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FEMA GRAS assessment of natural flavor complexes: Cinnamomum and Myroxylon-derived flavoring ingredients.
Rietjens IMCM, Cohen SM, Eisenbrand G, Fukushima S, Gooderham NJ, Guengerich FP, Hecht SS, Rosol TJ, Davidsen JM, Harman CL, Murray IJ, Taylor SV
(2020) Food Chem Toxicol 135: 110949
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Cinnamomum, Consumer Product Safety, Flavoring Agents, Humans, Myroxylon, No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level, Oils, Volatile, Plant Extracts, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
In 2015, the Expert Panel of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA) initiated a program for the re-evaluation of the safety of over 250 natural flavor complexes (NFCs) used as flavor ingredients. This publication, third in the series, considers NFCs composed primarily of constituents with the 3-phenyl-2-propenyl or a cinnamyl functional group, using the procedure outlined in 2005 and updated in 2018 to evaluate the safety of naturally-occurring mixtures for their intended use as flavor ingredients. The procedure relies on a complete chemical characterization of the NFC intended for commerce and organization of each NFC's chemical constituents into well-defined congeneric groups. The safety of the NFC is evaluated using the well-established and conservative threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) concept in addition to data on absorption, metabolism and toxicology of members of the congeneric groups and the NFC under evaluation. Six NFCs from the Myroxylon and Cinnamomum genera, Balsam Oil, Peru (FEMA 2117), Tolu Balsam Extract (FEMA 3069), Cassia Bark Extract (FEMA 2257), Cassia Bark Oil (FEMA 2258), Cinnamon Bark Extract (FEMA 2290) and Cinnamon Bark Oil (FEMA 2291) were evaluated and affirmed as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) under their conditions of intended use as flavor ingredients.
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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FEMA GRAS assessment of natural flavor complexes: Mint, buchu, dill and caraway derived flavoring ingredients.
Cohen SM, Eisenbrand G, Fukushima S, Gooderham NJ, Guengerich FP, Hecht SS, Rietjens IMCM, Bastaki M, Davidsen JM, Harman CL, McGowen MM, Taylor SV
(2020) Food Chem Toxicol 135: 110870
MeSH Terms: Biological Products, Flavoring Agents, Plant Extracts, Plants, United States, United States Food and Drug Administration
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
In 2015, the Expert Panel of the Flavor and Extract Manufacturers Association (FEMA) initiated a re-evaluation of the safety of over 250 natural flavor complexes (NFCs) used as flavor ingredients. NFC flavor materials include a variety of essential oils and botanical extracts. The re-evaluation of NFCs is conducted based on a constituent-based procedure outlined in 2005 and updated in 2018 that evaluates the safety of NFCs for their intended use as flavor ingredients. This procedure is applied in the re-evaluation of the generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status of NFCs with constituent profiles that are dominated by alicyclic ketones such as menthone and carvone, secondary alcohols such as menthol and carveol, and related compounds. The FEMA Expert Panel affirmed the GRAS status of Peppermint Oil (FEMA 2848), Spearmint Oil (FEMA 3032), Spearmint Extract (FEMA 3031), Cornmint Oil (FEMA 4219), Erospicata Oil (FEMA 4777), Curly Mint Oil (FEMA 4778), Pennyroyal Oil (FEMA 2839), Buchu Leaves Oil (FEMA 2169), Caraway Oil (FEMA 2238) and Dill Oil (FEMA 2383) and determined FEMA GRAS status for Buchu Leaves Extract (FEMA 4923), Peppermint Oil, Terpeneless (FEMA 4924) and Spearmint Oil, Terpeneless (FEMA 4925).
Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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Preoperative Belladonna and Opium Suppository for Ureteral Stent Pain: A Randomized, Double-blinded, Placebo-controlled Study.
Lee FC, Holt SK, Hsi RS, Haynes BM, Harper JD
(2017) Urology 100: 27-32
MeSH Terms: Adjuvants, Anesthesia, Adult, Aged, Analgesics, Opioid, Atropa belladonna, Atropine, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Opium, Pain, Postoperative, Parasympatholytics, Phytotherapy, Plant Extracts, Preoperative Care, Prospective Studies, Quality of Life, Scopolamine, Stents, Suppositories, Ureteroscopy, Urinary Calculi
Show Abstract · Added January 16, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To investigate whether the use of a belladonna and opium (B&O) rectal suppository administered immediately before ureteroscopy (URS) and stent placement could reduce stent-related discomfort.
METHODS - A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study was performed from August 2013 to December 2014. Seventy-one subjects were enrolled and randomized to receive a B&O (15 mg/30 mg) or a placebo suppository after induction of general anesthesia immediately before URS and stent placement. Baseline urinary symptoms were assessed using the American Urological Association Symptom Score (AUASS). The Ureteral Stent Symptom Questionnaire and AUASS were completed on postoperative days (POD) 1, 3, and after stent removal. Analgesic use intraoperatively, in the recovery unit, and at home was recorded.
RESULTS - Of the 71 subjects, 65 had treatment for ureteral (41%) and renal (61%) calculi, 4 for renal urothelial carcinoma, and 2 were excluded for no stent placed. By POD3, the B&O group reported a higher mean global quality of life (QOL) score (P = .04), a better mean quality of work score (P = .05), and less pain with urination (P = .03). The B&O group reported an improved AUASS QOL when comparing POD1 with post-stent removal (P = .04). There was no difference in analgesic use among groups (P = .67). There were no episodes of urinary retention. Age was associated with unplanned emergency visits (P <.00) and "high-pain" measure (P = .02) CONCLUSION: B&O suppository administered preoperatively improved QOL measures and reduced urinary-related pain after URS with stent. Younger age was associated with severe stent pain and unplanned hospital visits.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms
A peptide immunization approach to counteract a Staphylococcus aureus protease defense against host immunity.
Jordan RE, Fernandez J, Brezski RJ, Greenplate AR, Knight DM, Raju TS, Lynch AS
(2016) Immunol Lett 172: 29-39
MeSH Terms: Abscess, Animals, Bacterial Load, Disease Models, Animal, Drug Combinations, Freund's Adjuvant, Hemocyanins, Humans, Immune Evasion, Immunity, Humoral, Immunization, Immunoglobulin G, Peptide Fragments, Plant Extracts, Proteolysis, Rabbits, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2016
Pathogens that induce acute and chronic infections, as well as certain cancers, employ numerous strategies to thwart host cellular and humoral immune defenses. One proposed evasion mechanism against humoral immunity is a localized expression of extracellular proteases that cleave the IgG hinge and disable host IgG functions. Host immunity appears to be prepared to counter such a proteolytic tactic by providing a group of autoantibodies, denoted anti-hinge antibodies that specifically bind to cleaved IgGs and provide compensating functional restoration in vitro. These respective counter-measures highlight the complex interrelationships among pathogens and host immunity and suggested to us a possible means for therapeutic intervention. In this study, we combined an investigation of pathogen-mediated proteolysis of host IgGs with an immunization strategy to boost host anti-hinge antibodies. In a Staphylococcus aureus infection model using an artificial tissue cage (wiffle ball) implanted into rabbits, cleaved rabbit IgGs were detected in abundance in the abscesses of untreated animals early after infection. However, in animals previously immunized with peptide analogs of the cleaved IgG hinge to generate substantial anti-hinge antibody titers, S. aureus colony formation was markedly reduced compared to control animals or those similarly immunized with a scrambled peptide sequence. The results of this study demonstrate that extensive local proteolysis of IgGs occurs in a test abscess setting and that immunization to increase host anti-hinge antibodies provided substantial acute protection against bacterial growth.
Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Degradation of Curcumin: From Mechanism to Biological Implications.
Schneider C, Gordon ON, Edwards RL, Luis PB
(2015) J Agric Food Chem 63: 7606-14
MeSH Terms: Animals, Curcuma, Curcumin, Humans, Molecular Structure, Plant Extracts
Show Abstract · Added October 9, 2015
Curcumin is the main bioactive ingredient in turmeric extract and widely consumed as part of the spice mix curry or as a dietary supplement. Turmeric has a long history of therapeutic application in traditional Asian medicine. Biomedical studies conducted in the past two decades have identified a large number of cellular targets and effects of curcumin. In vitro curcumin rapidly degrades in an autoxidative transformation to diverse chemical species, the formation of which has only recently been appreciated. This paper discusses how the degradation and metabolism of curcumin, through products and their mechanism of formation, provide a basis for the interpretation of preclinical data and clinical studies. It is suggested that the previously unrecognized diversity of its degradation products could be an important factor in explaining the polypharmacology of curcumin.
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6 MeSH Terms
Oxidative Transformation of Demethoxy- and Bisdemethoxycurcumin: Products, Mechanism of Formation, and Poisoning of Human Topoisomerase IIα.
Gordon ON, Luis PB, Ashley RE, Osheroff N, Schneider C
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 989-96
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Neoplasm, Curcuma, Curcumin, DNA Cleavage, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA-Binding Proteins, Diarylheptanoids, Epoxy Compounds, Humans, Oxidation-Reduction, Plant Extracts
Show Abstract · Added October 9, 2015
Extracts from the rhizome of the turmeric plant are widely consumed as anti-inflammatory dietary supplements. Turmeric extract contains the three curcuminoids, curcumin (≈80% relative abundance), demethoxycurcumin (DMC; ≈15%), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC; ≈5%). A distinct feature of pure curcumin is its instability at physiological pH, resulting in rapid autoxidation to a bicyclopentadione within 10-15 min. Here, we describe oxidative transformation of turmeric extract, DMC, and BDMC and the identification of their oxidation products using LC-MS and NMR analyses. DMC autoxidized over the course of 24 h to the expected bicyclopentadione diastereomers. BDMC was resistant to autoxidation, and oxidative transformation required catalysis by horseradish peroxidase and H2O2 or potassium ferricyanide. The product of BDMC oxidation was a stable spiroepoxide that was equivalent to a reaction intermediate in the autoxidation of curcumin. The ability of DMC and BDMC to poison recombinant human topoisomerase IIα was significantly increased in the presence of potassium ferricyanide, indicating that oxidative transformation was required to achieve full DNA cleavage activity. DMC and BDMC are less prone to autoxidation than curcumin and contribute to the enhanced stability of turmeric extract at physiological pH. Their oxidative metabolites may contribute to the biological effects of turmeric extract.
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11 MeSH Terms
Cytotoxic and pathogenic properties of Klebsiella oxytoca isolated from laboratory animals.
Darby A, Lertpiriyapong K, Sarkar U, Seneviratne U, Park DS, Gamazon ER, Batchelder C, Cheung C, Buckley EM, Taylor NS, Shen Z, Tannenbaum SR, Wishnok JS, Fox JG
(2014) PLoS One 9: e100542
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Secretion Systems, Bacterial Toxins, Benzodiazepinones, Cell Death, Cell Line, Cell Survival, Haplorhini, HeLa Cells, Humans, Klebsiella Infections, Klebsiella oxytoca, Mice, Plant Extracts, Rats, Soybeans, Swine
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
Klebsiella oxytoca is an opportunistic pathogen implicated in various clinical diseases in animals and humans. Studies suggest that in humans K. oxytoca exerts its pathogenicity in part through a cytotoxin. However, cytotoxin production in animal isolates of K. oxytoca and its pathogenic properties have not been characterized. Furthermore, neither the identity of the toxin nor a complete repertoire of genes involved in K. oxytoca pathogenesis have been fully elucidated. Here, we showed that several animal isolates of K. oxytoca, including the clinical isolates, produced secreted products in bacterial culture supernatant that display cytotoxicity on HEp-2 and HeLa cells, indicating the ability to produce cytotoxin. Cytotoxin production appears to be regulated by the environment, and soy based product was found to have a strong toxin induction property. The toxin was identified, by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, as low molecular weight heat labile benzodiazepine, tilivalline, previously shown to cause cytotoxicity in several cell lines, including mouse L1210 leukemic cells. Genome sequencing and analyses of a cytotoxin positive K. oxytoca strain isolated from an abscess of a mouse, identified genes previously shown to promote pathogenesis in other enteric bacterial pathogens including ecotin, several genes encoding for type IV and type VI secretion systems, and proteins that show sequence similarity to known bacterial toxins including cholera toxin. To our knowledge, these results demonstrate for the first time, that animal isolates of K. oxytoca, produces a cytotoxin, and that cytotoxin production is under strict environmental regulation. We also confirmed tilivalline as the cytotoxin present in animal K. oxytoca strains. These findings, along with the discovery of a repertoire of genes with virulence potential, provide important insights into the pathogenesis of K. oxytoca. As a novel diagnostic tool, tilivalline may serve as a biomarker for K oxytoca-induced cytotoxicity in humans and animals through detection in various samples from food to diseased samples using LC-MS/MS. Induction of K. oxytoca cytotoxin by consumption of soy may be in part involved in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease.
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Oxidative metabolites of curcumin poison human type II topoisomerases.
Ketron AC, Gordon ON, Schneider C, Osheroff N
(2013) Biochemistry 52: 221-7
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Coloring Agents, Curcuma, Curcumin, DNA Cleavage, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, Humans, Oxidation-Reduction, Plant Extracts
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
The polyphenol curcumin is the principal flavor and color component of the spice turmeric. Beyond its culinary uses, curcumin is believed to positively impact human health and displays antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and chemopreventive properties. It also is in clinical trials as an anticancer agent. In aqueous solution at physiological pH, curcumin undergoes spontaneous autoxidation that is enhanced by oxidizing agents. The reaction proceeds through a series of quinone methide and other reactive intermediates to form a final dioxygenated bicyclopentadione product. Several naturally occurring polyphenols that can form quinones have been shown to act as topoisomerase II poisons (i.e., they increase levels of topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage). Because several of these compounds have chemopreventive properties, we determined the effects of curcumin, its oxidative metabolites, and structurally related degradation products (vanillin, ferulic acid, and feruloylmethane) on the DNA cleavage activities of human topoisomerase IIα and IIβ. Intermediates in the curcumin oxidation pathway increased the level of DNA scission mediated by both enzymes ~4-5-fold. In contrast, curcumin and the bicyclopentadione, as well as vanillin, ferulic acid, and feruloylmethane, had no effect on DNA cleavage. As found for other quinone-based compounds, curcumin oxidation intermediates acted as redox-dependent (as opposed to interfacial) topoisomerase II poisons. Finally, under conditions that promote oxidation, the dietary spice turmeric enhanced topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage. Thus, even within the more complex spice formulation, oxidized curcumin intermediates appear to function as topoisomerase II poisons.
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9 MeSH Terms
Effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on nitric oxide metabolism and blood pressure in menopausal women.
Wong WW, Taylor AA, Smith EO, Barnes S, Hachey DL
(2012) Am J Clin Nutr 95: 1487-94
MeSH Terms: Blood Pressure, Dietary Supplements, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Hypocotyl, Isoflavones, Menopause, Middle Aged, Nitric Oxide, Plant Extracts, Soybeans
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
BACKGROUND - Isoflavones, having chemical structures similar to estrogens, are believed to stimulate nitric oxide production and thus lower blood pressure. The efficacy of soy isoflavone supplementation to stimulate nitric oxide production and lower blood pressure in menopausal women with high normal blood pressure remains unknown.
OBJECTIVE - The objective was to test the effect of soy isoflavone supplementation on nitric oxide production and blood pressure in menopausal women with high normal blood pressure.
DESIGN - A randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled 6-wk trial was conducted to assess the effects of daily supplementation with 80 mg soy hypocotyl isoflavones (in aglycone units) on nitric oxide metabolism and blood pressure in 24 menopausal women with 12 women per group. Changes in nitric oxide metabolism were assessed via a primed, constant-infusion protocol with [15N]arginine and [13C]- and [2H]citrulline. Changes in blood pressure and associated vascular hemodynamics were assessed via office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, forearm blood flow, and indexes of arterial compliance.
RESULTS - When compared with placebo and after control for pretreatment values, soy isoflavone supplementation had no effect on arginine flux, citrulline flux, nitric oxide synthesis, blood pressure, forearm blood flow, or estimates of arterial stiffness.
CONCLUSION - Daily supplementation with 80 mg soy hypocotyl isoflavones over a 6-wk period had no effect on nitric oxide metabolism or blood pressure and associated vascular hemodynamics in menopausal women with high normal blood pressure.
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12 MeSH Terms
Anti-inflammatory activity of Chios mastic gum is associated with inhibition of TNF-alpha induced oxidative stress.
Triantafyllou A, Bikineyeva A, Dikalova A, Nazarewicz R, Lerakis S, Dikalov S
(2011) Nutr J 10: 64
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin II, Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Antioxidants, Cells, Cultured, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Endothelial Cells, Hydrogen Peroxide, Mastic Resin, NADPH Oxidases, Oxidative Stress, Pistacia, Plant Extracts, Protein Kinase C, Rats, Resins, Plant, Superoxides, Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added June 9, 2014
BACKGROUND - Gum of Chios mastic (Pistacia lentiscus var. chia) is a natural antimicrobial agent that has found extensive use in pharmaceutical products and as a nutritional supplement. The molecular mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory activity, however, are not clear. In this work, the potential role of antioxidant activity of Chios mastic gum has been evaluated.
METHODS - Scavenging of superoxide radical was investigated by electron spin resonance and spin trapping technique using EMPO spin trap in xanthine oxidase system. Superoxide production in endothelial and smooth muscle cells stimulated with TNF-α or angiotensin II and treated with vehicle (DMSO) or mastic gum (0.1-10 μg/ml) was measured by DHE and HPLC. Cellular H2O2 was measured by Amplex Red. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with mastic gum was determined by the decrease of purified PKC activity, by inhibition of PKC activity in cellular homogenate and by attenuation of superoxide production in cells treated with PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).
RESULTS - Spin trapping study did not show significant scavenging of superoxide by mastic gum itself. However, mastic gum inhibited cellular production of superoxide and H2O2 in dose dependent manner in TNF-α treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells but did not affect unstimulated cells. TNF-α significantly increased the cellular superoxide production by NADPH oxidase, while mastic gum completely abolished this stimulation. Mastic gum inhibited the activity of purified PKC, decreased PKC activity in cell homogenate, and attenuated superoxide production in cells stimulated with PKC activator PMA and PKC-dependent angiotensin II in endothelial cells.
CONCLUSION - We suggest that mastic gum inhibits PKC which attenuates production of superoxide and H2O2 by NADPH oxidases. This antioxidant property may have direct implication to the anti-inflammatory activity of the Chios mastic gum.
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19 MeSH Terms