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Results: 1 to 10 of 87

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BRAF molecular testing in cytopathology: Implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted therapeutics.
Bergdorf KN, Lee LA, Weiss VL
(2020) Cancer Cytopathol 128: 9-11
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Genetic Testing, Humans, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Mutation, Neoplasms, Phosphorylation, Precision Medicine, Prognosis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf
Added March 3, 2020
0 Communities
1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Precision Medicine in Pancreatic Disease-Knowledge Gaps and Research Opportunities: Summary of a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Workshop.
Lowe ME, Andersen DK, Caprioli RM, Choudhary J, Cruz-Monserrate Z, Dasyam AK, Forsmark CE, Gorelick FS, Gray JW, Haupt M, Kelly KA, Olive KP, Plevritis SK, Rappaport N, Roth HR, Steen H, Swamidass SJ, Tirkes T, Uc A, Veselkov K, Whitcomb DC, Habtezion A
(2019) Pancreas 48: 1250-1258
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Biomedical Research, Computational Biology, Datasets as Topic, Deep Learning, Humans, Metabolomics, Pancreatic Diseases, Precision Medicine, Research
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
A workshop on research gaps and opportunities for Precision Medicine in Pancreatic Disease was sponsored by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases on July 24, 2019, in Pittsburgh. The workshop included an overview lecture on precision medicine in cancer and 4 sessions: (1) general considerations for the application of bioinformatics and artificial intelligence; (2) omics, the combination of risk factors and biomarkers; (3) precision imaging; and (4) gaps, barriers, and needs to move from precision to personalized medicine for pancreatic disease. Current precision medicine approaches and tools were reviewed, and participants identified knowledge gaps and research needs that hinder bringing precision medicine to pancreatic diseases. Most critical were (a) multicenter efforts to collect large-scale patient data sets from multiple data streams in the context of environmental and social factors; (b) new information systems that can collect, annotate, and quantify data to inform disease mechanisms; (c) novel prospective clinical trial designs to test and improve therapies; and (d) a framework for measuring and assessing the value of proposed approaches to the health care system. With these advances, precision medicine can identify patients early in the course of their pancreatic disease and prevent progression to chronic or fatal illness.
0 Communities
1 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Building evidence and measuring clinical outcomes for genomic medicine.
Peterson JF, Roden DM, Orlando LA, Ramirez AH, Mensah GA, Williams MS
(2019) Lancet 394: 604-610
MeSH Terms: Diagnostic Tests, Routine, Genome, Human, Genomics, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, Patient Outcome Assessment, Precision Medicine, Standard of Care
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Human genomic sequencing has potential diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic value across a wide breadth of clinical disciplines. One barrier to widespread adoption is the paucity of evidence for improved outcomes in patients who do not already have an indication for more focused testing. In this Series paper, we review clinical outcome studies in genomic medicine and discuss the important features and key challenges to building evidence for next generation sequencing in the context of routine patient care.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Beyond the message: advantages of snapshot proteomics with single-cell mass cytometry in solid tumors.
Mistry AM, Greenplate AR, Ihrie RA, Irish JM
(2019) FEBS J 286: 1523-1539
MeSH Terms: Humans, Image Cytometry, Mass Spectrometry, Neoplasms, Precision Medicine, Proteins, Proteomics, Sensitivity and Specificity, Signal Transduction, Single-Cell Analysis, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added December 16, 2018
Single-cell technologies that can quantify features of individual cells within a tumor are critical for treatment strategies aiming to target cancer cells while sparing or activating beneficial cells. Given that key players in protein networks are often the primary targets of precision oncology strategies, it is imperative to transcend the nucleic acid message and read cellular actions in human solid tumors. Here, we review the advantages of multiplex, single-cell mass cytometry in tissue and solid tumor investigations. Mass cytometry can quantitatively probe nearly any cellular feature or target. In discussing the ability of mass cytometry to reveal and characterize a broad spectrum of cell types, identify rare cells, and study functional behavior through protein signaling networks in millions of individual cells from a tumor, this review surveys publications of scientific advances in solid tumor biology made with the aid of mass cytometry. Advances discussed include functional identification of rare tumor and tumor-infiltrating immune cells and dissection of cellular mechanisms of immunotherapy in solid tumors and the periphery. The review concludes by highlighting ways to incorporate single-cell mass cytometry in solid tumor precision oncology efforts and rapidly developing cytometry techniques for quantifying cell location and sequenced nucleic acids.
© 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.
3 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Precision HIV care: responding to old questions and meeting new challenges.
Hulgan T, Dash C, Haas DW, Phillips EJ
(2018) Pharmacogenomics 19: 1299-1302
MeSH Terms: AIDS Vaccines, Anti-Retroviral Agents, HIV, HIV Infections, Humans, Pharmacogenetics, Precision Medicine
Added December 11, 2019
0 Communities
2 Members
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MeSH Terms
Cardiac Toxicities in the Era of Precision Medicine: Underlying Risk Factors, Targeted Therapies, and Cardiac Biomarkers.
Blaes AH, Thavendiranathan P, Moslehi J
(2018) Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book 38: 764-774
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Cardiotoxicity, Humans, Precision Medicine, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added October 1, 2018
Cancer therapies can cause a variety of cardiac toxicities, including ischemia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, myocarditis, arrhythmias, vascular disease, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Addressing cardiovascular risk at baseline, before initiating therapy, during cancer treatment, and in the survivorship period is imperative. It may be useful to risk stratify individuals with cardiovascular risk factors using biomarkers or imaging before they receive potentially cardiotoxic therapies. Additionally, new guidelines recommend cardiac imaging with echocardiography in the survivorship period 6 to 12 months after completing cancer therapy for these high-risk individuals. Close collaboration between cardiology and oncology in both clinical practice and future research is essential.
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5 MeSH Terms
Identification of a gene-expression predictor for diagnosis and personalized stratification of lupus patients.
Ding Y, Li H, He X, Liao W, Yi Z, Yi J, Chen Z, Moore DJ, Yi Y, Xiang W
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0198325
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Interferons, Male, Monitoring, Physiologic, Precision Medicine, Severity of Illness Index, Signal Transduction, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added July 6, 2018
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and degrees of severity. Few genomic biomarkers for SLE have been validated and employed to inform clinical classifications and decisions. To discover and assess the gene-expression based SLE predictors in published studies, we performed a meta-analysis using our established signature database and a data similarity-driven strategy. From 13 training data sets on SLE gene-expression studies, we identified a SLE meta-signature (SLEmetaSig100) containing 100 concordant genes that are involved in DNA sensors and the IFN signaling pathway. We rigorously examined SLEmetaSig100 with both retrospective and prospective validation in two independent data sets. Using unsupervised clustering, we retrospectively elucidated that SLEmetaSig100 could classify clinical samples into two groups that correlated with SLE disease status and disease activities. More importantly, SLEmetaSig100 enabled personalized stratification demonstrating its ability to prospectively predict SLE disease at the individual patient level. To evaluate the performance of SLEmetaSig100 in predicting SLE, we predicted 1,171 testing samples to be either non-SLE or SLE with positive predictive value (97-99%), specificity (85%-84%), and sensitivity (60-84%). Our study suggests that SLEmetaSig100 has enhanced predictive value to facilitate current SLE clinical classification and provides personalized disease activity monitoring.
0 Communities
1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Stop fRETting the Target: Next-Generation RET Inhibitors Have Arrived.
Iams WT, Lovly CM
(2018) Cancer Discov 8: 797-799
MeSH Terms: Humans, Medical Oncology, Neoplasms, Precision Medicine, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ret
Show Abstract · Added September 10, 2020

©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Secondary Malignancies in the Era of High-Precision Radiation Therapy.
Balcer-Kubiczek EK, Eley JG
(2018) Crit Rev Oncog 23: 93-112
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Humans, Neoplasms, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Precision Medicine, Radiation, Ionizing, Radiotherapy, Radiotherapy Dosage, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Although modern radiation therapy delivers a localized distribution of ionizing energy that can be used to cure primary cancers for many patients, the inevitable radiation exposure to non-targeted normal tissue leads to a risk of a radiation-related new cancer. Modern therapies often produce a complex spectrum of secondary particles, both charged and uncharged, that must be considered both in their physical radiation transport throughout the patient and their potential to induce biological damage, which depends on the microscopic energy deposition from the cascade of primary, secondary, and downstream particles. This work summarizes the experimental data for relative biological effectiveness for particles associated with modern radiotherapy in light of their capacity to induce secondary malignancies in patients. A distinction is highlighted between the radiobiological experimental data and the coarser metrics used frequently in radiation protection. For critical assessment of the risks of secondary malignancies for patients undergoing radiation therapy, a detailed description of primary and secondary radiation fields is needed, though not routinely considered for individual patient treatments. Furthermore, not only the particle type, but also the microscopic dose and track structure, must be considered, which points to a demand for detailed physics models and high-performance computing strategies to model the risks.
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MeSH Terms
Interdisciplinary Models for Research and Clinical Endeavors in Genomic Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.
Musunuru K, Arora P, Cooke JP, Ferguson JF, Hershberger RE, Hickey KT, Lee JM, Lima JAC, Loscalzo J, Pereira NL, Russell MW, Shah SH, Sheikh F, Wang TJ, MacRae CA, American Heart Association Council on Genomic and Precision Medicine; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention; Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease; Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research; and Stroke Council
(2018) Circ Genom Precis Med 11: e000046
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Biomedical Research, Cardiovascular Diseases, Electronic Health Records, Genomics, Humans, Interdisciplinary Studies, Precision Medicine, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
The completion of the Human Genome Project has unleashed a wealth of human genomics information, but it remains unclear how best to implement this information for the benefit of patients. The standard approach of biomedical research, with researchers pursuing advances in knowledge in the laboratory and, separately, clinicians translating research findings into the clinic as much as decades later, will need to give way to new interdisciplinary models for research in genomic medicine. These models should include scientists and clinicians actively working as teams to study patients and populations recruited in clinical settings and communities to make genomics discoveries-through the combined efforts of data scientists, clinical researchers, epidemiologists, and basic scientists-and to rapidly apply these discoveries in the clinic for the prediction, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The highly publicized US Precision Medicine Initiative, also known as All of Us, is a large-scale program funded by the US National Institutes of Health that will energize these efforts, but several ongoing studies such as the UK Biobank Initiative; the Million Veteran Program; the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network; the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health; and the DiscovEHR collaboration are already providing exemplary models of this kind of interdisciplinary work. In this statement, we outline the opportunities and challenges in broadly implementing new interdisciplinary models in academic medical centers and community settings and bringing the promise of genomics to fruition.
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms