Anti-HIV Agents, Benzoxazines, Cohort Studies, Coinfection, Cyclopropanes, Female, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Humans, Plasma, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Prospective Studies, South Africa, Tuberculosis, Viral Load, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 13, 2015
BACKGROUND - Pregnancy and tuberculosis treatment or prophylaxis can affect efavirenz pharmacokinetics, maternal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) treatment outcomes, and mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) risk.
METHODS - We evaluated a prospective cohort of pregnant, HIV-infected women with and without tuberculosis in Soweto, South Africa. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed at gestation week 37 and during the postpartum period. Efavirenz trough concentrations (Cmin) were predicted using population pharmacokinetic models. HIV-viral load was measured at delivery for mothers and at 6 weeks of age for infants.
RESULTS - Ninety-seven women participated; 44 had tuberculosis. Median efavirenz Cmin during pregnancy was 1.35 µg/mL (interquartile range [IQR], 0.90-2.07 µg/mL; 27% had an efavirenz Cmin of < 1 µg/mL), compared with a median postpartum value of 2.00 µg/mL (IQR, 1.40-3.59 µg/mL; 13% had an efavirenz Cmin of < 1 µg/mL). A total of 72% of pregnant women with extensive CYP2B6 genotypes had an efavirenz Cmin of <1 µg/mL. Rifampin did not reduce the efavirenz Cmin. Isoniazid (for prophylaxis or treatment), though, reduced the rate of efavirenz clearance. At delivery, median durations of ART were 13 weeks (IQR, 9-18 weeks) and 21 weeks (IQR, 13-64 weeks) for women with and those without tuberculosis, respectively; 55% and 83%, respectively, had a viral load of <20 copies/mL (P = .021). There was 1 case of MTCT.
CONCLUSIONS - Pregnancy increased the risk of low efavirenz concentrations, but MTCT was rare. A detectable HIV-viral load at delivery was more common among pregnant women with tuberculosis, in whom ART was generally initiated later.
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Global, regional, and national levels and causes of maternal mortality during 1990-2013: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013.
Kassebaum NJ, Bertozzi-Villa A, Coggeshall MS, Shackelford KA, Steiner C, Heuton KR, Gonzalez-Medina D, Barber R, Huynh C, Dicker D, Templin T, Wolock TM, Ozgoren AA, Abd-Allah F, Abera SF, Abubakar I, Achoki T, Adelekan A, Ademi Z, Adou AK, Adsuar JC, Agardh EE, Akena D, Alasfoor D, Alemu ZA, Alfonso-Cristancho R, Alhabib S, Ali R, Al Kahbouri MJ, Alla F, Allen PJ, AlMazroa MA, Alsharif U, Alvarez E, Alvis-Guzmán N, Amankwaa AA, Amare AT, Amini H, Ammar W, Antonio CA, Anwari P, Arnlöv J, Arsenijevic VS, Artaman A, Asad MM, Asghar RJ, Assadi R, Atkins LS, Badawi A, Balakrishnan K, Basu A, Basu S, Beardsley J, Bedi N, Bekele T, Bell ML, Bernabe E, Beyene TJ, Bhutta Z, Bin Abdulhak A, Blore JD, Basara BB, Bose D, Breitborde N, Cárdenas R, Castañeda-Orjuela CA, Castro RE, Catalá-López F, Cavlin A, Chang JC, Che X, Christophi CA, Chugh SS, Cirillo M, Colquhoun SM, Cooper LT, Cooper C, da Costa Leite I, Dandona L, Dandona R, Davis A, Dayama A, Degenhardt L, De Leo D, del Pozo-Cruz B, Deribe K, Dessalegn M, deVeber GA, Dharmaratne SD, Dilmen U, Ding EL, Dorrington RE, Driscoll TR, Ermakov SP, Esteghamati A, Faraon EJ, Farzadfar F, Felicio MM, Fereshtehnejad SM, de Lima GM, Forouzanfar MH, França EB, Gaffikin L, Gambashidze K, Gankpé FG, Garcia AC, Geleijnse JM, Gibney KB, Giroud M, Glaser EL, Goginashvili K, Gona P, González-Castell D, Goto A, Gouda HN, Gugnani HC, Gupta R, Gupta R, Hafezi-Nejad N, Hamadeh RR, Hammami M, Hankey GJ, Harb HL, Havmoeller R, Hay SI, Pi IB, Hoek HW, Hosgood HD, Hoy DG, Husseini A, Idrisov BT, Innos K, Inoue M, Jacobsen KH, Jahangir E, Jee SH, Jensen PN, Jha V, Jiang G, Jonas JB, Juel K, Kabagambe EK, Kan H, Karam NE, Karch A, Karema CK, Kaul A, Kawakami N, Kazanjan K, Kazi DS, Kemp AH, Kengne AP, Kereselidze M, Khader YS, Khalifa SE, Khan EA, Khang YH, Knibbs L, Kokubo Y, Kosen S, Defo BK, Kulkarni C, Kulkarni VS, Kumar GA, Kumar K, Kumar RB, Kwan G, Lai T, Lalloo R, Lam H, Lansingh VC, Larsson A, Lee JT, Leigh J, Leinsalu M, Leung R, Li X, Li Y, Li Y, Liang J, Liang X, Lim SS, Lin HH, Lipshultz SE, Liu S, Liu Y, Lloyd BK, London SJ, Lotufo PA, Ma J, Ma S, Machado VM, Mainoo NK, Majdan M, Mapoma CC, Marcenes W, Marzan MB, Mason-Jones AJ, Mehndiratta MM, Mejia-Rodriguez F, Memish ZA, Mendoza W, Miller TR, Mills EJ, Mokdad AH, Mola GL, Monasta L, de la Cruz Monis J, Hernandez JC, Moore AR, Moradi-Lakeh M, Mori R, Mueller UO, Mukaigawara M, Naheed A, Naidoo KS, Nand D, Nangia V, Nash D, Nejjari C, Nelson RG, Neupane SP, Newton CR, Ng M, Nieuwenhuijsen MJ, Nisar MI, Nolte S, Norheim OF, Nyakarahuka L, Oh IH, Ohkubo T, Olusanya BO, Omer SB, Opio JN, Orisakwe OE, Pandian JD, Papachristou C, Park JH, Caicedo AJ, Patten SB, Paul VK, Pavlin BI, Pearce N, Pereira DM, Pesudovs K, Petzold M, Poenaru D, Polanczyk GV, Polinder S, Pope D, Pourmalek F, Qato D, Quistberg DA, Rafay A, Rahimi K, Rahimi-Movaghar V, ur Rahman S, Raju M, Rana SM, Refaat A, Ronfani L, Roy N, Pimienta TG, Sahraian MA, Salomon JA, Sampson U, Santos IS, Sawhney M, Sayinzoga F, Schneider IJ, Schumacher A, Schwebel DC, Seedat S, Sepanlou SG, Servan-Mori EE, Shakh-Nazarova M, Sheikhbahaei S, Shibuya K, Shin HH, Shiue I, Sigfusdottir ID, Silberberg DH, Silva AP, Singh JA, Skirbekk V, Sliwa K, Soshnikov SS, Sposato LA, Sreeramareddy CT, Stroumpoulis K, Sturua L, Sykes BL, Tabb KM, Talongwa RT, Tan F, Teixeira CM, Tenkorang EY, Terkawi AS, Thorne-Lyman AL, Tirschwell DL, Towbin JA, Tran BX, Tsilimbaris M, Uchendu US, Ukwaja KN, Undurraga EA, Uzun SB, Vallely AJ, van Gool CH, Vasankari TJ, Vavilala MS, Venketasubramanian N, Villalpando S, Violante FS, Vlassov VV, Vos T, Waller S, Wang H, Wang L, Wang X, Wang Y, Weichenthal S, Weiderpass E, Weintraub RG, Westerman R, Wilkinson JD, Woldeyohannes SM, Wong JQ, Wordofa MA, Xu G, Yang YC, Yano Y, Yentur GK, Yip P, Yonemoto N, Yoon SJ, Younis MZ, Yu C, Jin KY, El Sayed Zaki M, Zhao Y, Zheng Y, Zhou M, Zhu J, Zou XN, Lopez AD, Naghavi M, Murray CJ, Lozano R
(2014) Lancet 384: 980-1004
MeSH Terms: Age Distribution, Cause of Death, Female, Global Health, HIV Infections, Humans, Maternal Mortality, Models, Statistical, Organizational Objectives, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
BACKGROUND - The fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 5) established the goal of a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR; number of maternal deaths per 100,000 livebirths) between 1990 and 2015. We aimed to measure levels and track trends in maternal mortality, the key causes contributing to maternal death, and timing of maternal death with respect to delivery.
METHODS - We used robust statistical methods including the Cause of Death Ensemble model (CODEm) to analyse a database of data for 7065 site-years and estimate the number of maternal deaths from all causes in 188 countries between 1990 and 2013. We estimated the number of pregnancy-related deaths caused by HIV on the basis of a systematic review of the relative risk of dying during pregnancy for HIV-positive women compared with HIV-negative women. We also estimated the fraction of these deaths aggravated by pregnancy on the basis of a systematic review. To estimate the numbers of maternal deaths due to nine different causes, we identified 61 sources from a systematic review and 943 site-years of vital registration data. We also did a systematic review of reports about the timing of maternal death, identifying 142 sources to use in our analysis. We developed estimates for each country for 1990-2013 using Bayesian meta-regression. We estimated 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) for all values.
FINDINGS - 292,982 (95% UI 261,017-327,792) maternal deaths occurred in 2013, compared with 376,034 (343,483-407,574) in 1990. The global annual rate of change in the MMR was -0·3% (-1·1 to 0·6) from 1990 to 2003, and -2·7% (-3·9 to -1·5) from 2003 to 2013, with evidence of continued acceleration. MMRs reduced consistently in south, east, and southeast Asia between 1990 and 2013, but maternal deaths increased in much of sub-Saharan Africa during the 1990s. 2070 (1290-2866) maternal deaths were related to HIV in 2013, 0·4% (0·2-0·6) of the global total. MMR was highest in the oldest age groups in both 1990 and 2013. In 2013, most deaths occurred intrapartum or postpartum. Causes varied by region and between 1990 and 2013. We recorded substantial variation in the MMR by country in 2013, from 956·8 (685·1-1262·8) in South Sudan to 2·4 (1·6-3·6) in Iceland.
INTERPRETATION - Global rates of change suggest that only 16 countries will achieve the MDG 5 target by 2015. Accelerated reductions since the Millennium Declaration in 2000 coincide with increased development assistance for maternal, newborn, and child health. Setting of targets and associated interventions for after 2015 will need careful consideration of regions that are making slow progress, such as west and central Africa.
FUNDING - Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Research on vaccines during pregnancy: protocol design and assessment of safety.
Munoz FM, Sheffield JS, Beigi RH, Read JS, Swamy GK, Jevaji I, Rasmussen SA, Edwards KM, Fortner KB, Patel SM, Spong CY, Ault K, Heine RP, Nesin M
(2013) Vaccine 31: 4274-9
MeSH Terms: Clinical Trials as Topic, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Newborn, Diseases, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Research Design, Vaccination, Vaccines
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
The Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health organized a series of conferences, entitled "Enrolling Pregnant Women in Clinical Trials of Vaccines and Therapeutics", to discuss study design and the assessment of safety in clinical trials conducted in pregnant women. A panel of experts was charged with developing guiding principles for the design of clinical trials and the assessment of safety of vaccines during pregnancy. Definitions and a grading system to evaluate local and systemic reactogenicity, adverse events, and other events associated with pregnancy and delivery were developed. The purpose of this report is to provide investigators interested in vaccine research in pregnancy with a basic set of tools to design and implement maternal immunization studies which may be conducted more efficiently using consistent definitions and grading of adverse events to allow the comparison of safety reports from different trials. These guidelines and safety assessment tools may be modified to meet the needs of each particular protocol based on evidence collected as investigators use them in clinical trials in different settings and share their findings and expertise.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Research on vaccines during pregnancy: reference values for vital signs and laboratory assessments.
Sheffield JS, Munoz FM, Beigi RH, Rasmussen SA, Edwards KM, Read JS, Heine RP, Ault KA, Swamy GK, Jevaji I, Spong CY, Fortner KB, Patel SM, Nesin M
(2013) Vaccine 31: 4264-73
MeSH Terms: Blood Chemical Analysis, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Newborn, Diseases, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Reference Values, Vaccination, Vaccines
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
The Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health organized a series of conferences, "Enrolling Pregnant Women in Clinical Trials of Vaccines and Therapeutics", to discuss enrollment and safety assessments of pregnant women in clinical trials of vaccines. Experts in obstetrics, maternal-fetal medicine, infectious diseases, pediatrics, neonatology, genetics, vaccinology and clinical trial design were charged with identifying normal ranges for vital signs and laboratory assessments in pregnancy. A grading system for adverse events was then developed.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Immune system disturbances in schizophrenia.
Horváth S, Mirnics K
(2014) Biol Psychiatry 75: 316-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Brain, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Maternal Exposure, Membrane Proteins, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, RNA-Binding Proteins, Schizophrenia, Serpins, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Epidemiological, genetic, transcriptome, postmortem, peripheral biomarker, and therapeutic studies of schizophrenia all point to a dysregulation of both innate and adaptive immune systems in the disease, and it is likely that these immune changes actively contribute to disease symptoms. Gene expression disturbances in the brain of subjects with schizophrenia show complex, region-specific changes with consistently replicated and potentially interdependent induction of serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade A member 3 (SERPINA3) and interferon inducible transmembrane protein (IFITM) family transcripts in the prefrontal cortex. Recent data suggest that IFITM3 expression is a critical mediator of maternal immune activation. Because the IFITM gene family is primarily expressed in the endothelial cells and meninges, and because the meninges play a critical role in interneuron development, we suggest that these two non-neuronal cell populations might play an important role in the disease pathophysiology. Finally, we propose that IFITM3 in particular might be a novel, appealing, knowledge-based drug target for treatment of schizophrenia.
Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Effects of maternal immune activation on gene expression patterns in the fetal brain.
Garbett KA, Hsiao EY, Kálmán S, Patterson PH, Mirnics K
(2012) Transl Psychiatry 2: e98
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Child, Child Development Disorders, Pervasive, Crystallins, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Influenza, Human, Interleukin-6, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Organ Size, Placenta, Poly I-C, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, RNA, Recombinant Proteins, Risk Factors, Schizophrenia, Transcriptome, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
We are exploring the mechanisms underlying how maternal infection increases the risk for schizophrenia and autism in the offspring. Several mouse models of maternal immune activation (MIA) were used to examine the immediate effects of MIA induced by influenza virus, poly(I:C) and interleukin IL-6 on the fetal brain transcriptome. Our results indicate that all three MIA treatments lead to strong and common gene expression changes in the embryonic brain. Most notably, there is an acute and transient upregulation of the α, β and γ crystallin gene family. Furthermore, levels of crystallin gene expression are correlated with the severity of MIA as assessed by placental weight. The overall gene expression changes suggest that the response to MIA is a neuroprotective attempt by the developing brain to counteract environmental stress, but at a cost of disrupting typical neuronal differentiation and axonal growth. We propose that this cascade of events might parallel the mechanisms by which environmental insults contribute to the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
26 MeSH Terms
Influenza and tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccinations during pregnancy.
Fortner KB, Kuller JA, Rhee EJ, Edwards KM
(2012) Obstet Gynecol Surv 67: 251-7
MeSH Terms: Diphtheria-Tetanus-acellular Pertussis Vaccines, Female, Humans, Influenza Vaccines, Influenza, Human, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Whooping Cough
Show Abstract · Added May 28, 2014
UNLABELLED - Vaccinations in pregnancy are an important aspect of prenatal care and of improving not only maternal health but also neonatal outcomes. Only 2 vaccines are specifically recommended during pregnancy: influenza and tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Because influenza illness disproportionately affects pregnant women compared with other populations, annual prevention of influenza illness is recommended for all women who will be pregnant during influenza season (October to May). Influenza vaccination has been recently reported to also result in decreased febrile respiratory illnesses in the newborn, likely through passive antibody transfer. Pertussis infection rates are rising in the United States as vaccine-induced immunity wanes, with the mortality burden primarily seen in infants aged <6 months. Pertussis immunization with Tdap is now recommended for all pregnant women during the late second (>20 weeks) or third trimester with the intent to both protect the pregnant woman and provide passive antibody to the infant before vaccination at 2 months of age. Provider support for these recommendations regarding both annual influenza vaccination and postpartum Tdap vaccination during pregnancy is critical to ensuring vaccine delivery and improving both maternal and fetal health. The article reviews the epidemiology and clinical aspects of influenza and pertussis infection with particular attention to pregnancy and recommendations for vaccination in these women.
TARGET AUDIENCE - Obstetricians and gynecologists, ophthalmologists, neurologists, family physicians, emergency room physicians
LEARNING OBJECTIVES - After completing this CME activity, obstetricians and gynecologists should be better able to analyze how influenza infection disproportionally affects pregnant women. Assess how influenza vaccination improves maternal and likely neonatal outcomes. Evaluate pertussis infection and immunity in adults, and counsel pregnant women as to the benefits of Tdap vaccination, particularly for the infant.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms