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Platelet Lipidomic Profiling: Novel Insight into Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α Activity and Its Role in Human Platelet Activation.
Duvernay MT, Matafonov A, Lindsley CW, Hamm HE
(2015) Biochemistry 54: 5578-88
MeSH Terms: Benzoates, Blood Platelets, Glycerophospholipids, Group IV Phospholipases A2, Humans, Lipids, Oligopeptides, Peptide Fragments, Platelet Activation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptor, PAR-1, Receptors, Thrombin, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization, Stress, Mechanical, Sulfonamides, Thrombin
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
With a newer, more selective and efficacious cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α) inhibitor available, we revisited the role of cPLA2α activity in platelet activation and discovered that a component of platelet signaling, even larger than previously appreciated, relies on this enzyme. In a whole blood shear-based flow chamber assay, giripladib, a cPLA2α inhibitor, reduced platelet adhesion and accumulation on collagen. Moreover, giripladib differentially affected P-selectin expression and GPIIbIIIa activation depending on the agonist employed. While protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated platelet activation was unaffected by giripladib, the levels of PAR4- and GPVI-mediated platelet activation were significantly reduced. Meanwhile, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist SQ29548 had no effect on PAR-, GPVI-, or puriniergic receptor-mediated platelet activation, suggesting that another eicosanoid produced downstream of arachidonic acid liberation by cPLA2α was responsible for this large component of PAR4- and GPVI-mediated platelet activation. In parallel, we profiled PAR-mediated changes in glycerophospholipid (GPL) mass with and without giripladib to better understand cPLA2α-mediated lipid metabolism. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) demonstrated the largest consumption of mass during thrombin stimulation. Additionally, we confirm phosphatidylinositol as a major substrate of cPLA2α. A comparison of PAR1- and PAR4-induced metabolism revealed the consumption of more putative arachidonyl-PE species downstream of PAR1 activation. Instead of enhanced cPLA2α activity and therefore more arachidonic acid liberation downstream of PAR4, these results indicate the major role that cPLA2α activity plays in platelet function and suggest that a novel eicosanoid is produced in response to platelet activation that represents a large component of PAR4- and GPVI-mediated responses.
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MeSH Terms
α2β1 integrin, GPVI receptor, and common FcRγ chain on mouse platelets mediate distinct responses to collagen in models of thrombosis.
Marjoram RJ, Li Z, He L, Tollefsen DM, Kunicki TJ, Dickeson SK, Santoro SA, Zutter MM
(2014) PLoS One 9: e114035
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Platelets, Collagen, Disease Models, Animal, Integrin alpha2beta1, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Platelet Activation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Rats, Receptors, IgG, Thrombosis
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Platelets express the α2β1 integrin and the glycoprotein VI (GPVI)/FcRγ complex, both collagen receptors. Understanding platelet-collagen receptor function has been enhanced through use of genetically modified mouse models. Previous studies of GPVI/FcRγ-mediated collagen-induced platelet activation were perfomed with mice in which the FcRγ subunit was genetically deleted (FcRγ-/-) or the complex was depleted. The development of α2β1-/- and GPVI-/- mice permits side-by-side comparison to address contributions of these collagen receptors in vivo and in vitro.
APPROACH AND RESULTS - To understand the different roles played by the α2β1 integrin, the GPVI receptor or FcRγ subunit in collagen-stimulated hemostasis and thrombosis, we compared α2β1-/-, FcRγ-/-, and GPVI-/- mice in models of endothelial injury and intravascular thrombosis in vivo and their platelets in collagen-stimulated activation in vitro. We demonstrate that both the α2β1 integrin and the GPVI receptor, but not the FcRγ subunit influence carotid artery occlusion in vivo. In contrast, the GPVI receptor and the FcRγ chain, but not the α2β1 integrin, play similar roles in intravascular thrombosis in response to soluble Type I collagen. FcRγ-/- platelets showed less attenuation of tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins including RhoGDI when compared to GPVI-/- and wild type platelets. The difference between FcRγ-/- and GPVI-/- platelet phosphotyrosine levels correlated with the in vivo thrombosis findings.
CONCLUSION - Our data demonstrate that genetic deletion of GPVI receptor, FcRγ chain, or the α2β1 integrin changes the thrombotic potentials of these platelets to collagen dependent on the stimulus mechanism. The data suggest that the FcRγ chain may provide a dominant negative effect through modulating signaling pathways in platelets involving several tyrosine phosphorylated proteins such as RhoGDI. In addition, these findings suggest a more complex signaling network downstream of the platelet collagen receptors than previously appreciated.
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12 MeSH Terms
12-lipoxygenase activity plays an important role in PAR4 and GPVI-mediated platelet reactivity.
Yeung J, Apopa PL, Vesci J, Stolla M, Rai G, Simeonov A, Jadhav A, Fernandez-Perez P, Maloney DJ, Boutaud O, Holman TR, Holinstat M
(2013) Thromb Haemost 110: 569-81
MeSH Terms: 12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid, Animals, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Blood Platelets, Cyclooxygenase 1, Eicosanoids, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Platelet Activation, Platelet Adhesiveness, Platelet Aggregation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Thrombin, Thrombosis, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Following initial platelet activation, arachidonic acid is metabolised by cyclooxygenase-1 and 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX). While the role of 12-LOX in the platelet is not well defined, recent evidence suggests that it may be important for regulation of platelet activity and is agonist-specific in the manner in which it regulates platelet function. Using small molecule inhibitors selective for 12-LOX and 12-LOX-deficient mice, the role of 12-LOX in regulation of human platelet activation and thrombosis was investigated. Pharmacologically inhibiting 12-LOX resulted in attenuation of platelet aggregation, selective inhibition of dense versus alpha granule secretion, and inhibition of platelet adhesion under flow for PAR4 and collagen. Additionally, 12-LOX-deficient mice showed attenuated integrin activity to PAR4-AP and convulxin compared to wild-type mice. Finally, platelet activation by PARs was shown to be differentially dependent on COX-1 and 12-LOX with PAR1 relying on COX-1 oxidation of arachidonic acid while PAR4 being more dependent on 12-LOX for normal platelet function. These studies demonstrate an important role for 12-LOX in regulating platelet activation and thrombosis. Furthermore, the data presented here provide a basis for potentially targeting 12-LOX as a means to attenuate unwanted platelet activation and clot formation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Effect of zymogen domains and active site occupation on activation of prothrombin by von Willebrand factor-binding protein.
Kroh HK, Bock PE
(2012) J Biol Chem 287: 39149-57
MeSH Terms: Binding, Competitive, Blood Coagulation, Carrier Proteins, Catalytic Domain, Enzyme Precursors, Fibrin, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Kinetics, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Prothrombin, Recombinant Proteins, Staphylococcus aureus, Thermodynamics, Thrombin, Virulence Factors, von Willebrand Factor
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Prothrombin is conformationally activated by von Willebrand factor-binding protein (vWbp) from Staphylococcus aureus through insertion of the NH(2)-terminal residues of vWbp into the prothrombin catalytic domain. The rate of prothrombin activation by vWbp(1-263) is controlled by a hysteretic kinetic mechanism initiated by substrate binding. The present study evaluates activation of prothrombin by full-length vWbp(1-474) through activity progress curve analysis. Additional interactions from the COOH-terminal half of vWbp(1-474) strengthened the initial binding of vWbp to prothrombin, resulting in higher activity and an ∼100-fold enhancement in affinity. The affinities of vWbp(1-263) or vWbp(1-474) were compared by equilibrium binding to the prothrombin derivatives prethrombin 1, prethrombin 2, thrombin, meizothrombin, and meizothrombin(des-fragment 1) and their corresponding active site-blocked analogs. Loss of fragment 1 in prethrombin 1 enhanced affinity for both vWbp(1-263) and vWbp(1-474), with a 30-45% increase in Gibbs free energy, implicating a regulatory role for fragment 1 in the activation mechanism. Active site labeling of all prothrombin derivatives with D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethyl ketone, analogous to irreversible binding of a substrate, decreased their K(D) values for vWbp into the subnanomolar range, reflecting the dependence of the activating conformational change on substrate binding. The results suggest a role for prothrombin domains in the pathophysiological activation of prothrombin by vWbp, and may reveal a function for autocatalysis of the vWbp·prothrombin complexes during initiation of blood coagulation.
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20 MeSH Terms
Unveiling the burden of influenza-associated pneumococcal pneumonia.
Grijalva CG, Griffin MR
(2012) J Infect Dis 205: 355-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bronchopneumonia, Carrier State, Female, Ferrets, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Influenza A virus, Male, Metapneumovirus, Orthomyxoviridae, Orthomyxoviridae Infections, Paramyxoviridae Infections, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Pneumococcal Infections, Pneumococcal Vaccines, Pneumonia, Pneumococcal, Pneumonia, Viral, Population Surveillance, Receptors, Cell Surface, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Streptococcus pneumoniae
Added July 27, 2018
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Structure and function of factor XI.
Emsley J, McEwan PA, Gailani D
(2010) Blood 115: 2569-77
MeSH Terms: Blood Coagulation, Blood Platelets, Catalytic Domain, Dimerization, Enzyme Activation, Evolution, Molecular, Factor IX, Factor XI, Factor XI Deficiency, Forecasting, Humans, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Prekallikrein, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Protein Interaction Mapping, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Structure-Activity Relationship
Show Abstract · Added May 19, 2014
Factor XI (FXI) is the zymogen of an enzyme (FXIa) that contributes to hemostasis by activating factor IX. Although bleeding associated with FXI deficiency is relatively mild, there has been resurgence of interest in FXI because of studies indicating it makes contributions to thrombosis and other processes associated with dysregulated coagulation. FXI is an unusual dimeric protease, with structural features that distinguish it from vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteases. The recent availability of crystal structures for zymogen FXI and the FXIa catalytic domain have enhanced our understanding of structure-function relationships for this molecule. FXI contains 4 "apple domains" that form a disk structure with extensive interfaces at the base of the catalytic domain. The characterization of the apple disk structure, and its relationship to the catalytic domain, have provided new insight into the mechanism of FXI activation, the interaction of FXIa with the substrate factor IX, and the binding of FXI to platelets. Analyses of missense mutations associated with FXI deficiency have provided additional clues to localization of ligand-binding sites on the protein surface. Together, these data will facilitate efforts to understand the physiology and pathology of this unusual protease, and development of therapeutics to treat thrombotic disorders.
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20 MeSH Terms
Suboptimal activation of protease-activated receptors enhances alpha2beta1 integrin-mediated platelet adhesion to collagen.
Marjoram RJ, Voss B, Pan Y, Dickeson SK, Zutter MM, Hamm HE, Santoro SA
(2009) J Biol Chem 284: 34640-7
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Motifs, Animals, Blood Platelets, Carrier Proteins, Collagen, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go, Humans, Integrin alpha2beta1, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Peptides, Platelet Adhesiveness, Platelet Aggregation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Rats, Receptor, PAR-1, Receptors, Collagen, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Receptors, IgG, Receptors, Thrombin, Signal Transduction, Thrombin, Type C Phospholipases
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Thrombin and fibrillar collagen are potent activators of platelets at sites of vascular injury. Both agonists cause platelet shape change, granule secretion, and aggregation to form the primary hemostatic plug. Human platelets express two thrombin receptors, protease-activated receptors 1 and 4 (PAR1 and PAR4) and two collagen receptors, the alpha(2)beta(1) integrin (alpha(2)beta(1)) and the glycoprotein VI (GPVI)/FcRgamma chain complex. Although these receptors and their signaling mechanisms have been intensely studied, it is not known whether and how these receptors cooperate in the hemostatic function of platelets. This study examined cooperation between the thrombin and collagen receptors in platelet adhesion by utilizing a collagen-related peptide (alpha2-CRP) containing the alpha(2)beta(1)-specific binding motif, GFOGER, in conjunction with PAR-activating peptides. We demonstrate that platelet adhesion to alpha2-CRP is substantially enhanced by suboptimal PAR activation (agonist concentrations that do not stimulate platelet aggregation) using the PAR4 agonist peptide and thrombin. The enhanced adhesion induced by suboptimal PAR4 activation was alpha(2)beta(1)-dependent and GPVI/FcRgamma-independent as revealed in experiments with alpha(2)beta(1)- or FcRgamma-deficient mouse platelets. We further show that suboptimal activation of other platelet G(q)-linked G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) produces enhanced platelet adhesion to alpha2-CRP. The enhanced alpha(2)beta(1)-mediated platelet adhesion is controlled by phospholipase C (PLC), but is not dependent on granule secretion, activation of alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin, or on phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate a platelet priming mechanism initiated by suboptimal activation of PAR4 or other platelet G(q)-linked GPCRs through a PLC-dependent signaling cascade that promotes enhanced alpha(2)beta(1) binding to collagens containing GFOGER sites.
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23 MeSH Terms
Negative regulation of activated alpha-2 integrins during thrombopoiesis.
Zou Z, Schmaier AA, Cheng L, Mericko P, Dickeson SK, Stricker TP, Santoro SA, Kahn ML
(2009) Blood 113: 6428-39
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Cells, Bone Marrow Cells, Cell Adhesion, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Collagen, Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Integrin alpha2, Integrin beta1, Leukemia, Basophilic, Acute, Liver, Megakaryocytes, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Point Mutation, Protein Binding, Radiation Chimera, Rats, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Thrombopoiesis
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Circulating platelets exhibit rapid signaling and adhesive responses to collagen that facilitate hemostasis at sites of vessel injury. Because platelets are anuclear, their collagen receptors must be expressed by megakaryocytes, platelet precursors that arise in the collagen-rich environment of the bone marrow. Whether and how megakaryocytes regulate collagen adhesion during their development in the bone marrow are unknown. We find that surface expression of activated, but not wild-type, alpha2 integrins in hematopoietic cells in vivo results in the generation of platelets that lack surface alpha2 receptors. Culture of hematopoietic progenitor cells ex vivo reveals that surface levels of activated, but not wild-type, alpha2 integrin receptors are rapidly down-regulated during cell growth on collagen but reach wild-type levels when cells are grown in the absence of collagen. Progenitor cells that express activated alpha2 integrins are normally distributed in the bone marrow in vivo and exhibit normal migration across a collagen-coated membrane ex vivo. This migration is accompanied by rapid down-regulation of activated surface integrins. These studies identify ligand-dependent removal of activated alpha2 receptors from the cell surface as a mechanism by which integrin function can be negatively regulated in hematopoietic cells during migration between the adhesive environment of the bone marrow and the nonadhesive environment of the circulating blood.
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25 MeSH Terms
Rap1b is critical for glycoprotein VI-mediated but not ADP receptor-mediated alpha2beta1 activation.
Wang Z, Holly SP, Larson MK, Liu J, Yuan W, Chrzanowska-Wodnicka M, White GC, Parise LV
(2009) J Thromb Haemost 7: 693-700
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Platelets, Cell Shape, Collagen, Integrin alpha2beta1, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Platelet Adhesiveness, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Purinergic P2, Signal Transduction, rap GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2010
BACKGROUND - The platelet alpha2beta1 integrin functions as both an adhesion and signaling receptor upon exposure to collagen. Recent studies have indicated that alpha2beta1 function can be activated via inside-out signaling, similar to the prototypical platelet integrin alphaIIbbeta3. However, signaling molecules that regulate alpha2beta1 activation in platelets are not well defined. A strong candidate molecule is the small GTPase Rap1b, the dominant platelet isoform of Rap1, which regulates alphaIIbbeta3 activation.
OBJECTIVES - We hypothesized that Rap1b positively regulates alpha2beta1 during agonist-induced platelet activation.
METHODS - To test whether Rap1b activates alpha2beta1 downstream of glycoprotein (GP)VI or other platelet receptors, we stimulated platelets purified from Rap1b-/- or wild-type mice with diverse agonists and measured alpha2beta1 activation using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled monomeric collagen. We also examined the role of Rap1b in outside-in signaling pathways by analyzing adhesion and spreading of Rap1b-/- or wild-type platelets on monomeric, immobilized collagen. Finally, we monitored the activation status of related Rap GTPases to detect changes in signaling pathways potentially associated with Rap1b-mediated events.
RESULTS - Rap1b-/- platelets displayed comparable ADP-induced or thrombin-induced alpha2beta1 activation as wild-type platelets, but reduced convulxin-dependent alpha2beta1 activation. Rap1b-/- platelets exhibited increased spreading on immobilized collagen but similar adhesion to immobilized collagen compared to wild-type platelets. Rap1b-/- platelets also showed Rap1a and Rap2 activation upon agonist stimulation, possibly revealing functional compensation among Rap family members.
CONCLUSIONS - Rap1b is required for maximal GPVI-induced but not ADP-induced activation of alpha2beta1 in murine platelets.
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12 MeSH Terms
GPVI and alpha2beta1 play independent critical roles during platelet adhesion and aggregate formation to collagen under flow.
Sarratt KL, Chen H, Zutter MM, Santoro SA, Hammer DA, Kahn ML
(2005) Blood 106: 1268-77
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Blood Coagulation, Collagen, Humans, Integrin alpha2beta1, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Mice, Knockout, Perfusion, Phosphoproteins, Platelet Adhesiveness, Platelet Aggregation, Platelet Membrane Glycoproteins, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added February 16, 2014
The roles of the 2 major platelet-collagen receptors, glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and integrin alpha2beta1, have been intensely investigated using a variety of methods over the past decade. In the present study, we have used pharmacologic and genetic approaches to study human and mouse platelet adhesion to collagen under flow conditions. Our studies demonstrate that both GPVI and integrin alpha2beta1 play significant roles for platelet adhesion to collagen under flow and that the loss of both receptors completely ablates this response. Intracellular signaling mediated by the cytoplasmic adaptor Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) but not by the transmembrane adaptor linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is critical for platelet adhesion to collagen under flow. In addition, reduced GPVI receptor density results in severe defects in platelet adhesion to collagen under flow. Defective adhesion to collagen under flow is associated with prolonged tail-bleeding times in mice lacking one or both collagen receptors. These studies establish platelet-collagen responses under physiologic flow as the consequence of a close partnership between 2 structurally distinct receptors and suggest that both receptors play significant hemostatic roles in vivo.
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16 MeSH Terms