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Differential Expression of NF2 in Neuroepithelial Compartments Is Necessary for Mammalian Eye Development.
Moon KH, Kim HT, Lee D, Rao MB, Levine EM, Lim DS, Kim JW
(2018) Dev Cell 44: 13-28.e3
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Lineage, Cell Polarity, Cells, Cultured, Cilia, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Humans, Hyperplasia, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neural Stem Cells, Neurofibromin 2, Organogenesis, Phenotype, Phosphoproteins, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Retinal Pigment Epithelium, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 14, 2018
The optic neuroepithelial continuum of vertebrate eye develops into three differentially growing compartments: the retina, the ciliary margin (CM), and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Neurofibromin 2 (Nf2) is strongly expressed in slowly expanding RPE and CM compartments, and the loss of mouse Nf2 causes hyperplasia in these compartments, replicating the ocular abnormalities seen in human NF2 patients. The hyperplastic ocular phenotypes were largely suppressed by heterozygous deletion of Yap and Taz, key targets of the Nf2-Hippo signaling pathway. We also found that, in addition to feedback transcriptional regulation of Nf2 by Yap/Taz in the CM, activation of Nf2 expression by Mitf in the RPE and suppression by Sox2 in retinal progenitor cells are necessary for the differential growth of the corresponding cell populations. Together, our findings reveal that Nf2 is a key player that orchestrates the differential growth of optic neuroepithelial compartments during vertebrate eye development.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
The receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 promotes glutamine metabolism in tumors by activating the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ.
Edwards DN, Ngwa VM, Wang S, Shiuan E, Brantley-Sieders DM, Kim LC, Reynolds AB, Chen J
(2017) Sci Signal 10:
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Amino Acid Transport System ASC, Animals, Biomarkers, Tumor, Breast Neoplasms, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Ephrin-A2, Female, Glutaminase, Glutamine, Humans, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Minor Histocompatibility Antigens, Muscle Proteins, Phosphoproteins, Transcription Factors, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Malignant tumors reprogram cellular metabolism to support cancer cell proliferation and survival. Although most cancers depend on a high rate of aerobic glycolysis, many cancer cells also display addiction to glutamine. Glutamine transporters and glutaminase activity are critical for glutamine metabolism in tumor cells. We found that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA2 activated the TEAD family transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ (YAP/TAZ), likely in a ligand-independent manner, to promote glutamine metabolism in cells and mouse models of HER2-positive breast cancer. Overexpression of EphA2 induced the nuclear accumulation of YAP and TAZ and increased the expression of YAP/TAZ target genes. Inhibition of the GTPase Rho or the kinase ROCK abolished EphA2-dependent YAP/TAZ nuclear localization. Silencing or substantially reduced the amount of intracellular glutamate through decreased expression of and , respectively, genes that encode proteins that promote glutamine uptake and metabolism. The regulatory DNA elements of both and contain TEAD binding sites and were bound by TEAD4 in an EphA2-dependent manner. In patient breast cancer tissues, expression positively correlated with that of and , as well as that of and Although high expression of predicted enhanced metastatic potential and poor patient survival, it also rendered HER2-positive breast cancer cells more sensitive to glutaminase inhibition. The findings define a previously unknown mechanism of EphA2-mediated glutaminolysis through YAP/TAZ activation in HER2-positive breast cancer and identify potential therapeutic targets in patients.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
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RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance.
Liu M, Zhang Z, Sampson L, Zhou X, Nalapareddy K, Feng Y, Akunuru S, Melendez J, Davis AK, Bi F, Geiger H, Xin M, Zheng Y
(2017) Stem Cell Reports 9: 1961-1975
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Epiregulin, Epithelium, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Intestine, Small, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Morphogenesis, Phosphoproteins, Stem Cells, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin, rho GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2018
RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG) expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A) mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnb mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
The C-terminal region of A-kinase anchor protein 350 (AKAP350A) enables formation of microtubule-nucleation centers and interacts with pericentriolar proteins.
Kolobova E, Roland JT, Lapierre LA, Williams JA, Mason TA, Goldenring JR
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 20394-20409
MeSH Terms: A Kinase Anchor Proteins, Biomarkers, Cell Line, Centrosome, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Luminescent Proteins, Microscopy, Electron, Transmission, Microtubule-Associated Proteins, Microtubule-Organizing Center, Models, Molecular, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Peptide Fragments, Phosphoproteins, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Interaction Mapping, Protein Multimerization, Proteomics, RNA Interference, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Recombinant Proteins, Two-Hybrid System Techniques
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Microtubules in animal cells assemble (nucleate) from both the centrosome and the cis-Golgi cisternae. A-kinase anchor protein 350 kDa (AKAP350A, also called AKAP450/CG-NAP/AKAP9) is a large scaffolding protein located at both the centrosome and Golgi apparatus. Previous findings have suggested that AKAP350 is important for microtubule dynamics at both locations, but how this scaffolding protein assembles microtubule nucleation machinery is unclear. Here, we found that overexpression of the C-terminal third of AKAP350A, enhanced GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907), induces the formation of multiple microtubule-nucleation centers (MTNCs). Nevertheless, these induced MTNCs lacked "true" centriole proteins, such as Cep135. Mapping analysis with AKAP350A truncations demonstrated that AKAP350A contains discrete regions responsible for promoting or inhibiting the formation of multiple MTNCs. Moreover, GFP-AKAP350A(2691-3907) recruited several pericentriolar proteins to MTNCs, including γ-tubulin, pericentrin, Cep68, Cep170, and Cdk5RAP2. Proteomic analysis indicated that Cdk5RAP2 and Cep170 both interact with the microtubule nucleation-promoting region of AKAP350A, whereas Cep68 interacts with the distal C-terminal AKAP350A region. Yeast two-hybrid assays established a direct interaction of Cep170 with AKAP350A. Super-resolution and deconvolution microscopy analyses were performed to define the association of AKAP350A with centrosomes, and these studies disclosed that AKAP350A spans the bridge between centrioles, co-localizing with rootletin and Cep68 in the linker region. siRNA-mediated depletion of AKAP350A caused displacement of both Cep68 and Cep170 from the centrosome. These results suggest that AKAP350A acts as a scaffold for factors involved in microtubule nucleation at the centrosome and coordinates the assembly of protein complexes associating with the intercentriolar bridge.
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Distinct patterns of B-cell receptor signaling in non-Hodgkin lymphomas identified by single-cell profiling.
Myklebust JH, Brody J, Kohrt HE, Kolstad A, Czerwinski DK, Wälchli S, Green MR, Trøen G, Liestøl K, Beiske K, Houot R, Delabie J, Alizadeh AA, Irish JM, Levy R
(2017) Blood 129: 759-770
MeSH Terms: Agammaglobulinaemia Tyrosine Kinase, CD79 Antigens, Diagnosis, Differential, Flow Cytometry, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Immunoglobulin M, Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell, Lymphoma, Follicular, Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse, Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3, Phospholipase C gamma, Phosphoproteins, Phosphorylation, Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, STAT1 Transcription Factor, STAT5 Transcription Factor, Signal Transduction, Single-Cell Analysis, Syk Kinase, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, src-Family Kinases
Show Abstract · Added December 31, 2016
Kinases downstream of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) represent attractive targets for therapy in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). As clinical responses vary, improved knowledge regarding activation and regulation of BCR signaling in individual patients is needed. Here, using phosphospecific flow cytometry to obtain malignant B-cell signaling profiles from 95 patients representing 4 types of NHL revealed a striking contrast between chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) tumors. Lymphoma cells from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients had high basal phosphorylation levels of most measured signaling nodes, whereas follicular lymphoma cells represented the opposite pattern with no or very low basal levels. MCL showed large interpatient variability in basal levels, and elevated levels for the phosphorylated forms of AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, STAT1, and STAT5 were associated with poor outcome. CLL tumors had elevated basal levels for the phosphorylated forms of BCR-signaling nodes (Src family tyrosine kinase, spleen tyrosine kinase [SYK], phospholipase Cγ), but had low α-BCR-induced signaling. This contrasted MCL tumors, where α-BCR-induced signaling was variable, but significantly potentiated as compared with the other types. Overexpression of CD79B, combined with a gating strategy whereby signaling output was directly quantified per cell as a function of CD79B levels, confirmed a direct relationship between surface CD79B, immunoglobulin M (IgM), and IgM-induced signaling levels. Furthermore, α-BCR-induced signaling strength was variable across patient samples and correlated with BCR subunit CD79B expression, but was inversely correlated with susceptibility to Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) and SYK inhibitors in MCL. These individual differences in BCR levels and signaling might relate to differences in therapy responses to BCR-pathway inhibitors.
© 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.
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26 MeSH Terms
Vascular stiffness mechanoactivates YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis to drive pulmonary hypertension.
Bertero T, Oldham WM, Cottrill KA, Pisano S, Vanderpool RR, Yu Q, Zhao J, Tai Y, Tang Y, Zhang YY, Rehman S, Sugahara M, Qi Z, Gorcsan J, Vargas SO, Saggar R, Saggar R, Wallace WD, Ross DJ, Haley KJ, Waxman AB, Parikh VN, De Marco T, Hsue PY, Morris A, Simon MA, Norris KA, Gaggioli C, Loscalzo J, Fessel J, Chan SY
(2016) J Clin Invest 126: 3313-35
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Animals, Child, Collagen, Endothelial Cells, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Glutamic Acid, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Infant, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Male, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Middle Aged, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Phosphoproteins, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Vascular Stiffness, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 16, 2016
Dysregulation of vascular stiffness and cellular metabolism occurs early in pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the mechanisms by which biophysical properties of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) relate to metabolic processes important in PH remain undefined. In this work, we examined cultured pulmonary vascular cells and various types of PH-diseased lung tissue and determined that ECM stiffening resulted in mechanoactivation of the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ (WWTR1). YAP/TAZ activation modulated metabolic enzymes, including glutaminase (GLS1), to coordinate glutaminolysis and glycolysis. Glutaminolysis, an anaplerotic pathway, replenished aspartate for anabolic biosynthesis, which was critical for sustaining proliferation and migration within stiff ECM. In vitro, GLS1 inhibition blocked aspartate production and reprogrammed cellular proliferation pathways, while application of aspartate restored proliferation. In the monocrotaline rat model of PH, pharmacologic modulation of pulmonary vascular stiffness and YAP-dependent mechanotransduction altered glutaminolysis, pulmonary vascular proliferation, and manifestations of PH. Additionally, pharmacologic targeting of GLS1 in this model ameliorated disease progression. Notably, evaluation of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected nonhuman primates and HIV-infected subjects revealed a correlation between YAP/TAZ-GLS activation and PH. These results indicate that ECM stiffening sustains vascular cell growth and migration through YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis and anaplerosis, and thereby link mechanical stimuli to dysregulated vascular metabolism. Furthermore, this study identifies potential metabolic drug targets for therapeutic development in PH.
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23 MeSH Terms
The Gene Expression Status of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Pathway in Gastric Cancer Tissues and Cell Lines.
Riquelme I, Tapia O, Espinoza JA, Leal P, Buchegger K, Sandoval A, Bizama C, Araya JC, Peek RM, Roa JC
(2016) Pathol Oncol Res 22: 797-805
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Cell Line, Tumor, Class I Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Gene Expression, Humans, PTEN Phosphohydrolase, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphoproteins, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa, Signal Transduction, Stomach Neoplasms, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway plays a crucial role in the regulation of multiple cellular functions including cell growth, proliferation, metabolism and angiogenesis. Emerging evidence has shown that deregulation of this pathway has a role promoting gastric cancer (GC). The aim was to assess the expression of genes involved in this pathway by qPCR in 23 tumor and 23 non-tumor gastric mucosa samples from advanced GC patients, and in AGS, MKN28 and MKN45 gastric cancer cell lines. Results showed a slight overexpression of PIK3CA, PIK3CB, AKT1, MTOR, RPS6KB1, EIF4EBP1 and EIF4E genes, and a slightly decreased PTEN and TSC1 expression. In AGS, MKN28 and MKN45 cells a significant gene overexpression of PIK3CA, PIK3CB, AKT1, MTOR, RPS6KB1 and EIF4E, and a significant repression of PTEN gene expression were observed. Immunoblotting showed that PI3K-β, AKT, p-AKT, PTEN, mTOR, p-mTOR, P70S6K1, p-P70S6K1, 4E-BP1, p-4E-BP1, eIF4E and p-eIF4E proteins were present in cell lines at different levels, confirming activation of this pathway in vitro. This is the first time this extensive panel of 9 genes within PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been studied in GC to clarify the biological role of this pathway in GC and develop new strategies for this malignancy.
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13 MeSH Terms
Comparative analysis of the GNAQ, GNA11, SF3B1, and EIF1AX driver mutations in melanoma and across the cancer spectrum.
Johnson DB, Roszik J, Shoushtari AN, Eroglu Z, Balko JM, Higham C, Puzanov I, Patel SP, Sosman JA, Woodman SE
(2016) Pigment Cell Melanoma Res 29: 470-3
MeSH Terms: Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-1, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gq-G11, Genes, Neoplasm, Humans, Immunotherapy, Melanoma, Mutation, Mutation, Missense, Neoplasms, Phosphoproteins, Point Mutation, Prognosis, RNA Splicing Factors
Added April 6, 2017
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14 MeSH Terms
p73 Is Required for Multiciliogenesis and Regulates the Foxj1-Associated Gene Network.
Marshall CB, Mays DJ, Beeler JS, Rosenbluth JM, Boyd KL, Santos Guasch GL, Shaver TM, Tang LJ, Liu Q, Shyr Y, Venters BJ, Magnuson MA, Pietenpol JA
(2016) Cell Rep 14: 2289-300
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bronchioles, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Cilia, Epithelial Cells, Epithelium, Female, Forkhead Transcription Factors, Gene Regulatory Networks, Lung, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Phosphoproteins, RNA Interference, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Trachea, Trans-Activators, Transcriptome, Tumor Protein p73
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2016
We report that p73 is expressed in multiciliated cells (MCCs), is required for MCC differentiation, and directly regulates transcriptional modulators of multiciliogenesis. Loss of ciliary biogenesis provides a unifying mechanism for many phenotypes observed in p73 knockout mice including hydrocephalus; hippocampal dysgenesis; sterility; and chronic inflammation/infection of lung, middle ear, and sinus. Through p73 and p63 ChIP-seq using murine tracheal cells, we identified over 100 putative p73 target genes that regulate MCC differentiation and homeostasis. We validated Foxj1, a transcriptional regulator of multiciliogenesis, and many other cilia-associated genes as direct target genes of p73 and p63. We show p73 and p63 are co-expressed in a subset of basal cells and suggest that p73 marks these cells for MCC differentiation. In summary, p73 is essential for MCC differentiation, functions as a critical regulator of a transcriptome required for MCC differentiation, and, like p63, has an essential role in development of tissues.
Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Opposing roles of LTB4 and PGE2 in regulating the inflammasome-dependent scorpion venom-induced mortality.
Zoccal KF, Sorgi CA, Hori JI, Paula-Silva FW, Arantes EC, Serezani CH, Zamboni DS, Faccioli LH
(2016) Nat Commun 7: 10760
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase, Blotting, Western, Carrier Proteins, Celecoxib, Cyclic AMP, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors, Dinoprostone, In Vitro Techniques, Indoles, Indomethacin, Inflammasomes, Interleukin-1beta, Leukotriene B4, Lipoxygenase Inhibitors, Macrophages, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Mice, Mice, Knockout, NF-kappa B, NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein, Phosphoproteins, Prostaglandin Antagonists, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP2 Subtype, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Scorpion Stings, Scorpion Venoms, Scorpions, Xanthones
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
Tityus serrulatus sting causes thousands of deaths annually worldwide. T. serrulatus-envenomed victims exhibit local or systemic reaction that culminates in pulmonary oedema, potentially leading to death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying T. serrulatus venom (TsV) activity remain unknown. Here we show that TsV triggers NLRP3 inflammasome activation via K(+) efflux. Mechanistically, TsV triggers lung-resident cells to release PGE2, which induces IL-1β production via E prostanoid receptor 2/4-cAMP-PKA-NFκB-dependent mechanisms. IL-1β/IL-1R actions account for oedema and neutrophil recruitment to the lungs, leading to TsV-induced mortality. Inflammasome activation triggers LTB4 production and further PGE2 via IL-1β/IL-1R signalling. Activation of LTB4-BLT1/2 pathway decreases cAMP generation, controlling TsV-induced inflammation. Exogenous administration confirms LTB4 anti-inflammatory activity and abrogates TsV-induced mortality. These results suggest that the balance between LTB4 and PGE2 determines the amount of IL-1β inflammasome-dependent release and the outcome of envenomation. We suggest COX1/2 inhibition as an effective therapeutic intervention for scorpion envenomation.
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31 MeSH Terms