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Combining Salt Doping and Matrix Sublimation for High Spatial Resolution MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Neutral Lipids.
Dufresne M, Patterson NH, Norris JL, Caprioli RM
(2019) Anal Chem 91: 12928-12934
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzoates, Brain, Cerebrosides, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Lipids, Mice, Phospholipids, Sodium Chloride, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2019
The combination of sodium salt doping of a tissue section along with the sublimation of the matrix 2,5-dihydrobenzoic acid (DHB) was found to be an effective coating for the simultaneous detection of neutral lipids and phospholipids using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry in positive ionization mode. Lithium, sodium, and potassium acetate were initially screened for their ability to cationize difficult to analyze neutral lipids such as cholesterol esters, cerebrosides, and triglycerides directly from a tissue section. The combination of sodium salt and DHB sublimation was found to be an effective cation/matrix combination for detection of neutral lipids. Further experimental optimizations revealed that sodium carbonate or sodium phosphate followed by DHB sublimation increases the signal intensity of the neutral lipids studied depending on the specific lipid family and tissue type by 10-fold to 140-fold compared with that of previously published methods. Application of sodium carbonate tissue doping and DHB sublimation resulted in crystal sizes ≤2 μm. We were thus able to image a mouse brain cerebellum at a high spatial resolution and detected 37 cerebrosides in a single run using a MALDI-TOF instrument. The combination of sodium doping and DHB sublimation offer a targeted and sensitive approach for the detection of neutral lipids that do not typically ionize well under normal MALDI conditions.
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10 MeSH Terms
Plasma apoM and S1P levels are inversely associated with mortality in African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Liu M, Frej C, Langefeld CD, Divers J, Bowden DW, Carr JJ, Gebre AK, Xu J, Larsson B, Dahlbäck B, Freedman BI, Parks JS
(2019) J Lipid Res 60: 1425-1431
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Apolipoproteins M, Biomarkers, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Disease-Free Survival, Female, Humans, Lysophospholipids, Male, Middle Aged, Sphingosine, Survival Rate
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
apoM is a minor HDL apolipoprotein and carrier for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). HDL apoM and S1P concentrations are inversely associated with atherosclerosis progression in rodents. We evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of S1P, plasma concentrations of apoM, and HDL apoM levels with prevalent subclinical atherosclerosis and mortality in the African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants (N = 545). Associations between plasma S1P, plasma apoM, and HDL apoM with subclinical atherosclerosis and mortality were assessed using multivariate parametric, nonparametric, and Cox proportional hazards models. At baseline, participants' median (25th percentile, 75th percentile) age was 55 (49, 62) years old and their coronary artery calcium (CAC) mass score was 26.5 (0.0, 346.5). Plasma S1P, plasma apoM, and HDL apoM were not associated with CAC. After 64 (57.6, 70.3) months of follow-up, 81 deaths were recorded. Higher concentrations of plasma S1P [odds ratio (OR) = 0.14, = 0.01] and plasma apoM (OR = 0.10, = 0.02), but not HDL apoM ( = 0.89), were associated with lower mortality after adjusting for age, sex, statin use, CAC, kidney function, and albuminuria. We conclude that plasma S1P and apoM concentrations are inversely and independently associated with mortality, but not CAC, in African Americans with type 2 diabetes after accounting for conventional risk factors.
Copyright © 2019 Liu et al.
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12 MeSH Terms
Lysophospholipases cooperate to mediate lipid homeostasis and lysophospholipid signaling.
Wepy JA, Galligan JJ, Kingsley PJ, Xu S, Goodman MC, Tallman KA, Rouzer CA, Marnett LJ
(2019) J Lipid Res 60: 360-374
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Gene Knockout Techniques, Homeostasis, Humans, Hydrolysis, Lysophospholipids, Models, Molecular, Neurons, Protein Conformation, Signal Transduction, Thiolester Hydrolases
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2019
Lysophospholipids (LysoPLs) are bioactive lipid species involved in cellular signaling processes and the regulation of cell membrane structure. LysoPLs are metabolized through the action of lysophospholipases, including lysophospholipase A1 (LYPLA1) and lysophospholipase A2 (LYPLA2). A new X-ray crystal structure of LYPLA2 compared with a previously published structure of LYPLA1 demonstrated near-identical folding of the two enzymes; however, LYPLA1 and LYPLA2 have displayed distinct substrate specificities in recombinant enzyme assays. To determine how these in vitro substrate preferences translate into a relevant cellular setting and better understand the enzymes' role in LysoPL metabolism, CRISPR-Cas9 technology was utilized to generate stable KOs of and/or in Neuro2a cells. Using these cellular models in combination with a targeted lipidomics approach, LysoPL levels were quantified and compared between cell lines to determine the effect of losing lysophospholipase activity on lipid metabolism. This work suggests that LYPLA1 and LYPLA2 are each able to account for the loss of the other to maintain lipid homeostasis in cells; however, when both are deleted, LysoPL levels are dramatically increased, causing phenotypic and morphological changes to the cells.
Copyright © 2019 Wepy et al.
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13 MeSH Terms
Determining Double Bond Position in Lipids Using Online Ozonolysis Coupled to Liquid Chromatography and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry.
Harris RA, May JC, Stinson CA, Xia Y, McLean JA
(2018) Anal Chem 90: 1915-1924
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chickens, Chromatography, Liquid, Eggs, Fatty Acids, Unsaturated, Glycerophospholipids, Isomerism, Lipids, Ozone, Spectrometry, Mass, Electrospray Ionization
Show Abstract · Added December 17, 2018
The increasing focus on lipid metabolism has revealed a need for analytical techniques capable of structurally characterizing lipids with a high degree of specificity. Lipids can exist as any one of a large number of double bond positional isomers, which are indistinguishable by single-stage mass spectrometry alone. Ozonolysis reactions coupled to mass spectrometry have previously been demonstrated as a means for localizing double bonds in unsaturated lipids. Here we describe an online, solution-phase reactor using ozone produced via a low-pressure mercury lamp, which generates aldehyde products diagnostic of cleavage at a particular double bond position. This flow-cell device is utilized in conjunction with structurally selective ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The lamp-mediated reaction was found to be effective for multiple lipid species in both positive and negative ionization modes, and the conversion efficiency from precursor to product ions was tunable across a wide range (20-95%) by varying the flow rate through the ozonolysis device. Ion mobility separation of the ozonolysis products generated additional structural information and revealed the presence of saturated species in a complex mixture. The method presented here is simple, robust, and readily coupled to existing instrument platforms with minimal modifications necessary. For these reasons, application to standard lipidomic workflows is possible and aids in more comprehensive structural characterization of a myriad of lipid species.
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10 MeSH Terms
Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate lipids in the retinal pigment epithelium implicate lysosomal/endosomal dysfunction in a model of Stargardt disease and human retinas.
Anderson DMG, Ablonczy Z, Koutalos Y, Hanneken AM, Spraggins JM, Calcutt MW, Crouch RK, Caprioli RM, Schey KL
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 17352
MeSH Terms: ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters, Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Endosomes, Humans, Lipids, Lysophospholipids, Lysosomes, Macular Degeneration, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Monoglycerides, Retina, Retinal Pigment Epithelium, Stargardt Disease
Show Abstract · Added March 22, 2018
Stargardt disease is a juvenile onset retinal degeneration, associated with elevated levels of lipofuscin and its bis-retinoid components, such as N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine (A2E). However, the pathogenesis of Stargardt is still poorly understood and targeted treatments are not available. Utilizing high spatial and high mass resolution matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), we determined alterations of lipid profiles specifically localized to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in Abca4 Stargardt model mice compared to their relevant background strain. Extensive analysis by LC-MS/MS in both positive and negative ion mode was required to accurately confirm the identity of one highly expressed lipid class, bis(monoacylgylercoro)phosphate (BMP) lipids, and to distinguish them from isobaric species. The same BMP lipids were also detected in the RPE of healthy human retina. BMP lipids have been previously associated with the endosomal/lysosomal storage diseases Niemann-Pick and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis and have been reported to regulate cholesterol levels in endosomes. These results suggest that perturbations in lipid metabolism associated with late endosomal/lysosomal dysfunction may play a role in the pathogenesis of Stargardt disease and is evidenced in human retinas.
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15 MeSH Terms
Limiting Injury During Saphenous Vein Graft Preparation For Coronary Arterial Bypass Prevents Metabolic Decompensation.
Cheung-Flynn J, Song J, Voskresensky I, Wise ES, Liu Y, Xiong Y, Eagle SS, Brophy CM, Flynn CR
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 14179
MeSH Terms: Animals, Coronary Artery Bypass, Energy Metabolism, Homeostasis, Humans, Hydrolysis, Metabolomics, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Phospholipids, Pressure, Saphenous Vein, Swine, Vascular Grafting
Show Abstract · Added May 14, 2018
Standard harvest and preparation of human saphenous vein (HSV) for autologous coronary and peripheral arterial bypass procedures is associated with injury and increased oxidative stress that negatively affect graft performance. In this study we investigated the global metabolomic profiles of HSV before (unprepared; UP) and after standard vein graft preparation (AP). AP-HSV showed impaired vasomotor function that was associated with increased oxidative stress, phospholipid hydrolysis and energy depletion that are characteristic of mechanical and chemical injury. A porcine model (PSV) was utilized to validate these metabolomic changes in HSV and to determine the efficacy of an improved preparation technique (OP) using pressure-regulated distension, a non-toxic vein marker, and graft storage in buffered PlasmaLyte solution in limiting metabolic decompensation due to graft preparation. Deficits in vasomotor function and metabolic signature observed in AP-PSV could be largely mitigated with the OP procedure. These findings suggest that simple strategies aimed at reducing injury during graft harvest and preparation represents a straightforward and viable strategy to preserve conduit function and possibly improve graft patency.
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14 MeSH Terms
Defective Sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism is a druggable target in Huntington's disease.
Di Pardo A, Amico E, Basit A, Armirotti A, Joshi P, Neely MD, Vuono R, Castaldo S, Digilio AF, Scalabrì F, Pepe G, Elifani F, Madonna M, Jeong SK, Park BM, D'Esposito M, Bowman AB, Barker RA, Maglione V
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 5280
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aldehyde-Lyases, Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme Inhibitors, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Huntington Disease, Lysophospholipids, Male, Mice, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor), Receptors, Lysosphingolipid, Sphingosine
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2018
Huntington's disease is characterized by a complex and heterogeneous pathogenic profile. Studies have shown that disturbance in lipid homeostasis may represent a critical determinant in the progression of several neurodegenerative disorders. The recognition of perturbed lipid metabolism is only recently becoming evident in HD. In order to provide more insight into the nature of such a perturbation and into the effect its modulation may have in HD pathology, we investigated the metabolism of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), one of the most important bioactive lipids, in both animal models and patient samples. Here, we demonstrated that S1P metabolism is significantly disrupted in HD even at early stage of the disease and importantly, we revealed that such a dysfunction represents a common denominator among multiple disease models ranging from cells to humans through mouse models. Interestingly, the in vitro anti-apoptotic and the pro-survival actions seen after modulation of S1P-metabolizing enzymes allows this axis to emerge as a new druggable target and unfolds its promising therapeutic potential for the development of more effective and targeted interventions against this incurable condition.
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15 MeSH Terms
PUFA levels in erythrocyte membrane phospholipids are differentially associated with colorectal adenoma risk.
Rifkin SB, Shrubsole MJ, Cai Q, Smalley WE, Ness RM, Swift LL, Zheng W, Murff HJ
(2017) Br J Nutr 117: 1615-1622
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Arachidonic Acid, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Eicosapentaenoic Acid, Erythrocyte Membrane, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Phospholipids, Risk Factors, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Dietary intake of PUFA has been associated with colorectal neoplasm risk; however, results from observational studies have been inconsistent. Most prior studies have utilised self-reported dietary measures to assess fatty acid exposure which might be more susceptible to measurement error and biases compared with biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether erythrocyte phospholipid membrane PUFA percentages are associated with colorectal adenoma risk. We included data from 904 adenoma cases and 835 polyp-free controls who participated in the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study, a large colonoscopy-based case-control study. Erythrocyte membrane PUFA percentages were measured using GC. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted OR for risk of colorectal adenomas with erythrocyte membrane PUFA. Higher erythrocyte membrane percentages of arachidonic acid was associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas (adjusted OR 1·66; 95 % CI 1·05, 2·62, P trend=0·02) comparing the highest tertile to the lowest tertile. The effect size for arachidonic acid was more pronounced when restricting the analysis to advanced adenomas only. Higher erythrocyte membrane EPA percentages were associated with a trend towards a reduced risk of advanced colorectal adenomas (P trend=0·05). Erythrocyte membrane arachidonic acid percentages are associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas.
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Lipid emulsion enhances cardiac performance after ischemia-reperfusion in isolated hearts from summer-active arctic ground squirrels.
Salzman MM, Cheng Q, Deklotz RJ, Dulai GK, Douglas HF, Dikalova AE, Weihrauch D, Barnes BM, Riess ML
(2017) J Comp Physiol B 187: 715-724
MeSH Terms: Animals, Emulsions, Female, Glucose, Heart, Male, Myocardial Reperfusion Injury, Phospholipids, Rats, Sciuridae, Seasons, Soybean Oil
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2019
Hibernating mammals, like the arctic ground squirrel (AGS), exhibit robust resistance to myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Regulated preference for lipid over glucose to fuel metabolism may play an important role. We tested whether providing lipid in an emulsion protects hearts from summer-active AGS better than hearts from Brown Norway (BN) rats against normothermic IR injury. Langendorff-prepared AGS and BN rat hearts were perfused with Krebs solution containing 7.5 mM glucose with or without 1% Intralipid™. After stabilization and cardioplegia, hearts underwent 45-min global ischemia and 60-min reperfusion. Coronary flow, isovolumetric left ventricular pressure, and mitochondrial redox state were measured continuously; infarct size was measured at the end of the experiment. Glucose-only AGS hearts functioned significantly better on reperfusion than BN rat hearts. Intralipid™ administration resulted in additional functional improvement in AGS compared to glucose-only and BN rat hearts. Infarct size was not different among groups. Even under non-hibernating conditions, AGS hearts performed better after IR than the best-protected rat strain. This, however, appears to strongly depend on metabolic fuel: Intralipid™ led to a significant improvement in return of function in AGS, but not in BN rat hearts, suggesting that year-round endogenous mechanisms are involved in myocardial lipid utilization that contributes to improved cardiac performance, independent of the metabolic rate decrease during hibernation. Comparative lipid analysis revealed four candidates as possible cardioprotective lipid groups. The improved function in Intralipid™-perfused AGS hearts also challenges the current paradigm that increased glucose and decreased lipid metabolism are favorable during myocardial IR.
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Identification of a novel series of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative phospholipid oxidation products containing the cyclopentenone moiety and : Implication in atherosclerosis.
Lu J, Guo S, Xue X, Chen Q, Ge J, Zhuo Y, Zhong H, Chen B, Zhao M, Han W, Suzuki T, Zhu M, Xia L, Schneider C, Blackwell TS, Porter NA, Zheng L, Tsimikas S, Yin H
(2017) J Biol Chem 292: 5378-5391
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Antioxidants, Atherosclerosis, Cyclopentanes, Foam Cells, Humans, Inflammation, Lipoproteins, LDL, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Oxidative Stress, Phospholipids, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 29, 2017
Oxidative stress and inflammation are two major contributing factors to atherosclerosis, a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Oxidation of phospholipids on the surface of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles generated under oxidative stress has been associated with the progression of atherosclerosis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly defined. We identified a novel series of oxidation products containing the cyclopentenone moiety, termed deoxy-A/J-isoprostanes-phosphocholine, from 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl--glycero-3-phosphocholine using mass spectrometry and by comparison to a chemically synthesized standard. Transcriptomic analysis (RNA-seq) demonstrated that these compounds affected >200 genes in bone marrow-derived macrophages, and genes associated with inflammatory and anti-oxidative responses are among the top 5 differentially expressed. To further investigate the biological relevance of these novel oxidized phospholipids in atherosclerosis, we chemically synthesized a representative compound 1-palmitoyl-2-15-deoxy-δ-12,14-prostaglandin J--glycero-3-phosphocholine (15d-PGJ-PC) and found that it induced anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant responses in macrophages through modulation of NF-κB, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), and Nrf2 pathways; this compound also showed potent anti-inflammatory properties in a mice model of LPS-induced systematic inflammatory response syndrome. Additionally, 15d-PGJ-PC inhibited macrophage foam cell formation, suggesting a beneficial role against atherosclerosis. These properties were consistent with decreased levels of these compounds in the plasma of patients with coronary heart disease compared with control subjects. Our findings uncovered a novel molecular mechanism for the negative regulation of inflammation and positive enhancement of anti-oxidative responses in macrophages by these oxidized phospholipids in LDL in the context of atherosclerosis.
© 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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