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Utilization of Cardiac Surveillance Tests in Survivors of Breast Cancer and Lymphoma After Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy.
Ruddy KJ, Sangaralingham LR, Van Houten H, Nowsheen S, Sandhu N, Moslehi J, Neuman H, Jemal A, Haddad TC, Blaes AH, Villarraga HR, Thompson C, Shah ND, Herrmann J
(2020) Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes 13: e005984
MeSH Terms: Administrative Claims, Healthcare, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Anthracyclines, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Breast Neoplasms, Cancer Survivors, Data Warehousing, Echocardiography, Female, Guideline Adherence, Heart Diseases, Humans, Lymphoma, Male, Middle Aged, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Predictive Value of Tests, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2020
BACKGROUND - The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and American Society of Clinical Oncology recommend consideration of the use of echocardiography 6 to 12 months after completion of anthracycline-based chemotherapy in at-risk populations. Assessment of BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) has also been suggested by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Failure Society of America for the identification of Stage A (at risk) heart failure patients. The real-world frequency of the use of these tests in patients after receipt of anthracycline therapy, however, has not been studied previously.
METHODS AND RESULTS - In this retrospective study, using administrative claims data from the OptumLabs Data Warehouse, we identified 31 447 breast cancer and lymphoma patients (age ≥18 years) who were treated with an anthracycline in the United States between January 1, 2008 and January 31, 2018. Continuous medical and pharmacy coverage was required for at least 6 months before the initial anthracycline dose and 12 months after the final dose. Only 36.1% of patients had any type of cardiac surveillance (echocardiography, BNP, or cardiac imaging) in the year following completion of anthracycline therapy (29.7% echocardiography). Surveillance rate increased from 37.5% in 2008 to 42.7% in 2018 (25.6% in 2008 to 40.5% echocardiography in 2018). Lymphoma patients had a lower likelihood of any surveillance compared with patients with breast cancer (odds ratio, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.74-0.85]; <0.001). Patients with preexisting diagnoses of coronary artery disease and arrhythmia had the highest likelihood of cardiac surveillance (odds ratio, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.39-1.69] and odds ratio, 1.42 [95% CI, 1.3-1.53]; <0.001 for both), although no single comorbidity was associated with a >50% rate of surveillance.
CONCLUSIONS - The majority of survivors of breast cancer and lymphoma who have received anthracycline-based chemotherapy do not undergo cardiac surveillance after treatment, including those with a history of cardiovascular comorbidities, such as heart failure.
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27 MeSH Terms
Spotlight: Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia.
Shah SC, Gupta S, Li D, Morgan D, Mustafa RA, Gawron AJ
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 704
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Biopsy, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 3, 2020
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13 MeSH Terms
Recognition and Initial Management of Fulminant Myocarditis: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.
Kociol RD, Cooper LT, Fang JC, Moslehi JJ, Pang PS, Sabe MA, Shah RV, Sims DB, Thiene G, Vardeny O, American Heart Association Heart Failure and Transplantation Committee of the Council on Clinical Cardiology
(2020) Circulation 141: e69-e92
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Arrhythmias, Cardiac, Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation, Female, Heart Transplantation, Humans, Multiple Organ Failure, Myocarditis, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Shock, Cardiogenic, United States
Show Abstract · Added January 15, 2020
Fulminant myocarditis (FM) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by sudden and severe diffuse cardiac inflammation often leading to death resulting from cardiogenic shock, ventricular arrhythmias, or multiorgan system failure. Historically, FM was almost exclusively diagnosed at autopsy. By definition, all patients with FM will need some form of inotropic or mechanical circulatory support to maintain end-organ perfusion until transplantation or recovery. Specific subtypes of FM may respond to immunomodulatory therapy in addition to guideline-directed medical care. Despite the increasing availability of circulatory support, orthotopic heart transplantation, and disease-specific treatments, patients with FM experience significant morbidity and mortality as a result of a delay in diagnosis and initiation of circulatory support and lack of appropriately trained specialists to manage the condition. This scientific statement outlines the resources necessary to manage the spectrum of FM, including extracorporeal life support, percutaneous and durable ventricular assist devices, transplantation capabilities, and specialists in advanced heart failure, cardiothoracic surgery, cardiac pathology, immunology, and infectious disease. Education of frontline providers who are most likely to encounter FM first is essential to increase timely access to appropriately resourced facilities, to prevent multiorgan system failure, and to tailor disease-specific therapy as early as possible in the disease process.
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11 MeSH Terms
A management algorithm for patients with intracranial pressure monitoring: the Seattle International Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Consensus Conference (SIBICC).
Hawryluk GWJ, Aguilera S, Buki A, Bulger E, Citerio G, Cooper DJ, Arrastia RD, Diringer M, Figaji A, Gao G, Geocadin R, Ghajar J, Harris O, Hoffer A, Hutchinson P, Joseph M, Kitagawa R, Manley G, Mayer S, Menon DK, Meyfroidt G, Michael DB, Oddo M, Okonkwo D, Patel M, Robertson C, Rosenfeld JV, Rubiano AM, Sahuquillo J, Servadei F, Shutter L, Stein D, Stocchetti N, Taccone FS, Timmons S, Tsai E, Ullman JS, Vespa P, Videtta W, Wright DW, Zammit C, Chesnut RM
(2019) Intensive Care Med 45: 1783-1794
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Algorithms, Brain Injuries, Traumatic, Consensus Development Conferences as Topic, Female, Humans, Intracranial Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Physiologic, Practice Guidelines as Topic
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
BACKGROUND - Management algorithms for adult severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) were omitted in later editions of the Brain Trauma Foundation's sTBI Management Guidelines, as they were not evidence-based.
METHODS - We used a Delphi-method-based consensus approach to address management of sTBI patients undergoing intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. Forty-two experienced, clinically active sTBI specialists from six continents comprised the panel. Eight surveys iterated queries and comments. An in-person meeting included whole- and small-group discussions and blinded voting. Consensus required 80% agreement. We developed heatmaps based on a traffic-light model where panelists' decision tendencies were the focus of recommendations.
RESULTS - We provide comprehensive algorithms for ICP-monitor-based adult sTBI management. Consensus established 18 interventions as fundamental and ten treatments not to be used. We provide a three-tier algorithm for treating elevated ICP. Treatments within a tier are considered empirically equivalent. Higher tiers involve higher risk therapies. Tiers 1, 2, and 3 include 10, 4, and 3 interventions, respectively. We include inter-tier considerations, and recommendations for critical neuroworsening to assist the recognition and treatment of declining patients. Novel elements include guidance for autoregulation-based ICP treatment based on MAP Challenge results, and two heatmaps to guide (1) ICP-monitor removal and (2) consideration of sedation holidays for neurological examination.
CONCLUSIONS - Our modern and comprehensive sTBI-management protocol is designed to assist clinicians managing sTBI patients monitored with ICP-monitors alone. Consensus-based (class III evidence), it provides management recommendations based on combined expert opinion. It reflects neither a standard-of-care nor a substitute for thoughtful individualized management.
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13 MeSH Terms
Nasal saline irrigation: a clinical update.
Succar EF, Turner JH, Chandra RK
(2019) Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 9: S4-S8
MeSH Terms: Chronic Disease, Humans, Hygiene, Nasal Lavage, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Rhinitis, Saline Solution, Sinusitis, Sodium Chloride
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2020
BACKGROUND - Nasal saline irrigation (NSI) plays an important role in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). It is a beneficial low-risk treatment that serves an adjunctive function in the medical and surgical management of CRS. NSI is hypothesized to function by thinning mucous, improving mucociliary clearance, decreasing edema, and reducing antigen load in the nasal and sinus cavities. Although its use in CRS is nearly universal, significant variety exists with regard to delivery volume, delivery pressure, frequency of use, duration of use, composition, and hygiene recommendations. Evidence is limited regarding the most optimal methods of NSI delivery. In addition, use of NSI has recently come under increasing scrutiny due to potential associations with cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis.
METHODS - In this review we provide a clinical update summarizing use of NSI for treatment of CRS, including current recommendations for use, and data regarding overall efficacy, available delivery devices, solution composition, and hygiene.
RESULTS - Current evidence and recommendations for nasal saline delivery methods, composition, and hygiene are presented.
CONCLUSION - The most recent consensus statements and Cochrane Review recommend the use of NSI for CRS based on a preponderance of lower level evidence. A conclusion regarding the optimal method of delivery and solution composition cannot be drawn based on the current literature.
© 2019 ARS-AAOA, LLC.
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MeSH Terms
Anticoagulation Strategies in Patients With Cancer: JACC Review Topic of the Week.
Mosarla RC, Vaduganathan M, Qamar A, Moslehi J, Piazza G, Giugliano RP
(2019) J Am Coll Cardiol 73: 1336-1349
MeSH Terms: Anticoagulants, Atrial Fibrillation, Blood Coagulation, Clinical Trials as Topic, Humans, Neoplasms, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Thromboembolism
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Patients with active cancer are at an increased risk of arterial and venous thromboembolism (VTE) and bleeding events. Historically, in patients with cancer, low molecular weight heparins have been preferred for treatment of VTE, whereas warfarin has been the standard anticoagulant for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). More recently, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been demonstrated to reduce the risk of venous and arterial thromboembolism in large randomized clinical trials of patients with VTE and AF, respectively, thus providing an attractive oral dosing option that does not require routine laboratory monitoring. In this review, we summarize available clinical trial data and guideline recommendations, and outline a practical approach to anticoagulation management of VTE and AF in cancer.
Copyright © 2019 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms
Updated Recommendations on the Diagnosis, Management, and Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria for Patients With Renal Medullary Carcinoma.
Msaouel P, Hong AL, Mullen EA, Atkins MB, Walker CL, Lee CH, Carden MA, Genovese G, Linehan WM, Rao P, Merino MJ, Grodman H, Dome JS, Fernandez CV, Geller JI, Apolo AB, Daw NC, Hodges HC, Moxey-Mims M, Wei D, Bottaro DP, Staehler M, Karam JA, Rathmell WK, Tannir NM
(2019) Clin Genitourin Cancer 17: 1-6
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Medullary, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Clinical Trials as Topic, Databases, Factual, Eligibility Determination, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Patient Selection, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prognosis
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is one of the most aggressive renal cell carcinomas. It predominantly afflicts young adults and adolescents with sickle cell trait and other sickle hemoglobinopathies, and is refractory to targeted and antiangiogenic therapies used in patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. Platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay for RMC treatment. On the basis of recent advances in the diagnosis, management, and clinical trial development for RMC, a panel of experts met in October 2017 and developed updated consensus recommendations to inform clinicians, researchers, and patients. Because RMC often aggressively recurs while patients are still recovering from nephrectomy, upfront chemotherapy should be considered for most patients, including those with localized disease. After safety and dosing information has been established in adults, phase II and III trials enrolling patients with RMC should allow patients aged 12 years and older to be accrued. Patients with the very rare unclassified renal cell carcinoma with medullary phenotype variant should be included in RMC trials. Medical providers should be aware that RMC can afflict subjects of all races, and not only those of African descent, and that the presence of sickle cell trait, or of other sickle hemoglobinopathies, can affect drug responses and toxicity.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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The safety of antibiotic skin testing in severe T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity of immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts.
Trubiano JA, Douglas AP, Goh M, Slavin MA, Phillips EJ
(2019) J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 7: 1341-1343.e1
MeSH Terms: Aged, Allergens, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Drug Hypersensitivity, Female, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Delayed, Immunocompetence, Immunocompromised Host, Male, Middle Aged, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Skin Tests, T-Lymphocytes
Added March 30, 2020
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14 MeSH Terms
Anaphylactoid Reactions After Instillation of Contrast Material Into the Urinary Tract: A Survey of Contemporary Practice Patterns and Review of the Literature.
Dai JC, Brisbane WG, Chang HC, Hsi RS, Harper JD
(2018) Urology 122: 58-63
MeSH Terms: Anaphylaxis, Contrast Media, Drug Hypersensitivity, Endoscopy, Humans, Incidence, Instillation, Drug, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Societies, Medical, Surveys and Questionnaires, Urinary Tract, Urologists, Urology
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To assess drug reactions (ADRs) encountered by practicing urologists for contrast instilled into the urinary collecting system, and to describe current practice patterns regarding contrast administration into the urinary tract for patients with known contrast allergies.
METHODS - Endourological Society members were e-mailed a web-based survey about their prior experience with contrast-related ADRs and practices for contrast administration into the urinary tract among patients with known intravenous contrast allergies. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare management patterns between patients with established allergies and those without.
RESULTS - An estimated 2300-2500 e-mails were reached, resulting in an estimated response rate of 6.3%-8%. Over 75% of respondents were fellowship trained. Average time in practice was 16 years, and respondents performed a mean of 6.7 urologic contrast studies per week. Among respondents, 32.6%, 14.7%, and 4.0% had treated at least 1 patient with a mild, moderate, or severe reaction, respectively. Contrast-related ADRs were most commonly associated with retrograde pyelogram (50%). For patients with known contrast allergies, 5.4% pursue additional work-up before administering contrast in the urinary tract. Pretreatment with antihistamine or steroids is used by 24.8% and 23.4%, respectively. When performing retrograde pyelograms for such patients, urologists are more likely to use dilute contrast (P = .003), but otherwise do not significantly alter technique.
CONCLUSION - Contrast ADRs are encountered not infrequently among practicing urologists. There is notable practice variation in the management of patients with known contrast allergies, though the overall perceived risk of contrast use in these patients is low, provided good technique is used.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Use of the thyroid imaging, reporting, and data system (TI-RADS) scoring system for the evaluation of subcentimeter thyroid nodules.
Weiss VL, Andreotti RF, Ely KA
(2018) Cancer Cytopathol 126: 518-524
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Biopsy, Fine-Needle, Data Systems, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Male, Middle Aged, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, Societies, Medical, Thyroid Gland, Thyroid Neoplasms, Thyroid Nodule, Ultrasonography, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
BACKGROUND - The American Thyroid Association (ATA) recommends fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of nodules measuring >1.5 cm with low-suspicion sonographic patterns or >1.0 cm with high/intermediate-suspicion features. Routine biopsy of nodules <1 cm is not recommended. However, despite these recommendations, subcentimeter nodules are often referred for FNA biopsy.
METHODS - This was a retrospective chart review of consecutive thyroid FNAs during an 18-month period (1157 patients, 1491 nodules, 2016-2017) to evaluate age, sex, medical history, diagnoses, and follow-up. Radiographic information was used to identify 61 subcentimeter nodules (4%) from 57 patients. Ultrasound studies were re-evaluated using criteria according to the American College of Radiology Thyroid Imaging, Reporting, and Data System (TI-RADS).
RESULTS - Reported reasons for biopsy included a larger companion nodule (44%), a personal or family history of cancer (26%), or a suspicious sonogram, including calcification and/or irregular contours (16%). FNA diagnoses included: 69% benign (42 of 61 nodules), 10% papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) (6 of 61 nodules), and 15% atypia of undetermined significance/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS) (9 of 61 nodules). Seven percent of nodules were unsatisfactory/nondiagnostic (4 of 61 nodules) compared with a 3% nondiagnostic rate for all sized nodules. Fifty-one nodules had an ultrasound available for re-review using the TI-RADS scoring system. A high TI-RADS score (4-5) was indicative of PTC in 29.4% of nodules. A low TI-RADS score (1-2) was indicative of PTC in 0% of nodules (P < .01). High and intermediate TI-RADS scores (3 and 4-5, respectively) were indicative of PTC/AUS/FLUS in 32% of nodules compared with 0% in those with low TI-RADS scores (P < .01).
CONCLUSIONS - The current results demonstrate successful use of the TI-RADS scoring system in evaluation of the risk of malignancy in subcentimeter nodules. Larger studies will be necessary to determine whether biopsy is warranted for TI-RADS high-subcentimeter nodules. Cancer Cytopathol 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society.
© 2018 American Cancer Society.
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20 MeSH Terms