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Lipopolysaccharide Induced Opening of the Blood Brain Barrier on Aging 5XFAD Mouse Model.
Barton SM, Janve VA, McClure R, Anderson A, Matsubara JA, Gore JC, Pham W
(2019) J Alzheimers Dis 67: 503-513
MeSH Terms: Aging, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Animals, Benzothiazoles, Biological Availability, Blood-Brain Barrier, Ferric Compounds, Humans, Inflammation, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Nanoparticles, Permeability, Plaque, Amyloid
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The development of neurotherapeutics for many neurodegenerative diseases has largely been hindered by limited pharmacologic penetration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Previous attempts to target and clear amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, a key mediator of neurodegenerative changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD), have had limited clinical success due to low bioavailability in the brain because of the BBB. Here we test the effects of inducing an inflammatory response to disrupt the BBB in the 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of AD. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a bacterial endotoxin recognized by the innate immune system, was injected at varying doses. 24 hours later, mice were injected with either thioflavin S, a fluorescent Aβ-binding small molecule or 30 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, both of which are unable to penetrate the BBB under normal physiologic conditions. Our results showed that when pretreated with 3.0 mg/kg LPS, thioflavin S can be found in the brain bound to Aβ plaques in aged 5XFAD transgenic mice. Following the same LPS pretreatment, SPIO nanoparticles could also be found in the brain. However, when done on wild type or young 5XFAD mice, limited SPIO was detected. Our results suggest that the BBB in aged 5XFAD mouse model is susceptible to increased permeability mediated by LPS, allowing for improved delivery of the small molecule thioflavin S to target Aβ plaques and SPIO nanoparticles, which are significantly larger than antibodies used in clinical trials for immunotherapy of AD. Although this approach demonstrated efficacy for improved delivery to the brain, LPS treatment resulted in significant weight loss even at low doses, resulting from the induced inflammatory response. These findings suggest inducing inflammation can improve delivery of small and large materials to the brain for improved therapeutic or diagnostic efficacy. However, this approach must be balanced with the risks of systemic inflammation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Sex-Specific Association of Apolipoprotein E With Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Tau.
Hohman TJ, Dumitrescu L, Barnes LL, Thambisetty M, Beecham G, Kunkle B, Gifford KA, Bush WS, Chibnik LB, Mukherjee S, De Jager PL, Kukull W, Crane PK, Resnick SM, Keene CD, Montine TJ, Schellenberg GD, Haines JL, Zetterberg H, Blennow K, Larson EB, Johnson SC, Albert M, Bennett DA, Schneider JA, Jefferson AL, Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium and the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative
(2018) JAMA Neurol 75: 989-998
MeSH Terms: Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Apolipoproteins E, Cohort Studies, Female, Genotype, Humans, Male, Neurofibrillary Tangles, Peptide Fragments, Phosphoproteins, Plaque, Amyloid, Sex Factors, tau Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Importance - The strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD), the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene, has a stronger association among women compared with men. Yet limited work has evaluated the association between APOE alleles and markers of AD neuropathology in a sex-specific manner.
Objective - To evaluate sex differences in the association between APOE and markers of AD neuropathology measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during life or in brain tissue at autopsy.
Design, Setting, and Participants - This multicohort study selected data from 10 longitudinal cohort studies of normal aging and AD. Cohorts had variable recruitment criteria and follow-up intervals and included population-based and clinic-based samples. Inclusion in our analysis required APOE genotype data and either CSF data available for analysis. Analyses began on November 6, 2017, and were completed on December 20, 2017.
Main Outcomes and Measures - Biomarker analyses included levels of β-amyloid 42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau measured in CSF. Autopsy analyses included Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease staging for neuritic plaques and Braak staging for neurofibrillary tangles.
Results - Of the 1798 patients in the CSF biomarker cohort, 862 were women, 226 had AD, 1690 were white, and the mean (SD) age was 70 [9] years. Of the 5109 patients in the autopsy cohort, 2813 were women, 4953 were white, and the mean (SD) age was 84 (9) years. After correcting for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni procedure, we observed a statistically significant interaction between APOE-ε4 and sex on CSF total tau (β = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.27-0.55; P < .001) and phosphorylated tau (β = 0.24; 95% CI, 0.09-0.38; P = .001), whereby APOE showed a stronger association among women compared with men. Post hoc analyses suggested this sex difference was present in amyloid-positive individuals (β = 0.41; 95% CI, 0.20-0.62; P < .001) but not among amyloid-negative individuals (β = 0.06; 95% CI, -0.18 to 0.31; P = .62). We did not observe sex differences in the association between APOE and β-amyloid 42, neuritic plaque burden, or neurofibrillary tangle burden.
Conclusions and Relevance - We provide robust evidence of a stronger association between APOE-ε4 and CSF tau levels among women compared with men across multiple independent data sets. Interestingly, APOE-ε4 is not differentially associated with autopsy measures of neurofibrillary tangles. Together, the sex difference in the association between APOE and CSF measures of tau and the lack of a sex difference in the association with neurofibrillary tangles at autopsy suggest that APOE may modulate risk for neurodegeneration in a sex-specific manner, particularly in the presence of amyloidosis.
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15 MeSH Terms
A Mutual Self- and Informant-Report of Cognitive Complaint Correlates with Neuropathological Outcomes in Mild Cognitive Impairment.
Gifford KA, Liu D, Hohman TJ, Xu M, Han X, Romano RR, Fritzsche LR, Abel T, Jefferson AL
(2015) PLoS One 10: e0141831
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aging, Alzheimer Disease, Apolipoprotein E4, Autopsy, Brain, Cognition, Cognitive Dysfunction, Female, Humans, Male, Nervous System Diseases, Neurofibrillary Tangles, Neuropsychological Tests, Plaque, Amyloid
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
BACKGROUND - This study examines whether different sources of cognitive complaint (i.e., self and informant) predict Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology in elders with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).
METHODS - Data were drawn from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform and Neuropathology Datasets (observational studies) for participants with a clinical diagnosis of MCI and postmortem examination (n = 1843, 74±8 years, 52% female). Cognitive complaint (0.9±0.5 years prior to autopsy) was classified into four mutually exclusive groups: no complaint, self-only, informant-only, or mutual (both self and informant) complaint. Postmortem neuropathological outcomes included amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Proportional odds regression related complaint to neuropathology, adjusting for age, sex, race, education, depressed mood, cognition, APOE4 status, and last clinical visit to death interval.
RESULTS - Mutual complaint related to increased likelihood of meeting NIA/Reagan Institute (OR = 6.58, p = 0.004) and Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease criteria (OR = 5.82, p = 0.03), and increased neurofibrillary tangles (OR = 3.70, p = 0.03), neuritic plaques (OR = 3.52, p = 0.03), and diffuse plaques (OR = 4.35, p = 0.02). Informant-only and self-only complaint was not associated with any neuropathological outcome (all p-values>0.12).
CONCLUSIONS - In MCI, mutual cognitive complaint relates to AD pathology whereas self-only or informant-only complaint shows no relation to pathology. Findings support cognitive complaint as a marker of unhealthy brain aging and highlight the importance of obtaining informant corroboration to increase confidence of underlying pathological processes.
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16 MeSH Terms
Inhalable curcumin: offering the potential for translation to imaging and treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
McClure R, Yanagisawa D, Stec D, Abdollahian D, Koktysh D, Xhillari D, Jaeger R, Stanwood G, Chekmenev E, Tooyama I, Gore JC, Pham W
(2015) J Alzheimers Dis 44: 283-95
MeSH Terms: Administration, Inhalation, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal, Brain, Curcumin, Diagnostic Imaging, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Plaque, Amyloid, Presenilin-1, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Curcumin is a promising compound that can be used as a theranostic agent to aid research in Alzheimer's disease. Beyond its ability to bind to amyloid plaques, the compound can also cross the blood-brain barrier. Presently, curcumin can be applied only to animal models, as the formulation needed for iv injection renders it unfit for human use. Here, we describe a novel technique to aerosolize a curcumin derivative, FMeC1, and facilitate its safe delivery to the brain. Aside from the translational applicability of this approach, a study in the 5XFAD mouse model suggested that inhalation exposure to an aerosolized FMeC1 modestly improved the distribution of the compound in the brain. Additionally, immunohistochemistry data confirms that following aerosol delivery, FMeC1 binds amyloid plaques expressed in the hippocampal areas and cortex.
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17 MeSH Terms
Interactions between GSK3β and amyloid genes explain variance in amyloid burden.
Hohman TJ, Koran ME, Thornton-Wells TA, Alzheimer's Neuroimaging Initiative
(2014) Neurobiol Aging 35: 460-5
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta, Humans, Linear Models, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Amyloid, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk, tau Proteins
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2014
The driving theoretical framework of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been built around the amyloid-β (Aβ) cascade in which amyloid pathology precedes and drives tau pathology. Other evidence has suggested that tau and amyloid pathology may arise independently. Both lines of research suggest that there may be epistatic relationships between genes involved in amyloid and tau pathophysiology. In the current study, we hypothesized that genes coding glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and comparable tau kinases would modify genetic risk for amyloid plaque pathology. Quantitative amyloid positron emission tomography data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative served as the quantitative outcome in regression analyses, covarying for age, gender, and diagnosis. Three interactions reached statistical significance, all involving the GSK3β single nucleotide polymorphism rs334543-2 with APBB2 (rs2585590, rs3098914) and 1 with APP (rs457581). These interactions explained 1.2%, 1.5%, and 1.5% of the variance in amyloid deposition respectively. Our results add to a growing literature on the role of GSK-3 activity in amyloid processing and suggest that combined variation in GSK3β and APP-related genes may result in increased amyloid burden.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Ultrastructural studies in APP/PS1 mice expressing human ApoE isoforms: implications for Alzheimer's disease.
Dikranian K, Kim J, Stewart FR, Levy MA, Holtzman DM
(2012) Int J Clin Exp Pathol 5: 482-95
MeSH Terms: Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Amyloidosis, Animals, Apolipoproteins E, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Mutation, Neurons, Plaque, Amyloid, Presenilin-1, Protein Isoforms
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
Alzheimer's disease is characterized in part by extracellular aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide in the form of diffuse and fibrillar plaques in the brain. Electron microscopy (EM) has made an important contribution in understanding of the structure of amyloid plaques in humans. Classical EM studies have revealed the architecture of the fibrillar core, characterized the progression of neuritic changes, and have identified the neurofibrillary tangles formed by paired helical filaments (PHF) in degenerating neurons. Clinical data has strongly correlated cognitive impairment in AD with the substantial synapse loss observed in these early ultrastructural studies. Animal models of AD-type brain amyloidosis have provided excellent opportunities to study amyloid and neuritic pathology in detail and establish the role of neurons and glia in plaque formation. Transgenic mice overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP) alone with or without mutant presenilin 1 (PS1), have shown that brain amyloid plaque development and structure grossly recapitulate classical findings in humans. Transgenic APP/PS1 mice expressing human apolioprotein E isoforms also develop amyloid plaque deposition. However no ultrastructural data has been reported for these animals. Here we show results from detailed EM analysis of amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice expressing human isoforms of ApoE and compare these findings with EM data in other transgenic models and in human AD. Our results show that similar to other transgenic animals, APP/PS1 mice expressing human ApoE isoforms share all major cellular and subcellular degenerative features and highlight the identity of the cellular elements involved in Aβ deposition and neuronal degeneration.
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18 MeSH Terms
Fiber diffraction data indicate a hollow core for the Alzheimer's aβ 3-fold symmetric fibril.
McDonald M, Box H, Bian W, Kendall A, Tycko R, Stubbs G
(2012) J Mol Biol 423: 454-61
MeSH Terms: Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Peptides, Humans, Models, Molecular, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Peptide Fragments, Plaque, Amyloid, Protein Conformation, X-Ray Diffraction
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Amyloid β protein (Aβ), the principal component of the extracellular plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, forms fibrils well suited to structural study by X-ray fiber diffraction. Fiber diffraction patterns from the 40-residue form Aβ(1-40) confirm a number of features of a 3-fold symmetric Aβ model from solid-state NMR (ssNMR) but suggest that the fibrils have a hollow core not present in the original ssNMR models. Diffraction patterns calculated from a revised 3-fold hollow model with a more regular β-sheet structure are in much better agreement with the observed diffraction data than patterns calculated from the original ssNMR model. Refinement of a hollow-core model against ssNMR data led to a revised ssNMR model, similar to the fiber diffraction model.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Islet amyloid polypeptide, islet amyloid, and diabetes mellitus.
Westermark P, Andersson A, Westermark GT
(2011) Physiol Rev 91: 795-826
MeSH Terms: Amyloid, Animals, Autophagy, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islet Amyloid Polypeptide, Islets of Langerhans, Islets of Langerhans Transplantation, Pancreas, Plaque, Amyloid, Protein Folding, Receptors, Islet Amyloid Polypeptide, Secretory Vesicles, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added June 6, 2017
Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin) is one of the major secretory products of β-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. It is a regulatory peptide with putative function both locally in the islets, where it inhibits insulin and glucagon secretion, and at distant targets. It has binding sites in the brain, possibly contributing also to satiety regulation and inhibits gastric emptying. Effects on several other organs have also been described. IAPP was discovered through its ability to aggregate into pancreatic islet amyloid deposits, which are seen particularly in association with type 2 diabetes in humans and with diabetes in a few other mammalian species, especially monkeys and cats. Aggregated IAPP has cytotoxic properties and is believed to be of critical importance for the loss of β-cells in type 2 diabetes and also in pancreatic islets transplanted into individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review deals both with physiological aspects of IAPP and with the pathophysiological role of aggregated forms of IAPP, including mechanisms whereby human IAPP forms toxic aggregates and amyloid fibrils.
1 Communities
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18 MeSH Terms
Antioxidants and cognitive training interact to affect oxidative stress and memory in APP/PSEN1 mice.
Harrison FE, Allard J, Bixler R, Usoh C, Li L, May JM, McDonald MP
(2009) Nutr Neurosci 12: 203-18
MeSH Terms: Aging, Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Antioxidants, Ascorbic Acid, Behavior, Animal, Brain Chemistry, Cognition, Diet, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Liver, Male, Memory, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Oxidative Stress, Plaque, Amyloid, Presenilin-1, Vitamin E
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The present study investigated the relationships among oxidative stress, beta-amyloid and cognitive abilities in the APP/PSEN1 double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In two experiments, long-term dietary supplements were given to aged APP/PSEN1 mice containing vitamin C alone (1 g/kg diet; Experiment 1) or in combination with a high (750 IU/kg diet, Experiments 1 and 2) or lower (400 IU/kg diet, Experiment 2) dose of vitamin E. Oxidative stress, measured by F(4)-neuroprostanes or malondialdehyde, was elevated in cortex of control-fed APP/PSEN1 mice and reduced to wild-type levels by vitamin supplementation. High-dose vitamin E with C was less effective at reducing oxidative stress than vitamin C alone or the low vitamin E+C diet combination. The high-dose combination also impaired water maze performance in mice of both genotypes. In Experiment 2, the lower vitamin E+C treatment attenuated spatial memory deficits in APP/PSEN1 mice and improved performance in wild-type mice in the water maze. Amyloid deposition was not reduced by antioxidant supplementation in either experiment.
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22 MeSH Terms
Elimination of GD3 synthase improves memory and reduces amyloid-beta plaque load in transgenic mice.
Bernardo A, Harrison FE, McCord M, Zhao J, Bruchey A, Davies SS, Jackson Roberts L, Mathews PM, Matsuoka Y, Ariga T, Yu RK, Thompson R, McDonald MP
(2009) Neurobiol Aging 30: 1777-91
MeSH Terms: Alzheimer Disease, Amyloid, Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor, Animals, CD11b Antigen, Cells, Cultured, Cerebral Cortex, Disease Models, Animal, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry, Humans, Lipid Peroxidation, Maze Learning, Memory, Memory Disorders, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mutation, Neurons, Plaque, Amyloid, Presenilin-1, Protein Binding, Sialyltransferases
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Gangliosides have been shown to be necessary for beta-amyloid (Abeta) binding and aggregation. GD3 synthase (GD3S) is responsible for biosynthesis of the b- and c-series gangliosides, including two of the four major brain gangliosides. We examined Abeta-ganglioside interactions in neural tissue from mice lacking the gene coding for GD3S (St8sia1), and in a double-transgenic (APP/PSEN1) mouse model of Alzheimer's disease cross-bred with GD3S-/- mice. In primary neurons and astrocytes lacking GD3S, Abeta-induced cell death and Abeta aggregation were inhibited. Like GD3S-/- and APP/PSEN1 double-transgenic mice, APP/PSEN1/GD3S-/- "triple-mutant" mice are indistinguishable from wild-type mice on casual examination. APP/PSEN1 double-transgenics exhibit robust impairments on a number of reference-memory tasks. In contrast, APP/PSEN1/GD3S-/- triple-mutant mice performed as well as wild-type control and GD3S-/- mice. Consistent with the behavioral improvements, both aggregated and unaggregated Abeta and associated neuropathology were almost completely eliminated in triple-mutant mice. These results suggest that GD3 synthase may be a novel therapeutic target to combat the cognitive deficits, amyloid plaque formation, and neurodegeneration that afflict Alzheimer's patients.
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22 MeSH Terms