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Surveillance of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia.
Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Li D
(2020) Am J Gastroenterol 115: 641-644
MeSH Terms: Cause of Death, Gastric Mucosa, Global Health, Humans, Morbidity, Patient Selection, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Assessment, Stomach Neoplasms, Survival Rate
Added March 3, 2020
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11 MeSH Terms
Spotlight: Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia.
Shah SC, Gupta S, Li D, Morgan D, Mustafa RA, Gawron AJ
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 704
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Biopsy, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 3, 2020
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13 MeSH Terms
Histologic Subtyping of Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia: Overview and Considerations for Clinical Practice.
Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Mustafa RA, Piazuelo MB
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 745-750
MeSH Terms: Biopsy, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 3, 2020
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9 MeSH Terms
Advancing the Science in Gastric Pre-Neoplasia: Study Design Considerations.
Davitkov P, Altayar O, Shah SC, Gawron AJ, Mustafa RA, Sultan S, Morgan DR
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 751-759
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Biopsy, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Humans, Incidence, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Prevalence, Research Design, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms
Added March 3, 2020
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13 MeSH Terms
AGA Technical Review on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia-Natural History and Clinical Outcomes.
Gawron AJ, Shah SC, Altayar O, Davitkov P, Morgan D, Turner K, Mustafa RA
(2020) Gastroenterology 158: 705-731.e5
MeSH Terms: Biopsy, Disease Progression, Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Metaplasia, Population Surveillance, Precancerous Conditions, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Stomach Neoplasms, United States
Added March 3, 2020
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14 MeSH Terms
Epidemiology and implications of concurrent diagnosis of eosinophilic oesophagitis and IBD based on a prospective population-based analysis.
Limketkai BN, Shah SC, Hirano I, Bellaguarda E, Colombel JF
(2019) Gut 68: 2152-2160
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Child, Child, Preschool, Comorbidity, Eosinophilic Esophagitis, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Population Surveillance, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
OBJECTIVE - Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoO) and IBD are immune-mediated diseases of the gastrointestinal tract with possible overlapping pathogenic mechanisms. Our aim was to define the epidemiology and clinical implications of concurrent EoO and IBD diagnoses.
DESIGN - We conducted a prospective cohort analysis using the Truven MarketScan database (2009-2016) to estimate the incidence and prevalence of EoO in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) or UC and vice versa. Cox proportional hazards and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate the risk of EoO-related or IBD-related complications among patients with concurrent diagnoses.
RESULTS - Among 134 013 536 individuals, the incidence of EoO, CD and UC were 23.1, 51.2 and 55.2 per 100 000 person-years, respectively. The risk of EoO was higher among patients with CD (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 5.4, p<0.01; prevalence ratio (PR) 7.8, p<0.01) or UC (IRR 3.5, p<0.01; PR 5.0, p<0.01), while the risk of IBD was higher among patients with EoO (CD: IRR 5.7, p<0.01; PR 7.6, p<0.01; UC: IRR 3.4, p<0.01; PR 4.9, p<0.01) versus individuals without either diagnosis. Concurrent diagnosis of EoO and IBD was associated with greater composite risk of IBD-related complications (CD: adjusted HR (aHR) 1.09, p=0.01; UC: aHR 1.10, p=0.04) but lower composite risk of EoO-related complications (aHR 0.59; p<0.01).
CONCLUSION - Based on a population-based prospective cohort analysis, the risk of EoO is significantly higher among patients with IBD and vice versa. Concurrent diagnoses might modify the risk of IBD-related and EoO-related complications. Studies defining the mechanisms underlying these observations are needed.
© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.
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MeSH Terms
Sex-based differences in the incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases-pooled analysis of population-based studies from the Asia-Pacific region.
Shah SC, Khalili H, Chen CY, Ahn HS, Ng SC, Burisch J, Colombel JF
(2019) Aliment Pharmacol Ther 49: 904-911
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Asia, Child, Child, Preschool, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Pacific Ocean, Population Surveillance, Risk Factors, Sex Characteristics, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND - There appear to be differences in risk factor profiles for IBD between Asia-Pacific and Western populations, which might suggest idiosyncrasies in pathogenesis. Recently, sex-based differences in IBD according to the age of diagnosis have been described in Western populations.
AIM - To identify whether sex-based differences in IBD incidence similarly exist across the age spectrum for Asia-Pacific populations.
METHODS - We identified Asia-Pacific population-based cohorts where IBD incidence data stratified by sex were available for the full age spectrum. Cohorts were included only if IBD diagnoses were confirmed and validated. We calculated incidence rate ratios of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) according to age and compared differences between males and females using random-effects meta-analysis.
RESULTS - Among 567.8 million people from 11 Asia-Pacific countries/provinces/nations, we identified 10 553 incident CD cases (7060 males; 3493 females) and 16 946 incident UC cases (9754 males; 7192 females). Starting in early adolescence until age 50 years, there was a 36%-64% higher incidence of CD in males vs females (P < 0.001). UC incidence ranged from 20%-42% higher in males vs females in the age groups between 15 and 65 years (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS - In a pooled analysis of population-based studies from the Asia-Pacific region, we found a male predominance of both CD and UC for the majority of the age spectrum from adolescence to middle/late-middle age. Additional studies are needed to clarify biological and nonbiological determinants of sex differences in IBD, which might be distinct between Asia-Pacific and Western populations.
© 2019 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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20 MeSH Terms
Statin Exposure Is Not Associated with Reduced Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Shah SC, Glass J, Giustino G, Hove JRT, Castaneda D, Torres J, Kumar A, Elman J, Ullman TA, Itzkowitz SH
(2019) Gut Liver 13: 54-61
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cholangitis, Sclerosing, Cohort Studies, Colitis, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Population Surveillance, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Background/Aims - Statins have been postulated to lower the risk of colorectal neoplasia. No studies have examined any possible chemopreventive effect of statins in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) undergoing colorectal cancer (CRC) surveillance. This study examined the association of statin exposure with dysplasia and CRC in patients with IBD undergoing dysplasia surveillance colonoscopies.
Methods - A cohort of patients with IBD undergoing colonoscopic surveillance for dysplasia and CRC at a single academic medical center were studied. The inclusion criteria were IBD involving the colon for ≥8 years (or any colitis duration if associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis [PSC]) and at least two colonoscopic surveillance exams. The exclusion criteria were CRC or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) prior to or at enrollment, prior colectomy, or limited (<30%) colonic disease. The primary outcome was the frequency of dysplasia and/or CRC in statin-exposed versus nonexposed patients.
Results - A total of 642 patients met the inclusion criteria (57 statin-exposed and 585 nonexposed). The statin-exposed group had a longer IBD duration, longer follow-up period, and more colonoscopies but lower inflammatory scores, less frequent PSC and less use of thiopurines and biologics. There were no differences in low-grade dysplasia, HGD, or CRC development during the follow-up period between the statin-exposed and nonexposed groups (21.1%, 5.3%, 1.8% vs 19.2%, 2.9%, 2.9%, respectively). Propensity score analysis did not alter the overall findings.
Conclusions - In IBD patients undergoing surveillance colonoscopies, statin use was not associated with reduced dysplasia or CRC rates. The role of statins as chemopreventive agents in IBD remains controversial.
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MeSH Terms
Multiple Introductions and Antigenic Mismatch with Vaccines May Contribute to Increased Predominance of G12P[8] Rotaviruses in the United States.
Ogden KM, Tan Y, Akopov A, Stewart LS, McHenry R, Fonnesbeck CJ, Piya B, Carter MH, Fedorova NB, Halpin RA, Shilts MH, Edwards KM, Payne DC, Esona MD, Mijatovic-Rustempasic S, Chappell JD, Patton JT, Halasa NB, Das SR
(2019) J Virol 93:
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Viral, Capsid Proteins, Child, Preschool, Genotyping Techniques, Humans, Infant, Phylogeny, Population Surveillance, Rotavirus, Rotavirus Infections, Rotavirus Vaccines, Sequence Analysis, RNA, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Rotavirus is the leading global cause of diarrheal mortality for unvaccinated children under 5 years of age. The outer capsid of rotavirus virions consists of VP7 and VP4 proteins, which determine viral G and P types, respectively, and are primary targets of neutralizing antibodies. Successful vaccination depends upon generating broadly protective immune responses following exposure to rotaviruses presenting a limited number of G- and P-type antigens. Vaccine introduction resulted in decreased rotavirus disease burden but also coincided with the emergence of uncommon G and P genotypes, including G12. To gain insight into the recent predominance of G12P[8] rotaviruses in the United States, we evaluated 142 complete rotavirus genome sequences and metadata from 151 clinical specimens collected in Nashville, TN, from 2011 to 2013 through the New Vaccine Surveillance Network. Circulating G12P[8] strains were found to share many segments with other locally circulating strains but to have distinct constellations. Phylogenetic analyses of G12 sequences and their geographic sources provided evidence for multiple separate introductions of G12 segments into Nashville, TN. Antigenic epitopes of VP7 proteins of G12P[8] strains circulating in Nashville, TN, differ markedly from those of vaccine strains. Fully vaccinated children were found to be infected with G12P[8] strains more frequently than with other rotavirus genotypes. Multiple introductions and significant antigenic mismatch may in part explain the recent predominance of G12P[8] strains in the United States and emphasize the need for continued monitoring of rotavirus vaccine efficacy against emerging rotavirus genotypes. Rotavirus is an important cause of childhood diarrheal disease worldwide. Two immunodominant proteins of rotavirus, VP7 and VP4, determine G and P genotypes, respectively. Recently, G12P[8] rotaviruses have become increasingly predominant. By analyzing rotavirus genome sequences from stool specimens obtained in Nashville, TN, from 2011 to 2013 and globally circulating rotaviruses, we found evidence of multiple introductions of G12 genes into the area. Based on sequence polymorphisms, VP7 proteins of these viruses are predicted to present themselves to the immune system very differently than those of vaccine strains. Many of the sick children with G12P[8] rotavirus in their diarrheal stools also were fully vaccinated. Our findings emphasize the need for continued monitoring of circulating rotaviruses and the effectiveness of the vaccines against strains with emerging G and P genotypes.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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13 MeSH Terms
Gene expression in triple-negative breast cancer in relation to survival.
Wang S, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Cai Q, Cai H, Guo X, Shi L, Wu J, Ye F, Qiu Q, Zheng Y, Zheng W, Bao PP, Shu XO
(2018) Breast Cancer Res Treat 171: 199-207
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Tumor, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Population Surveillance, Prognosis, Registries, Survival Analysis, Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added December 6, 2018
PURPOSE - The identification of biomarkers related to the prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critically important for improved understanding of the biology that drives TNBC progression.
METHODS - We evaluated gene expression in total RNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the NanoString nCounter assay for 469 TNBC cases from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study. We used Cox regression to quantify Hazard Ratios (HR) and corresponding confidence intervals (CI) for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in models that included adjustment for breast cancer intrinsic subtype. Of 302 genes in our discovery analysis, 22 were further evaluated in relation to OS among 134 TNBC cases from the Nashville Breast Health Study and the Southern Community Cohort Study; 16 genes were further evaluated in relation to DFS in 335 TNBC cases from four gene expression omnibus datasets. Fixed-effect meta-analysis was used to combine results across data sources.
RESULTS - Twofold higher expression of EOMES (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97), RASGRP1 (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.97), and SOD2 (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.96) was associated with better OS. Twofold higher expression of EOMES (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.97) and RASGRP1 (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.81-0.95) was also associated with better DFS. On the contrary, a doubling of FA2H (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.22) and GSPT1 (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14-1.55) expression was associated with shorter DFS.
CONCLUSIONS - We identified five genes (EOMES, FA2H, GSPT1, RASGRP1, and SOD2) that may serve as potential prognostic biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for TNBC.
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16 MeSH Terms