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Structural basis of arrestin-3 activation and signaling.
Chen Q, Perry NA, Vishnivetskiy SA, Berndt S, Gilbert NC, Zhuo Y, Singh PK, Tholen J, Ohi MD, Gurevich EV, Brautigam CA, Klug CS, Gurevich VV, Iverson TM
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 1427
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Arrestins, Binding Sites, Cattle, Crystallography, X-Ray, Humans, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 10, Models, Molecular, Phytic Acid, Protein Conformation, Protein Structure, Quaternary, Recombinant Proteins, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
A unique aspect of arrestin-3 is its ability to support both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent signaling. Here, we show that inositol hexakisphosphate (IP) is a non-receptor activator of arrestin-3 and report the structure of IP-activated arrestin-3 at 2.4-Å resolution. IP-activated arrestin-3 exhibits an inter-domain twist and a displaced C-tail, hallmarks of active arrestin. IP binds to the arrestin phosphate sensor, and is stabilized by trimerization. Analysis of the trimerization surface, which is also the receptor-binding surface, suggests a feature called the finger loop as a key region of the activation sensor. We show that finger loop helicity and flexibility may underlie coupling to hundreds of diverse receptors and also promote arrestin-3 activation by IP. Importantly, we show that effector-binding sites on arrestins have distinct conformations in the basal and activated states, acting as switch regions. These switch regions may work with the inter-domain twist to initiate and direct arrestin-mediated signaling.
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14 MeSH Terms
Using two-site binding models to analyze microscale thermophoresis data.
Tso SC, Chen Q, Vishnivetskiy SA, Gurevich VV, Iverson TM, Brautigam CA
(2018) Anal Biochem 540-541: 64-75
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Monophosphate, Algorithms, Animals, Aptamers, Nucleotide, Binding Sites, Cattle, Kinetics, Models, Molecular, Monte Carlo Method, Mutagenesis, Site-Directed, Phytic Acid, Protein Binding, Recombinant Proteins, beta-Arrestin 2
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The emergence of microscale thermophoresis (MST) as a technique for determining the dissociation constants for bimolecular interactions has enabled these quantities to be measured in systems that were previously difficult or impracticable. However, most models for analyses of these data featured the assumption of a simple 1:1 binding interaction. The only model widely used for multiple binding sites was the Hill equation. Here, we describe two new MST analytic models that assume a 1:2 binding scheme: the first features two microscopic binding constants (K(1) and K(2)), while the other assumes symmetry in the bivalent molecule, culminating in a model with a single macroscopic dissociation constant (K) and a single factor (α) that accounts for apparent cooperativity in the binding. We also discuss the general applicability of the Hill equation for MST data. The performances of the algorithms on both real and simulated data are assessed, and implementation of the algorithms in the MST analysis program PALMIST is discussed.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Nup42 and IP coordinate Gle1 stimulation of Dbp5/DDX19B for mRNA export in yeast and human cells.
Adams RL, Mason AC, Glass L, Aditi , Wente SR
(2017) Traffic 18: 776-790
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Humans, Nuclear Pore, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Phytic Acid, RNA, Messenger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2018
The mRNA lifecycle is driven through spatiotemporal changes in the protein composition of mRNA particles (mRNPs) that are triggered by RNA-dependent DEAD-box protein (Dbp) ATPases. As mRNPs exit the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this remodeling occurs through activation of Dbp5 by inositol hexakisphosphate (IP )-bound Gle1. At the NPC, Gle1 also binds Nup42, but Nup42's molecular function is unclear. Here we employ the power of structure-function analysis in S. cerevisiae and human (h) cells, and find that the high-affinity Nup42-Gle1 interaction is integral to Dbp5 (hDDX19B) activation and efficient mRNA export. The Nup42 carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) binds Gle1/hGle1B at an interface distinct from the Gle1-Dbp5/hDDX19B interaction site. A nup42-CTD/gle1-CTD/Dbp5 trimeric complex forms in the presence of IP . Deletion of NUP42 abrogates Gle1-Dbp5 interaction, and disruption of the Nup42 or IP binding interfaces on Gle1/hGle1B leads to defective mRNA export in S. cerevisiae and human cells. In vitro, Nup42-CTD and IP stimulate Gle1/hGle1B activation of Dbp5 and DDX19B recombinant proteins in similar, nonadditive manners, demonstrating complete functional conservation between humans and S. cerevisiae. Together, a highly conserved mechanism governs spatial coordination of mRNP remodeling during export. This has implications for understanding human disease mutations that perturb the Nup42-hGle1B interaction.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
An amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutation in GLE1 alters the cellular pool of human Gle1 functional isoforms.
Aditi , Glass L, Dawson TR, Wente SR
(2016) Adv Biol Regul 62: 25-36
MeSH Terms: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Animals, Cytoplasm, Cytoplasmic Granules, Gene Expression, HeLa Cells, Humans, Mutagenesis, Insertional, Nuclear Envelope, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Phytic Acid, Point Mutation, Protein Aggregates, Protein Isoforms, RNA, Small Interfering
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal late onset motor neuron disease with underlying cellular defects in RNA metabolism. In prior studies, two deleterious heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding human (h)Gle1 were identified in ALS patients. hGle1 is an mRNA processing modulator that requires inositol hexakisphosphate (IP) binding for function. Interestingly, one hGLE1 mutation (c.1965-2A>C) results in a novel 88 amino acid C-terminal insertion, generating an altered protein. Like hGle1A, at steady state, the altered protein termed hGle1-IVS14-2A>C is absent from the nuclear envelope rim and localizes to the cytoplasm. hGle1A performs essential cytoplasmic functions in translation and stress granule regulation. Therefore, we speculated that the ALS disease pathology results from altered cellular pools of hGle1 and increased cytoplasmic hGle1 activity. GFP-hGle1-IVS14-2A>C localized to stress granules comparably to GFP-hGle1A, and rescued stress granule defects following siRNA-mediated hGle1 depletion. As described for hGle1A, overexpression of the hGle1-IVS14-2A>C protein also induced formation of larger SGs. Interestingly, hGle1A and the disease associated hGle1-IVS14-2A>C overexpression induced the formation of distinct cytoplasmic protein aggregates that appear similar to those found in neurodegenerative diseases. Strikingly, the ALS-linked hGle1-IVS14-2A>C protein also rescued mRNA export defects upon depletion of endogenous hGle1, acting in a potentially novel bi-functional manner. We conclude that the ALS-linked hGle1-c.1965-2A>C mutation generates a protein isoform capable of both hGle1A- and hGle1B-ascribed functions, and thereby uncoupled from normal mechanisms of hGle1 regulation.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Self-association of arrestin family members.
Chen Q, Zhuo Y, Kim M, Hanson SM, Francis DJ, Vishnivetskiy SA, Altenbach C, Klug CS, Hubbell WL, Gurevich VV
(2014) Handb Exp Pharmacol 219: 205-23
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arrestins, Crystallization, Humans, Phytic Acid, Protein Multimerization, Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells, Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Mammals express four arrestin subtypes, three of which have been shown to self-associate. Cone photoreceptor-specific arrestin-4 is the only one that is a constitutive monomer. Visual arrestin-1 forms tetramers both in crystal and in solution, but the shape of its physiologically relevant solution tetramer is very different from that in the crystal. The biological role of the self-association of arrestin-1, expressed at very high levels in rod and cone photoreceptors, appears to be protective, reducing the concentration of cytotoxic monomers. The two nonvisual arrestin subtypes are highly homologous, and self-association of both is facilitated by IP6, yet they form dramatically different oligomers. Arrestin-2 apparently self-associates into "infinite" chains, very similar to those observed in IP6-soaked crystals, where IP6 connects the concave sides of the N- and C-domains of adjacent protomers. In contrast, arrestin-3 only forms dimers, in which IP6 likely connects the C-domains of two arrestin-3 molecules. Thus, each of the three self-associating arrestins does it in its own way, forming three different types of oligomers. The physiological role of the oligomerization of arrestin-1 and both nonvisual arrestins might be quite different, and in each case it remains to be definitively elucidated.
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1 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Dbp5, Gle1-IP6 and Nup159: a working model for mRNP export.
Folkmann AW, Noble KN, Cole CN, Wente SR
(2011) Nucleus 2: 540-8
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Cell Nucleus, Cytoplasm, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Models, Biological, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Phytic Acid, Ribonucleoproteins
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2014
Gene expression is a stepwise process involving distinct cellular processes including transcription, mRNA (mRNA) processing, mRNA export, and translation. As mRNAs are being synthesized, proteins associate with the RNA to form messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). Previous studies have demonstrated that the RNA-binding protein composition of these mRNPs is dynamic, changing as the mRNP moves through the different steps of gene expression, and playing a critical role in these events. An important step during this maturation process occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) where the export protein Gle1 bound to inositol hexakisphosphate (IP 6) spatially activates the ATP-hydrolysis and mRNP-remodeling activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5. Recent work from our laboratory and others has provided important insights into the function and regulation of Dbp5. These include a more detailed explanation of the mechanism of Dbp5 RNP remodeling, the role of Gle1-IP6 in stimulating Dbp5 ATPase activity, and the identification of a novel paradigm for regulation of Dbp5 by Nup159. Based on in vitro biochemical assays, X-ray crystallography, and corresponding in vivo phenotypes, we propose here an updated model of the Dbp5 cycle during mRNP export through the NPC. This takes into account all available data and provides a platform for future studies.
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13 MeSH Terms
Elucidation of inositol hexaphosphate and heparin interaction sites and conformational changes in arrestin-1 by solution nuclear magnetic resonance.
Zhuang T, Vishnivetskiy SA, Gurevich VV, Sanders CR
(2010) Biochemistry 49: 10473-85
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Arrestins, Binding Sites, Cattle, Crystallography, X-Ray, Escherichia coli, Heparin, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Molecular Sequence Data, Phytic Acid, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Rabbits, Solutions
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Arrestins specifically bind activated and phosphorylated G protein-coupled receptors and orchestrate both receptor trafficking and channel signaling through G protein-independent pathways via direct interactions with numerous nonreceptor partners. Here we report the first successful use of solution NMR in mapping the binding sites in arrestin-1 (visual arrestin) for two polyanionic compounds that mimic phosphorylated light-activated rhodopsin: inositol hexaphosphate (IP6) and heparin. This yielded an identification of residues involved in the binding with these ligands that was more complete than what has previously been feasible. IP6 and heparin appear to bind to the same site on arrestin-1, centered on a positively charged region in the N-domain. We present the first direct evidence that both IP6 and heparin induced a complete release of the arrestin C-tail. These observations provide novel insight into the nature of the transition of arrestin from the basal to active state and demonstrate the potential of NMR-based methods in the study of protein-protein interactions involving members of the arrestin family.
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2 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Control of mRNA export and translation termination by inositol hexakisphosphate requires specific interaction with Gle1.
Alcázar-Román AR, Bolger TA, Wente SR
(2010) J Biol Chem 285: 16683-92
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Biological Transport, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Glutathione Transferase, Inositol, Kinetics, Models, Biological, Molecular Sequence Data, Nuclear Pore, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Phytic Acid, Protein Binding, Protein Biosynthesis, RNA, Messenger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2014
The unidirectional translocation of messenger RNA (mRNA) through the aqueous channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by interactions between soluble mRNA export factors and distinct binding sites on the NPC. At the cytoplasmic side of the NPC, the conserved mRNA export factors Gle1 and inositol hexakisphosphate (IP(6)) play an essential role in mRNA export by activating the ATPase activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5, promoting localized messenger ribonucleoprotein complex remodeling, and ensuring the directionality of the export process. In addition, Dbp5, Gle1, and IP(6) are also required for proper translation termination. However, the specificity of the IP(6)-Gle1 interaction in vivo is unknown. Here, we characterize the biochemical interaction between Gle1 and IP(6) and the relationship to Dbp5 binding and stimulation. We identify Gle1 residues required for IP(6) binding and show that these residues are needed for IP(6)-dependent Dbp5 stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Gle1 is the primary target of IP(6) for both mRNA export and translation termination in vivo. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, the IP(6)-binding mutants recapitulate all of the mRNA export and translation termination defects found in mutants depleted of IP(6). We conclude that Gle1 specifically binds IP(6) and that this interaction is required for the full potentiation of Dbp5 ATPase activity during both mRNA export and translation termination.
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1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Structure-function analysis of inositol hexakisphosphate-induced autoprocessing in Clostridium difficile toxin A.
Pruitt RN, Chagot B, Cover M, Chazin WJ, Spiller B, Lacy DB
(2009) J Biol Chem 284: 21934-40
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Toxins, Catalytic Domain, Cations, Clostridium difficile, Crystallography, X-Ray, Enterotoxins, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Models, Biological, Models, Molecular, Molecular Conformation, Phytic Acid, Point Mutation, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Spectrophotometry, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 7, 2013
The action of Clostridium difficile toxins A and B depends on inactivation of host small G-proteins by glucosylation. Cellular inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) induces an autocatalytic cleavage of the toxins, releasing an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain into the host cell cytosol. We have defined the cysteine protease domain (CPD) responsible for autoprocessing within toxin A (TcdA) and report the 1.6 A x-ray crystal structure of the domain bound to InsP6. InsP6 is bound in a highly basic pocket that is separated from an unusual active site by a beta-flap structure. Functional studies confirm an intramolecular mechanism of cleavage and highlight specific residues required for InsP6-induced TcdA processing. Analysis of the structural and functional data in the context of sequences from similar and diverse origins highlights a C-terminal extension and a pi-cation interaction within the beta-flap that appear to be unique among the large clostridial cytotoxins.
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3 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Dual functions for the Schizosaccharomyces pombe inositol kinase Ipk1 in nuclear mRNA export and polarized cell growth.
Sarmah B, Wente SR
(2009) Eukaryot Cell 8: 134-46
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Cell Nucleus, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Endocytosis, Mutation, Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor), Phytic Acid, Protein Structure, Tertiary, RNA Transport, RNA, Messenger, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2014
The inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate (IP(5)) 2-kinase (Ipk1) catalyzes the production of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP(6)) in eukaryotic cells. Previous studies have shown that IP(6) is required for efficient nuclear mRNA export in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report the first functional analysis of ipk1(+) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. S. pombe Ipk1 (SpIpk1) is unique among Ipk1 orthologues in that it harbors a novel amino (N)-terminal domain with coiled-coil structural motifs similar to those of BAR (Bin-amphiphysin-Rvs) domain proteins. Mutants with ipk1(+) deleted (ipk1Delta) had mRNA export defects as well as pleiotropic defects in polarized growth, cell morphology, endocytosis, and cell separation. The SpIpk1 catalytic carboxy-terminal domain was required to rescue these defects, and the mRNA export block was genetically linked to SpDbp5 function and, likely, IP(6) production. However, the overexpression of the N-terminal domain alone also inhibited these functions in wild-type cells. This revealed a distinct noncatalytic function for the N-terminal domain. To test for connections with other inositol polyphosphates, we also analyzed whether the loss of asp1(+) function, encoding an IP(6) kinase downstream of Ipk1, had an effect on ipk1Delta cells. The asp1Delta mutant alone did not block mRNA export, and its cell morphology, polarized growth, and endocytosis defects were less severe than those of ipk1Delta cells. Moreover, ipk1Delta asp1Delta double mutants had altered inositol polyphosphate levels distinct from those of the ipk1Delta mutant. This suggested novel roles for asp1(+) upstream of ipk1(+). We propose that IP(6) production is a key signaling linchpin for regulating multiple essential cellular processes.
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12 MeSH Terms