Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 93

Publication Record

Connections

Aberrant FGFR signaling mediates resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors in ER+ breast cancer.
Formisano L, Lu Y, Servetto A, Hanker AB, Jansen VM, Bauer JA, Sudhan DR, Guerrero-Zotano AL, Croessmann S, Guo Y, Ericsson PG, Lee KM, Nixon MJ, Schwarz LJ, Sanders ME, Dugger TC, Cruz MR, Behdad A, Cristofanilli M, Bardia A, O'Shaughnessy J, Nagy RJ, Lanman RB, Solovieff N, He W, Miller M, Su F, Shyr Y, Mayer IA, Balko JM, Arteaga CL
(2019) Nat Commun 10: 1373
MeSH Terms: Aminopyridines, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Breast Neoplasms, Circulating Tumor DNA, Cyclin D1, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 6, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Female, Fulvestrant, High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing, Humans, MCF-7 Cells, Mice, Mutation, Naphthalenes, Piperazines, Progression-Free Survival, Proportional Hazards Models, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Purines, Pyrazoles, Pyridines, Quinolines, Quinoxalines, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 1, Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 2, Receptors, Estrogen, Signal Transduction, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Using an ORF kinome screen in MCF-7 cells treated with the CDK4/6 inhibitor ribociclib plus fulvestrant, we identified FGFR1 as a mechanism of drug resistance. FGFR1-amplified/ER+ breast cancer cells and MCF-7 cells transduced with FGFR1 were resistant to fulvestrant ± ribociclib or palbociclib. This resistance was abrogated by treatment with the FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lucitanib. Addition of the FGFR TKI erdafitinib to palbociclib/fulvestrant induced complete responses of FGFR1-amplified/ER+ patient-derived-xenografts. Next generation sequencing of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in 34 patients after progression on CDK4/6 inhibitors identified FGFR1/2 amplification or activating mutations in 14/34 (41%) post-progression specimens. Finally, ctDNA from patients enrolled in MONALEESA-2, the registration trial of ribociclib, showed that patients with FGFR1 amplification exhibited a shorter progression-free survival compared to patients with wild type FGFR1. Thus, we propose breast cancers with FGFR pathway alterations should be considered for trials using combinations of ER, CDK4/6 and FGFR antagonists.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
32 MeSH Terms
Haloperidol and Ziprasidone for Treatment of Delirium in Critical Illness.
Girard TD, Exline MC, Carson SS, Hough CL, Rock P, Gong MN, Douglas IS, Malhotra A, Owens RL, Feinstein DJ, Khan B, Pisani MA, Hyzy RC, Schmidt GA, Schweickert WD, Hite RD, Bowton DL, Masica AL, Thompson JL, Chandrasekhar R, Pun BT, Strength C, Boehm LM, Jackson JC, Pandharipande PP, Brummel NE, Hughes CG, Patel MB, Stollings JL, Bernard GR, Dittus RS, Ely EW, MIND-USA Investigators
(2018) N Engl J Med 379: 2506-2516
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antipsychotic Agents, Critical Illness, Delirium, Dopamine Antagonists, Double-Blind Method, Female, Haloperidol, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Piperazines, Respiratory Insufficiency, Shock, Thiazoles, Treatment Failure
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2018
BACKGROUND - There are conflicting data on the effects of antipsychotic medications on delirium in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU).
METHODS - In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we assigned patients with acute respiratory failure or shock and hypoactive or hyperactive delirium to receive intravenous boluses of haloperidol (maximum dose, 20 mg daily), ziprasidone (maximum dose, 40 mg daily), or placebo. The volume and dose of a trial drug or placebo was halved or doubled at 12-hour intervals on the basis of the presence or absence of delirium, as detected with the use of the Confusion Assessment Method for the ICU, and of side effects of the intervention. The primary end point was the number of days alive without delirium or coma during the 14-day intervention period. Secondary end points included 30-day and 90-day survival, time to freedom from mechanical ventilation, and time to ICU and hospital discharge. Safety end points included extrapyramidal symptoms and excessive sedation.
RESULTS - Written informed consent was obtained from 1183 patients or their authorized representatives. Delirium developed in 566 patients (48%), of whom 89% had hypoactive delirium and 11% had hyperactive delirium. Of the 566 patients, 184 were randomly assigned to receive placebo, 192 to receive haloperidol, and 190 to receive ziprasidone. The median duration of exposure to a trial drug or placebo was 4 days (interquartile range, 3 to 7). The median number of days alive without delirium or coma was 8.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.6 to 9.9) in the placebo group, 7.9 (95% CI, 4.4 to 9.6) in the haloperidol group, and 8.7 (95% CI, 5.9 to 10.0) in the ziprasidone group (P=0.26 for overall effect across trial groups). The use of haloperidol or ziprasidone, as compared with placebo, had no significant effect on the primary end point (odds ratios, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.64 to 1.21] and 1.04 [95% CI, 0.73 to 1.48], respectively). There were no significant between-group differences with respect to the secondary end points or the frequency of extrapyramidal symptoms.
CONCLUSIONS - The use of haloperidol or ziprasidone, as compared with placebo, in patients with acute respiratory failure or shock and hypoactive or hyperactive delirium in the ICU did not significantly alter the duration of delirium. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the VA Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center; MIND-USA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01211522 .).
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Therapeutic endocannabinoid augmentation for mood and anxiety disorders: comparative profiling of FAAH, MAGL and dual inhibitors.
Bedse G, Bluett RJ, Patrick TA, Romness NK, Gaulden AD, Kingsley PJ, Plath N, Marnett LJ, Patel S
(2018) Transl Psychiatry 8: 92
MeSH Terms: Amidohydrolases, Animals, Anti-Anxiety Agents, Anxiety Disorders, Behavior, Animal, Benzodioxoles, Body Temperature, Brain, Carbamates, Endocannabinoids, Female, Locomotion, Male, Maze Learning, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred ICR, Monoacylglycerol Lipases, Piperazines, Piperidines, Pyridines, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2019
Recent studies have demonstrated anxiolytic potential of pharmacological endocannabinoid (eCB) augmentation approaches in a variety of preclinical models. Pharmacological inhibition of endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes, such as fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), elicit promising anxiolytic effects in rodent models with limited adverse behavioral effects, however, the efficacy of dual FAAH/MAGL inhibition has not been investigated. In the present study, we compared the effects of FAAH (PF-3845), MAGL (JZL184) and dual FAAH/MAGL (JZL195) inhibitors on (1) anxiety-like behaviors under non-stressed and stressed conditions, (2) locomotor activity and body temperature, (3) lipid levels in the brain and (4) cognitive functions. Behavioral analysis showed that PF-3845 or JZL184, but not JZL195, was able to prevent restraint stress-induced anxiety in the light-dark box assay when administered before stress exposure. Moreover, JZL195 treatment was not able to reverse foot shock-induced anxiety-like behavior in the elevated zero maze or light-dark box. JZL195, but not PF-3845 or JZL184, decreased body temperature and increased anxiety-like behavior in the open-field test. Overall, JZL195 did not show anxiolytic efficacy and the effects of JZL184 were more robust than that of PF-3845 in the models examined. These results showed that increasing either endogenous AEA or 2-AG separately produces anti-anxiety effects under stressful conditions but the same effects are not obtained from simultaneously increasing both AEA and 2-AG.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
MDM2 Antagonists Counteract Drug-Induced DNA Damage.
Vilgelm AE, Cobb P, Malikayil K, Flaherty D, Andrew Johnson C, Raman D, Saleh N, Higgins B, Vara BA, Johnston JN, Johnson DB, Kelley MC, Chen SC, Ayers GD, Richmond A
(2017) EBioMedicine 24: 43-55
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Azepines, Cell Line, Tumor, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21, DNA Damage, DNA Replication, HCT116 Cells, Humans, Imidazoles, Melanoma, Mice, Piperazines, Protein Binding, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2, Pyrimidines, Pyrrolidines, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays, para-Aminobenzoates
Show Abstract · Added June 20, 2018
Antagonists of MDM2-p53 interaction are emerging anti-cancer drugs utilized in clinical trials for malignancies that rarely mutate p53, including melanoma. We discovered that MDM2-p53 antagonists protect DNA from drug-induced damage in melanoma cells and patient-derived xenografts. Among the tested DNA damaging drugs were various inhibitors of Aurora and Polo-like mitotic kinases, as well as traditional chemotherapy. Mitotic kinase inhibition causes mitotic slippage, DNA re-replication, and polyploidy. Here we show that re-replication of the polyploid genome generates replicative stress which leads to DNA damage. MDM2-p53 antagonists relieve replicative stress via the p53-dependent activation of p21 which inhibits DNA replication. Loss of p21 promoted drug-induced DNA damage in melanoma cells and enhanced anti-tumor activity of therapy combining MDM2 antagonist with mitotic kinase inhibitor in mice. In summary, MDM2 antagonists may reduce DNA damaging effects of anti-cancer drugs if they are administered together, while targeting p21 can improve the efficacy of such combinations.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Serotonin Transporter-Independent Actions of the Antidepressant Vortioxetine As Revealed Using the SERT Met172 Mouse.
Nackenoff AG, Simmler LD, Baganz NL, Pehrson AL, Sánchez C, Blakely RD
(2017) ACS Chem Neurosci 8: 1092-1100
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Behavior, Animal, Depression, Disease Models, Animal, Hindlimb Suspension, Hippocampus, Mice, Neurogenesis, Piperazines, Serotonin, Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Sulfides, Synaptosomes, Vortioxetine
Show Abstract · Added August 31, 2018
Selective serotonin (5-HT, SERT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed treatments for depression. However, they have delayed efficacy and can induce side-effects that can encourage discontinuation. Recently, agents have been developed, including vortioxetine (Trintellix), that augment SERT blockade with interactions at other targets. At therapeutic doses, vortioxetine interacts with SERT as well as 5-HT, 5-HT, 5-HT, and 5-HT receptors. We assessed the SERT-dependency of vortioxetine action using the SERT Met172 mouse model, which disrupts high-affinity interactions of many antidepressants with the transporter. We demonstrate that the SERT Met172 substitution induces an ∼19-fold loss in vortioxetine potency for SERT inhibition in midbrain synaptosomes. Moreover, in these mice, we observed reduced SERT occupancy, a diminished ability to prolong 5-HT clearance, and a reduced capacity to elevate extracellular 5-HT. Despite reduced interactions with SERT, vortioxetine maintained its ability to enhance mobility in tail suspension and forced swim tests, reduce consumption latency in the novelty induced hypophagia test, and promoted proliferation and survival of subgranular zone hippocampal stem cells. Our findings suggest that the antidepressant actions of vortioxetine may be SERT-independent, and encourage consideration of agents that mimic one or more actions of the drug in the development of improved depression treatments.
1 Communities
0 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Targeted Apoptosis of Parietal Cells Is Insufficient to Induce Metaplasia in Stomach.
Burclaff J, Osaki LH, Liu D, Goldenring JR, Mills JC
(2017) Gastroenterology 152: 762-766.e7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Atrophy, Azetidines, Cell Proliferation, Cellular Reprogramming, Chief Cells, Gastric, Diphtheria Toxin, Heparin-binding EGF-like Growth Factor, Intrinsic Factor, Metaplasia, Mice, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Piperazines, Plant Lectins, Stomach, Tamoxifen
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Parietal cell atrophy is considered to cause metaplasia in the stomach. We developed mice that express the diphtheria toxin receptor specifically in parietal cells to induce their death, and found this to increase proliferation in the normal stem cell zone and neck but not to cause metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells. Furthermore, the metaplasia-inducing agents tamoxifen or DMP-777 still induced metaplasia even after previous destruction of parietal cells by diphtheria toxin. Atrophy of parietal cells alone therefore is not sufficient to induce metaplasia: completion of metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells requires mechanisms beyond parietal cell injury or death.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Panobinostat sensitizes cyclin E high, homologous recombination-proficient ovarian cancer to olaparib.
Wilson AJ, Sarfo-Kantanka K, Barrack T, Steck A, Saskowski J, Crispens MA, Khabele D
(2016) Gynecol Oncol 143: 143-151
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Cyclin E, DNA Repair, Drug Synergism, Female, Homologous Recombination, Humans, Hydroxamic Acids, Indoles, Oncogene Proteins, Ovarian Neoplasms, Panobinostat, Phthalazines, Piperazines
Show Abstract · Added March 4, 2019
OBJECTIVE - Homologous recombination (HR) proficient ovarian cancers, including CCNE1 (cyclin E)-amplified tumors, are resistant to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are effective in overcoming tumor resistance to DNA damaging drugs. Our goal was to determine whether panobinostat, a newly FDA-approved HDACi, can sensitize cyclin E, HR-proficient ovarian cancer cells to the PARPi olaparib.
METHODS - Expression levels of CCNE1 (cyclin E), BRCA1, RAD51 and E2F1 in ovarian tumors and cell lines were extracted from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Broad-Novartis Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE). In HR-proficient ovarian cancer cell line models (OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4, SKOV-3, and UWB1.289+BRCA1 wild-type), cell growth and viability were assessed by sulforhodamine B and xenograft assays. DNA damage and repair (pH2AX and RAD51 co-localization and DRGFP reporter activity) and apoptosis (cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3) were assessed by immunofluorescence and Western blot assays.
RESULTS - TCGA and CCLE data revealed positive correlations (Spearman) between cyclin E E2F1, and E2F1 gene targets related to DNA repair (BRCA1 and RAD51). Panobinostat downregulated cyclin E and HR repair pathway genes, and reduced HR efficiency in cyclin E-amplified OVCAR-3 cells. Further, panobinostat synergized with olaparib in reducing cell growth and viability in HR-proficient cells. Similar co-operative effects were observed in xenografts, and on pharmacodynamic markers of HR repair, DNA damage and apoptosis.
CONCLUSIONS - These results provide preclinical rationale for using HDACi to reduce HR in cyclin E-overexpressing and other types of HR-proficient ovarian cancer as a means of enhancing PARPi activity.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Phase II Study of Olaparib (AZD-2281) After Standard Systemic Therapies for Disseminated Colorectal Cancer.
Leichman L, Groshen S, O'Neil BH, Messersmith W, Berlin J, Chan E, Leichman CG, Cohen SJ, Cohen D, Lenz HJ, Gold P, Boman B, Fielding A, Locker G, Cason RC, Hamilton SR, Hochster HS
(2016) Oncologist 21: 172-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Colorectal Neoplasms, DNA Methylation, DNA Mismatch Repair, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Male, Microsatellite Instability, Middle Aged, Phthalazines, Piperazines, Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added May 7, 2016
BACKGROUND - Effective new agents for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) with disease progression during standard therapy regimens are needed. We hypothesized that poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor therapy in patients with CRC and inefficient tumor DNA repair mechanisms, such as those with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H), would result in synthetic lethality.
METHODS - This was an open-label phase II trial testing olaparib 400 mg p.o. b.i.d. for patients with disseminated, measurable CRC failing standard therapies with centrally confirmed tumor MSI status. The primary endpoint was the tumor response, assessed by RECIST, version 1.0. The secondary endpoints were safety/toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS).
RESULTS - Thirty-three patients (20 microsatellite stable [MSS], 13 MSI-H) were enrolled. The median age for all patients was 57 years and for MSS and MSI-H patients was 51 and 61 years, respectively. All patients received at least one 28-day cycle of olaparib. No patient had a complete or partial response. Nausea (48%), fatigue (36%), and vomiting (33%) were the most commonly reported treatment-related adverse events. The median PFS for all patients was 1.84 months. No statistically significant differences were found in the median PFS or OS for the MSS group compared with the MSI-H group.
CONCLUSION - Single-agent olaparib delivered after failure of standard systemic therapy did not demonstrate activity for CRC patients, regardless of microsatellite status. Future trials, testing PARP inhibitors in patients with CRC should focus on the use of DNA-damaging chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, combined with PARP inhibitors, remembering the toxicity reported in the present study.
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE - Microsatellite instability (MSI-H) colorectal tumors exhibit hypermethylation in tumor mismatch repair genes, or have mutations in one or more of these genes resulting from a germ-line defect (Lynch syndrome). PARP inhibitors such as olaparib are most effective in tumors associated with inability to repair DNA damage. However, in this trial, single agent olaparib failed to elicit responses in patients with MSI-H colorectal tumors, and in those with microsatellite-stable tumors. It is possible that by adding olaparib to radiation therapy, or to a systemic DNA damaging agent, tumor lethality could be obtained. However, the price would be increased toxicity.
©AlphaMed Press.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Pharmacologically Increasing Mdm2 Inhibits DNA Repair and Cooperates with Genotoxic Agents to Kill p53-Inactivated Ovarian Cancer Cells.
Carrillo AM, Hicks M, Khabele D, Eischen CM
(2015) Mol Cancer Res 13: 1197-205
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Cisplatin, Comet Assay, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Etoposide, Female, Fibroblasts, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Imidazoles, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mutagens, Ovarian Neoplasms, Piperazines, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
UNLABELLED - The Mdm2 oncogene is a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor and recently identified inhibitor of DNA break repair. Nutlin-3 is a small-molecule inhibitor of Mdm2-p53 interaction that can induce apoptosis in cancer cells through activation of p53. Although this is a promising therapy for those cancers with wild-type p53, half of all human cancers have inactivated p53. Here, we reveal that a previously unappreciated effect of Nutlin is inhibition of DNA break repair, stemming from its ability to increase Mdm2 protein levels. The Nutlin-induced increase in Mdm2 inhibited DNA double-strand break repair and prolonged DNA damage response signaling independent of p53. Mechanistically, this effect of Nutlin required Mdm2 and acted through Nbs1 of the Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 DNA repair complex. In ovarian cancer cells, where >90% have inactivated p53, Nutlin combined with the genotoxic agents, cisplatin or etoposide, had a cooperative lethal effect resulting in increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Therefore, these data demonstrate an unexpected consequence of pharmacologically increasing Mdm2 levels that when used in combination with genotoxic agents induces synthetic lethality in ovarian cancer cells, and likely other malignant cell types, that have inactivated p53.
IMPLICATIONS - Data reveal a therapeutically beneficial effect of pharmacologically increasing Mdm2 levels combined with chemotherapeutic agents for malignancies that have lost functional p53.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Mdm2 and aurora kinase a inhibitors synergize to block melanoma growth by driving apoptosis and immune clearance of tumor cells.
Vilgelm AE, Pawlikowski JS, Liu Y, Hawkins OE, Davis TA, Smith J, Weller KP, Horton LW, McClain CM, Ayers GD, Turner DC, Essaka DC, Stewart CF, Sosman JA, Kelley MC, Ecsedy JA, Johnston JN, Richmond A
(2015) Cancer Res 75: 181-93
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Apoptosis, Aurora Kinase A, Azepines, Cell Proliferation, Humans, Imidazoles, Melanoma, Melanoma, Experimental, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Nude, Piperazines, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-mdm2, Pyrimidines
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Therapeutics that induce cancer cell senescence can block cell proliferation and promote immune rejection. However, the risk of tumor relapse due to senescence escape may remain high due to the long lifespan of senescent cells that are not cleared. Here, we show how combining a senescence-inducing inhibitor of the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA) with an MDM2 antagonist activates p53 in senescent tumors harboring wild-type 53. In the model studied, this effect is accompanied by proliferation arrest, mitochondrial depolarization, apoptosis, and immune clearance of cancer cells by antitumor leukocytes in a manner reliant upon Ccl5, Ccl1, and Cxcl9. The AURKA/MDM2 combination therapy shows adequate bioavailability and low toxicity to the host. Moreover, the prominent response of patient-derived melanoma tumors to coadministered MDM2 and AURKA inhibitors offers a sound rationale for clinical evaluation. Taken together, our work provides a preclinical proof of concept for a combination treatment that leverages both senescence and immune surveillance to therapeutic ends.
©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.
2 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms