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Tyrosine Kinase Signaling in Clear Cell and Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Revealed by Mass Spectrometry-Based Phosphotyrosine Proteomics.
Haake SM, Li J, Bai Y, Kinose F, Fang B, Welsh EA, Zent R, Dhillon J, Pow-Sang JM, Chen YA, Koomen JM, Rathmell WK, Fishman M, Haura EB
(2016) Clin Cancer Res 22: 5605-5616
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Papillary, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Survival, ErbB Receptors, Extracellular Matrix, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Mass Spectrometry, Phosphorylation, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Proteomics, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Signal Transduction, Tyrosine
Show Abstract · Added August 8, 2016
PURPOSE - Targeted therapies in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are limited by acquired resistance. Novel therapeutic targets are needed to combat resistance and, ideally, target the unique biology of RCC subtypes.
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN - Tyrosine kinases provide critical oncogenic signaling and their inhibition has significantly impacted cancer care. To describe a landscape of tyrosine kinase activity in RCC that could inform novel therapeutic strategies, we performed a mass spectrometry-based system-wide survey of tyrosine phosphorylation in 10 RCC cell lines as well as 15 clear cell and 15 papillary RCC human tumors. To prioritize identified tyrosine kinases for further analysis, a 63 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) drug screen was performed.
RESULTS - Among the cell lines, 28 unique tyrosine phosphosites were identified across 19 kinases and phosphatases including EGFR, MET, JAK2, and FAK in nearly all samples. Multiple FAK TKIs decreased cell viability by at least 50% and inhibited RCC cell line adhesion, invasion, and proliferation. Among the tumors, 49 unique tyrosine phosphosites were identified across 44 kinases and phosphatases. FAK pY576/7 was found in all tumors and many cell lines, whereas DDR1 pY792/6 was preferentially enriched in the papillary RCC tumors. Both tyrosine kinases are capable of transmitting signals from the extracellular matrix and emerged as novel RCC therapeutic targets.
CONCLUSIONS - Tyrosine kinase profiling informs novel therapeutic strategies in RCC and highlights the unique biology among kidney cancer subtypes. Clin Cancer Res; 22(22); 5605-16. ©2016 AACR.
©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Phosphotyrosine signaling analysis in human tumors is confounded by systemic ischemia-driven artifacts and intra-specimen heterogeneity.
Gajadhar AS, Johnson H, Slebos RJ, Shaddox K, Wiles K, Washington MK, Herline AJ, Levine DA, Liebler DC, White FM, Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium
(2015) Cancer Res 75: 1495-503
MeSH Terms: Artifacts, Cell Hypoxia, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Ovarian Neoplasms, Phosphorylation, Phosphotyrosine, Prospective Studies, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Tumor protein phosphorylation analysis may provide insight into intracellular signaling networks underlying tumor behavior, revealing diagnostic, prognostic or therapeutic information. Human tumors collected by The Cancer Genome Atlas program potentially offer the opportunity to characterize activated networks driving tumor progression, in parallel with the genetic and transcriptional landscape already documented for these tumors. However, a critical question is whether cellular signaling networks can be reliably analyzed in surgical specimens, where freezing delays and spatial sampling disparities may potentially obscure physiologic signaling. To quantify the extent of these effects, we analyzed the stability of phosphotyrosine (pTyr) sites in ovarian and colon tumors collected under conditions of controlled ischemia and in the context of defined intratumoral sampling. Cold-ischemia produced a rapid, unpredictable, and widespread impact on tumor pTyr networks within 5 minutes of resection, altering up to 50% of pTyr sites by more than 2-fold. Effects on adhesion and migration, inflammatory response, proliferation, and stress response pathways were recapitulated in both ovarian and colon tumors. In addition, sampling of spatially distinct colon tumor biopsies revealed pTyr differences as dramatic as those associated with ischemic times, despite uniform protein expression profiles. Moreover, intratumoral spatial heterogeneity and pTyr dynamic response to ischemia varied dramatically between tumors collected from different patients. Overall, these findings reveal unforeseen phosphorylation complexity, thereby increasing the difficulty of extracting physiologically relevant pTyr signaling networks from archived tissue specimens. In light of this data, prospective tumor pTyr analysis will require appropriate sampling and collection protocols to preserve in vivo signaling features.
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Global phosphotyrosine proteomics identifies PKCδ as a marker of responsiveness to Src inhibition in colorectal cancer.
McKinley ET, Liu H, McDonald WH, Luo W, Zhao P, Coffey RJ, Hanks SK, Manning HC
(2013) PLoS One 8: e80207
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, CD, Biomarkers, Tumor, Caco-2 Cells, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Line, Tumor, Colorectal Neoplasms, Dasatinib, HCT116 Cells, Humans, Mice, Mice, Nude, Neoplasm Proteins, Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-Trisphosphate 5-Phosphatases, Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Kinase C-delta, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Proteome, Proteomics, Pyrimidines, Receptor-Like Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Class 5, Thiazoles, src-Family Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Sensitive and specific biomarkers of protein kinase inhibition can be leveraged to accelerate drug development studies in oncology by associating early molecular responses with target inhibition. In this study, we utilized unbiased shotgun phosphotyrosine (pY) proteomics to discover novel biomarkers of response to dasatinib, a small molecule Src-selective inhibitor, in preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed unbiased mass spectrometry shotgun pY proteomics to reveal the pY proteome of cultured HCT-116 colonic carcinoma cells, and then extended this analysis to HCT-116 xenograft tumors to identify pY biomarkers of dasatinib-responsiveness in vivo. Major dasatinib-responsive pY sites in xenograft tumors included sites on delta-type protein kinase C (PKCδ), CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1), Type-II SH2-domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP2), and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPα). The pY313 site PKCδ was further supported as a relevant biomarker of dasatinib-mediated Src inhibition in HCT-116 xenografts by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antibody. Reduction of PKCδ pY313 was further correlated with dasatinib-mediated inhibition of Src and diminished growth as spheroids of a panel of human CRC cell lines. These studies reveal PKCδ pY313 as a promising readout of Src inhibition in CRC and potentially other solid tumors and may reflect responsiveness to dasatinib in a subset of colorectal cancers.
1 Communities
5 Members
0 Resources
24 MeSH Terms
Role of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 in the mechanism of endorepellin angiostatic activity.
Nyström A, Shaik ZP, Gullberg D, Krieg T, Eckes B, Zent R, Pozzi A, Iozzo RV
(2009) Blood 114: 4897-906
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinoma, Lewis Lung, Cell Adhesion, Endothelium, Vascular, Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans, Humans, Integrin alpha1, Integrin alpha2beta1, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Neovascularization, Physiologic, Peptide Fragments, Phosphorylation, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Interaction Mapping, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 6, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added February 24, 2014
Endorepellin, the C-terminal domain of perlecan, is a powerful angiogenesis inhibitor. To dissect the mechanism of endorepellin-mediated endothelial silencing, we used an antibody array against multiple tyrosine kinase receptors. Endorepellin caused a widespread reduction in phosphorylation of key receptors involved in angiogenesis and a concurrent increase in phosphatase activity in endothelial cells and tumor xenografts. These effects were efficiently hampered by function-blocking antibodies against integrin alpha2beta1, the functional endorepellin receptor. The Src homology-2 protein phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) coprecipitated with integrin alpha2 and was phosphorylated in a dynamic fashion after endorepellin stimulation. Genetic evidence was provided by lack of an endorepellin-evoked phosphatase response in microvascular endothelial cells derived from integrin alpha2beta1(-/-) mice and by response to endorepellin in cells genetically engineered to express the alpha2beta1 integrin, but not in cells either lacking this receptor or expressing a chimera harboring the integrin alpha2 ectodomain fused to the alpha1 intracellular domain. siRNA-mediated knockdown of integrin alpha2 caused a dose-dependent reduction of SHP-1. Finally, the levels of SHP-1 and its enzymatic activity were substantially reduced in multiple organs from alpha2beta1(-/-) mice. Our results show that SHP-1 is an essential mediator of endorepellin activity and discover a novel functional interaction between the integrin alpha2 subunit and SHP-1.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Focal adhesion kinase modulates cell adhesion strengthening via integrin activation.
Michael KE, Dumbauld DW, Burns KL, Hanks SK, García AJ
(2009) Mol Biol Cell 20: 2508-19
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomechanical Phenomena, Cell Adhesion, Fibroblasts, Fibronectins, Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Humans, Integrin alpha5beta1, Integrins, Kinetics, Mice, Phosphorylation, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Binding, Solubility, Talin, Tetracycline, Vinculin
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase regulating cell migration, adhesive signaling, and mechanosensing. Using FAK-null cells expressing FAK under an inducible promoter, we demonstrate that FAK regulates the time-dependent generation of adhesive forces. During the early stages of adhesion, FAK expression in FAK-null cells enhances integrin activation to promote integrin binding and, hence, the adhesion strengthening rate. Importantly, FAK expression regulated integrin activation, and talin was required for the FAK-dependent effects. A role for FAK in integrin activation was confirmed in human fibroblasts with knocked-down FAK expression. The FAK autophosphorylation Y397 site was required for the enhancements in adhesion strengthening and integrin-binding responses. This work demonstrates a novel role for FAK in integrin activation and the time-dependent generation of cell-ECM forces.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Global impact of oncogenic Src on a phosphotyrosine proteome.
Luo W, Slebos RJ, Hill S, Li M, Brábek J, Amanchy R, Chaerkady R, Pandey A, Ham AJ, Hanks SK
(2008) J Proteome Res 7: 3447-60
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Biomarkers, Cell Line, Transformed, Chromatography, Liquid, Fibroblasts, Genes, src, In Vitro Techniques, Isotope Labeling, Mice, Molecular Sequence Data, Phosphotyrosine, Proteome, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, src-Family Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Elevated activity of Src, the first characterized protein-tyrosine kinase, is associated with progression of many human cancers, and Src has attracted interest as a therapeutic target. Src is known to act in various receptor signaling systems to impact cell behavior, yet it remains likely that the spectrum of Src protein substrates relevant to cancer is incompletely understood. To better understand the cellular impact of deregulated Src kinase activity, we extensively applied a mass spectrometry shotgun phosphotyrosine (pTyr) proteomics strategy to obtain global pTyr profiles of Src-transformed mouse fibroblasts as well as their nontransformed counterparts. A total of 867 peptides representing 563 distinct pTyr sites on 374 different proteins were identified from the Src-transformed cells, while 514 peptides representing 275 pTyr sites on 167 proteins were identified from nontransformed cells. Distinct characteristics of the two profiles were revealed by spectral counting, indicative of pTyr site relative abundance, and by complementary quantitative analysis using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). While both pTyr profiles are replete with sites on signaling and adhesion/cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, the Src-transformed profile is more diverse with enrichment in sites on metabolic enzymes and RNA and protein synthesis and processing machinery. Forty-three pTyr sites (32 proteins) are predicted as major biologically relevant Src targets on the basis of frequent identification in both cell populations. This select group, of particular interest as diagnostic biomarkers, includes well-established Src sites on signaling/adhesion/cytoskeletal proteins, but also uncharacterized sites of potential relevance to the transformed cell phenotype.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
A Rictor-Myo1c complex participates in dynamic cortical actin events in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.
Hagan GN, Lin Y, Magnuson MA, Avruch J, Czech MP
(2008) Mol Cell Biol 28: 4215-26
MeSH Terms: 3T3-L1 Cells, Actins, Adipocytes, Animals, Carrier Proteins, Cell Membrane Structures, Cells, Cultured, Enzyme Activation, Fibroblasts, Humans, Immunoprecipitation, Insulin, Mice, Myosin Type I, Myosins, Paxillin, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Binding, Protein Kinases, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Rapamycin-Insensitive Companion of mTOR Protein, Sirolimus, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added August 22, 2011
Insulin signaling through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activates the protein kinase Akt through phosphorylation of its threonine 308 and serine 473 residues by the PDK1 protein kinase and the Rictor-mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC2), respectively. Remarkably, we show here that the Rictor protein is also present in cultured adipocytes in complexes containing Myo1c, a molecular motor that promotes cortical actin remodeling. Interestingly, the Rictor-Myo1c complex is biochemically distinct from the previously reported mTORC2 and can be immunoprecipitated independently of mTORC2. Furthermore, while RNA interference-directed silencing of Rictor results in the expected attenuation of Akt phosphorylation at serine 473, depletion of Myo1c is without effect. In contrast, loss of either Rictor or Myo1c inhibits phosphorylation of the actin filament regulatory protein paxillin at tyrosine 118. Furthermore, Myo1c-induced membrane ruffling of 3T3-L1 adipocytes is also compromised following Rictor knockdown. Interestingly, neither the mTORC2 inhibitor rapamycin nor the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin affects paxillin tyrosine 118 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the Rictor-Myo1c complex is distinct from mTORC2 and that Myo1c, in conjunction with Rictor, participates in cortical actin remodeling events.
3 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
25 MeSH Terms
The integrin-coupled signaling adaptor p130Cas suppresses Smad3 function in transforming growth factor-beta signaling.
Kim W, Seok Kang Y, Soo Kim J, Shin NY, Hanks SK, Song WK
(2008) Mol Biol Cell 19: 2135-46
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Cycle, Cell Nucleus, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Crk-Associated Substrate Protein, Extracellular Matrix, Humans, Integrins, Mice, Phosphorylation, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Binding, Protein Transport, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Signal Transduction, Smad3 Protein, Transcription, Genetic, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Reciprocal cooperative signaling by integrins and growth factor receptors at G1 phase during cell cycle progression is well documented. By contrast, little is known about the cross-talk between integrin and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta signaling. Here, we show that integrin signaling counteracts the inhibitory effects of TGF-beta on cell growth and that this effect is mediated by p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate, 130 kDa). Adhesion to fibronectin or laminin reduces TGF-beta-induced Smad3 phosphorylation and thus inhibits TGF-beta-mediated growth arrest; loss of p130Cas abrogates these effects. Loss and gain of function studies demonstrated that, once tyrosine-phosphorylated via integrin signaling, p130Cas binds to Smad3 and reduces phosphorylation of Smad3. That in turn leads to inhibition of p15 and p21 expression and facilitation of cell cycle progression. Thus, p130Cas-mediated control of TGF-beta/Smad signaling may provide an additional clue to the mechanism underlying resistance to TGF-beta-induced growth inhibition.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Requirement of Nck adaptors for actin dynamics and cell migration stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor B.
Rivera GM, Antoku S, Gelkop S, Shin NY, Hanks SK, Pawson T, Mayer BJ
(2006) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103: 9536-41
MeSH Terms: Actins, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Membrane, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Crk-Associated Substrate Protein, Cytoskeleton, Gene Expression Regulation, Mice, Oncogene Proteins, Phosphotyrosine, Protein Binding, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis, Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
The Nck family of Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 domain adaptors functions to link tyrosine phosphorylation induced by extracellular signals with downstream regulators of actin dynamics. We investigated the role of mammalian Nck adaptors in signaling from the activated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor (PDGFbetaR) to the actin cytoskeleton. We report here that Nck adaptors are required for cytoskeletal reorganization and chemotaxis stimulated by PDGF-B. Analysis of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins demonstrated that Crk-associated substrate (p130(Cas)), not the activated PDGFbetaR itself, is the major Nck SH2 domain-binding protein in PDGF-B-stimulated cells. Both Nck- and p130(Cas)-deficient cells fail to display cytoskeletal rearrangements, including the formation of membrane ruffles and the disassembly of actin bundles, typically shown by their WT counterparts in response to PDGF-B. Furthermore, Nck and p130(Cas) colocalize in phosphotyrosine-enriched membrane ruffles induced by PDGF-B in NIH 3T3 cells. These results suggest that Nck adaptors play an essential role in linking the activated PDGFbetaR with actin dynamics through a pathway that involves p130(Cas).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Role of beta-arrestin 1 in the metastatic progression of colorectal cancer.
Buchanan FG, Gorden DL, Matta P, Shi Q, Matrisian LM, DuBois RN
(2006) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103: 1492-7
MeSH Terms: Arrestins, Blotting, Western, CSK Tyrosine-Protein Kinase, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Membrane, Cell Movement, Collagen, Colorectal Neoplasms, Cytosol, Densitometry, Dinoprostone, Disease Progression, Drug Combinations, ErbB Receptors, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Immunoprecipitation, Laminin, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Models, Biological, Neoplasm Metastasis, Phosphotyrosine, Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Proteoglycans, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Time Factors, Transcriptional Activation, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestins, src-Family Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
G protein-coupled receptor ligand-dependent transactivation of growth factor receptors has been implicated in human cancer cell proliferation, migration, and cell survival. For example, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-induced transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in colorectal carcinoma cells is mediated by means of a c-Src-dependent mechanism and regulates cell proliferation and migration. Recent evidence indicates that beta-arrestin 1 may act as an important mediator in G protein-coupled receptor-induced activation of c-Src. Whether beta-arrestin 1 serves a functional role in these events is, however, unknown. We investigated the effects of PGE(2) on colorectal cancer cells expressing WT and mutant beta-arrestin 1. Here we report that PGE(2) induces the association of a prostaglandin E receptor 4/beta-arrestin 1/c-Src signaling complex resulting in the transactivation of the EGFR and downstream Akt (PKB) signaling. The interaction of beta-arrestin 1 and c-Src is critical for the regulation of colorectal carcinoma cell migration in vitro as well as metastatic spread of disease to the liver in vivo. These results show that the prostaglandin E/beta-arrestin 1/c-Src signaling complex is a crucial step in PGE(2)-mediated transactivation of the EGFR and may play a pivotal role in tumor metastasis. Furthermore, our data implicate a functional role for beta-arrestin 1 as a mediator of cellular migration and metastasis.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
32 MeSH Terms