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Dual excitation wavelength system for combined fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman spectroscopy.
Masson LE, O'Brien CM, Pence IJ, Herington JL, Reese J, van Leeuwen TG, Mahadevan-Jansen A
(2018) Analyst 143: 6049-6060
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cervix Uteri, Collagen, Female, Gelatin, Mice, Phantoms, Imaging, Pregnancy, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, Water
Show Abstract · Added November 26, 2018
A fiber optic probe-based Raman spectroscopy system using a single laser module with two excitation wavelengths, at 680 and 785 nm, has been developed for measuring the fingerprint and high wavenumber regions using a single detector. This system is simpler and less expensive than previously reported configurations of combined fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman systems, and its probe-based implementation facilitates numerous in vivo applications. The high wavenumber region of the Raman spectrum ranges from 2800-3800 cm-1 and contains valuable information corresponding to the molecular vibrations of proteins, lipids, and water, which is complimentary to the biochemical signatures found in the fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1), which probes DNA, lipids, and proteins. The efficacy of the system is demonstrated by tracking changes in water content in tissue-mimicking phantoms, where Voigtian decomposition of the high wavenumber water peak revealed a correlation between the water content and type of water-tissue interactions in the samples. This dual wavelength system was then used for in vivo assessment of cervical remodeling during mouse pregnancy, a physiologic process with known changes in tissue hydration. The system shows that Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to changes in collagen content in the fingerprint region and hydration state in the high wavenumber region, which was verified using an ex vivo comparison of wet and dry weight. Simultaneous fingerprint and high wavenumber Raman spectroscopy will allow precise in vivo quantification of tissue water content in the high wavenumber region, paired with the high biochemical specificity of the fingerprint region.
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10 MeSH Terms
Optimization of selective inversion recovery magnetization transfer imaging for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain.
Dortch RD, Bagnato F, Gochberg DF, Gore JC, Smith SA
(2018) Magn Reson Med 80: 1824-1835
MeSH Terms: Adult, Algorithms, Brain, Brain Chemistry, Brain Mapping, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Myelin Sheath, Phantoms, Imaging
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2018
PURPOSE - To optimize a selective inversion recovery (SIR) sequence for macromolecular content mapping in the human brain at 3.0T.
THEORY AND METHODS - SIR is a quantitative method for measuring magnetization transfer (qMT) that uses a low-power, on-resonance inversion pulse. This results in a biexponential recovery of free water signal that can be sampled at various inversion/predelay times (t t ) to estimate a subset of qMT parameters, including the macromolecular-to-free pool-size-ratio (PSR), the R of free water (R ), and the rate of MT exchange (k ). The adoption of SIR has been limited by long acquisition times (≈4 min/slice). Here, we use Cramér-Rao lower bound theory and data reduction strategies to select optimal t /t combinations to reduce imaging times. The schemes were experimentally validated in phantoms, and tested in healthy volunteers (N = 4) and a multiple sclerosis patient.
RESULTS - Two optimal sampling schemes were determined: (i) a 5-point scheme (k estimated) and (ii) a 4-point scheme (k assumed). In phantoms, the 5/4-point schemes yielded parameter estimates with similar SNRs as our previous 16-point scheme, but with 4.1/6.1-fold shorter scan times. Pair-wise comparisons between schemes did not detect significant differences for any scheme/parameter. In humans, parameter values were consistent with published values, and similar levels of precision were obtained from all schemes. Furthermore, fixing k reduced the sensitivity of PSR to partial-volume averaging, yielding more consistent estimates throughout the brain.
CONCLUSIONS - qMT parameters can be robustly estimated in ≤1 min/slice (without independent measures of ΔB , B1+, and T ) when optimized t -t combinations are selected.
© 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
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12 MeSH Terms
The Impact of Model-Based Clutter Suppression on Cluttered, Aberrated Wavefronts.
Dei K, Byram B
(2017) IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control 64: 1450-1464
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Computer Simulation, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Phantoms, Imaging, Ultrasonography
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Recent studies reveal that both phase aberration and reverberation play a major role in degrading ultrasound image quality. We previously developed an algorithm for suppressing clutter, but we have not yet tested it in the context of aberrated wavefronts. In this paper, we evaluate our previously reported algorithm, called aperture domain model image reconstruction (ADMIRE), in the presence of phase aberration and in the presence of multipath scattering and phase aberration. We use simulations to investigate phase aberration corruption and correction in the presence of reverberation. As part of this paper, we observed that ADMIRE leads to suppressed levels of aberration. In order to accurately characterize aberrated signals of interest, we introduced an adaptive component to ADMIRE to account for aberration, referred to as adaptive ADMIRE. We then use ADMIRE, adaptive ADMIRE, and conventional filtering methods to characterize aberration profiles on in vivo liver data. These in vivo results suggest that adaptive ADMIRE could be used to better characterize a wider range of aberrated wavefronts. The aberration profiles' full-width at half-maximum of ADMIRE, adaptive ADMIRE, and postfiltered data with 0.4- mm spatial cutoff frequency are 4.0 ± 0.28 mm, 2.8 ± 1.3 mm, and 2.8 ± 0.57 mm, respectively, while the average root-mean square values in the same order are 16 ± 5.4 ns, 20 ± 6.3 ns, and 19 ± 3.9 ns, respectively. Finally, because ADMIRE suppresses aberration, we perform a limited evaluation of image quality using simulations and in vivo data to determine how ADMIRE and adaptive ADMIRE perform with and without aberration correction.
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5 MeSH Terms
Adaptive Clutter Demodulation for Non-Contrast Ultrasound Perfusion Imaging.
Tierney J, Coolbaugh C, Towse T, Byram B
(2017) IEEE Trans Med Imaging 36: 1979-1991
MeSH Terms: Blood Flow Velocity, Humans, Motion, Perfusion Imaging, Phantoms, Imaging, Ultrasonography
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Conventional Doppler ultrasound is useful for visualizing fast blood flow in large resolvable vessels. However, frame rate and tissue clutter caused by movement of the patient or sonographer make visualizing slow flow with ultrasound difficult. Patient and sonographer motion causes spectral broadening of the clutter signal, which limits ultrasound's sensitivity to velocities greater than 5-10 mm/s for typical clinical imaging frequencies. To address this, we propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.52 mm/s. The proposed technique uses plane wave imaging and an adaptive frequency and amplitude demodulation scheme to decrease the bandwidth of tissue clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at suppressing tissue clutter bandwidths due to sonographer hand motion alone, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a stationary phantom. Additionally, to test in vivo feasibility, arterial occlusion and muscle contraction studies were performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2 mm/s or greater at a 7.8 MHz center frequency. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 175 Hz (8.60mm/s), which were decreased to 10.5 Hz (0.52 mm/s) at -60 dB using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler studies resulted in 4.73 dB and 4.80 dB dynamic ranges of the blood flow with the proposed filter and 0.15 dB and 0.16 dB dynamic ranges of the blood flow with a conventional 50 Hz high-pass filter for the occlusion and contraction studies, respectively.
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MeSH Terms
Measurement of APT using a combined CERT-AREX approach with varying duty cycles.
Zu Z, Li H, Xu J, Zhang XY, Zaiss M, Li K, Does MD, Gore JC, Gochberg DF
(2017) Magn Reson Imaging 42: 22-31
MeSH Terms: Amides, Animals, Brain, Brain Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Glioblastoma, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Phantoms, Imaging, Protons, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The goal is to develop an imaging method where contrast reflects amide-water magnetization exchange, with minimal signal contributions from other sources. Conventional chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging of amides (often called amide proton transfer, or APT, and quantified by the metric MTR) is confounded by several factors unrelated to amides, such as aliphatic protons, water relaxation, and macromolecular magnetization transfer. In this work, we examined the effects of combining our previous chemical exchange rotation (CERT) approach with the non-linear AREX method while using different duty cycles (DC) for the label and reference scans. The dependencies of this approach, named AREX, on tissue parameters, including T, T, semi-solid component concentration (f), relayed nuclear Overhauser enhancement (rNOE), and nearby amines, were studied through numerical simulations and control sample experiments at 9.4T and 1μT irradiation. Simulations and experiments show that AREX is sensitive to amide-water exchange effects, but is relatively insensitive to T, T, f, nearby amine, and distant aliphatic protons, while the conventional metric MTR as well as several other APT imaging methods, are significantly affected by at least some of these confounding factors.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Spin-lock imaging of exogenous exchange-based contrast agents to assess tissue pH.
Zu Z, Li H, Jiang X, Gore JC
(2018) Magn Reson Med 79: 298-305
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Brain Neoplasms, Contrast Media, Glioblastoma, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Iohexol, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Mannitol, Models, Theoretical, Phantoms, Imaging, Rats
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
PURPOSE - Some X-ray contrast agents contain exchangeable protons that give rise to exchange-based effects on MRI, including chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). However, CEST has poor specificity to explicit exchange parameters. Spin-lock sequences at high field are also sensitive to chemical exchange. Here, we evaluate whether spin-locking techniques can detect the contrast agent iohexol in vivo after intravenous administration, and their potential for measuring changes in tissue pH.
METHODS - Two metrics of contrast based on R , the spin lattice relaxation rate in the rotating frame, were derived from the behavior of R at different locking fields. Solutions containing iohexol at different concentrations and pH were used to evaluate the ability of the two metrics to quantify exchange effects. Images were also acquired from rat brains bearing tumors before and after intravenous injections of iohexol to evaluate the potential of spin-lock techniques for detecting the agent and pH variations.
RESULTS - The two metrics were found to depend separately on either agent concentration or pH. Spin-lock imaging may therefore provide specific quantification of iohexol concentration and the iohexol-water exchange rate, which reports on pH.
CONCLUSIONS - Spin-lock techniques may be used to assess the dynamics of intravenous contrast agents and detect extracellular acidification. Magn Reson Med 79:298-305, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
© 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
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1 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
New resonator geometries for ICE decoupling of loop arrays.
Yan X, Gore JC, Grissom WA
(2017) J Magn Reson 277: 59-67
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Computer Simulation, Electromagnetic Fields, Image Enhancement, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Phantoms, Imaging
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
RF arrays with a large number of independent coil elements are advantageous for parallel transmission (pTx) and reception at high fields. One of the main challenges in designing RF arrays is to minimize the electromagnetic (EM) coupling between the coil elements. The induced current elimination (ICE) method, which uses additional resonator elements to cancel coils' mutual EM coupling, has proven to be a simple and efficient solution for decoupling microstrip, L/C loop, monopole and dipole arrays. However, in previous embodiments of conventional ICE decoupling, the decoupling elements acted as "magnetic-walls" with low transmit fields and consequently low MR signal near them. To solve this problem, new resonator geometries including overlapped and perpendicular decoupling loops are proposed. The new geometries were analyzed theoretically and validated in EM simulations, bench tests and MR experiments. The isolation between two closely-placed loops could be improved from about -5dB to <-45dB by using the new geometries.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Improving Registration Robustness for Image-Guided Liver Surgery in a Novel Human-to-Phantom Data Framework.
Collins JA, Weis JA, Heiselman JS, Clements LW, Simpson AL, Jarnagin WR, Miga MI
(2017) IEEE Trans Med Imaging 36: 1502-1510
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Hepatectomy, Humans, Liver, Phantoms, Imaging, Surgery, Computer-Assisted
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2018
In open image-guided liver surgery (IGLS), a sparse representation of the intraoperative organ surface can be acquired to drive image-to-physical registration. We hypothesize that uncharacterized error induced by variation in the collection patterns of organ surface data limits the accuracy and robustness of an IGLS registration. Clinical validation of such registration methods is challenged due to the difficulty in obtaining data representative of the true state of organ deformation. We propose a novel human-to-phantom validation framework that transforms surface collection patterns from in vivo IGLS procedures (n = 13) onto a well-characterized hepatic deformation phantom for the purpose of validating surface-driven, volumetric nonrigid registration methods. An important feature of the approach is that it centers on combining workflow-realistic data acquisition and surgical deformations that are appropriate in behavior and magnitude. Using the approach, we investigate volumetric target registration error (TRE) with both current rigid IGLS and our improved nonrigid registration methods. Additionally, we introduce a spatial data resampling approach to mitigate the workflow-sensitive sampling problem. Using our human-to-phantom approach, TRE after routine rigid registration was 10.9 ± 0.6 mm with a signed closest point distance associated with residual surface fit in the range of ±10 mm, highly representative of open liver resections. After applying our novel resampling strategy and improved deformation correction method, TRE was reduced by 51%, i.e., a TRE of 5.3 ± 0.5 mm. This paper reported herein realizes a novel tractable approach for the validation of image-to-physical registration methods and demonstrates promising results for our correction method.
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MeSH Terms
Improved traveling-wave efficiency in 7T human MRI using passive local loop and dipole arrays.
Yan X, Zhang X, Gore JC, Grissom WA
(2017) Magn Reson Imaging 39: 103-109
MeSH Terms: Brain, Computer Simulation, Electromagnetic Radiation, Equipment Design, Head, Humans, Knee Joint, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Phantoms, Imaging, Radio Waves, Reproducibility of Results
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Traveling-wave MRI, which uses relatively small and simple RF antennae, has robust matching performance and capability for large field-of-view (FOV) imaging. However, the power efficiency of traveling-wave MRI is much lower than conventional methods, which limits its application. One simple approach to improve the power efficiency is to place passive resonators around the subject being imaged. The feasibility of this approach has been demonstrated in previous works using a single small resonant loop. In this work, we aim to explore how much the improvements can be maintained in human imaging using an array design, and whether electric dipoles can be used as local elements. First, a series of electromagnetic (EM) simulations were performed on a human model. Then RF coils were constructed and the simulation results using the best setup for head imaging were validated in MR experiments. By using the passive local loop and transverse dipole arrays, respectively, the transmit efficiency (B) of traveling-wave MRI can be improved by 3-fold in the brain and 2-fold in the knee. The types of passive elements (loops or dipoles) should be carefully chosen for brain or knee imaging to maximize the improvement, and the enhancement depends on the local body configuration.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Contrast mechanisms associated with neuromelanin-MRI.
Trujillo P, Summers PE, Ferrari E, Zucca FA, Sturini M, Mainardi LT, Cerutti S, Smith AK, Smith SA, Zecca L, Costa A
(2017) Magn Reson Med 78: 1790-1800
MeSH Terms: Humans, Iron, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Melanins, Models, Biological, Phantoms, Imaging, Substantia Nigra
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
PURPOSE - To investigate the physical mechanisms associated with the contrast observed in neuromelanin MRI.
METHODS - Phantoms having different concentrations of synthetic melanins with different degrees of iron loading were examined on a 3 Tesla scanner using relaxometry and quantitative magnetization transfer (MT).
RESULTS - Concentration-dependent T and T shortening was most pronounced for the melanin pigment when combined with iron. Metal-free melanin had a negligible effect on the magnetization transfer spectra. On the contrary, the presence of iron-laden melanins resulted in a decreased magnetization transfer ratio. The presence of melanin or iron (or both) did not have a significant effect on the macromolecular content, represented by the pool size ratio.
CONCLUSION - The primary mechanism underlying contrast in neuromelanin-MRI appears to be the T reduction associated with melanin-iron complexes. The macromolecular content is not significantly influenced by the presence of melanin with or without iron, and thus the MT is not directly affected. However, as T plays a role in determining the MT-weighted signal, the magnetization transfer ratio is reduced in the presence of melanin-iron complexes. Magn Reson Med 78:1790-1800, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
© 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.
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7 MeSH Terms