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Building collagen IV smart scaffolds on the outside of cells.
Brown KL, Cummings CF, Vanacore RM, Hudson BG
(2017) Protein Sci 26: 2151-2161
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Motifs, Amino Acid Oxidoreductases, Animals, Antigens, Neoplasm, Basement Membrane, Collagen Type IV, Eukaryotic Cells, Extracellular Matrix, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Peroxidases, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Subunits, Receptors, Interleukin-1
Show Abstract · Added November 2, 2017
Collagen IV scaffolds assemble through an intricate pathway that begins intracellularly and is completed extracellularly. Multiple intracellular enzymes act in concert to assemble collagen IV protomers, the building blocks of collagen IV scaffolds. After being secreted from cells, protomers are activated to initiate oligomerization, forming insoluble networks that are structurally reinforced with covalent crosslinks. Within these networks, embedded binding sites along the length of the protomer lead to the "decoration" of collagen IV triple helix with numerous functional molecules. We refer to these networks as "smart" scaffolds, which as a component of the basement membrane enable the development and function of multicellular tissues in all animal phyla. In this review, we present key molecular mechanisms that drive the assembly of collagen IV smart scaffolds.
© 2017 The Protein Society.
1 Communities
1 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
The sulfilimine cross-link of collagen IV contributes to kidney tubular basement membrane stiffness.
Bhave G, Colon S, Ferrell N
(2017) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 313: F596-F602
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basement Membrane, Biomechanical Phenomena, Collagen Type IV, Cross-Linking Reagents, Elastic Modulus, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Genotype, Imines, Kidney, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Peroxidase, Phenotype, Protein Conformation, Tensile Strength
Show Abstract · Added December 7, 2017
Basement membranes (BMs), a specialized form of extracellular matrix, underlie nearly all cell layers and provide structural support for tissues and interact with cell surface receptors to determine cell behavior. Both macromolecular composition and stiffness of the BM influence cell-BM interactions. Collagen IV is a major constituent of the BM that forms an extensively cross-linked oligomeric network. Its deficiency leads to BM mechanical instability, as observed with glomerular BM in Alport syndrome. These findings have led to the hypothesis that collagen IV and its cross-links determine BM stiffness. A sulfilimine bond (S = N) between a methionine sulfur and a lysine nitrogen cross-links collagen IV and is formed by the matrix enzyme peroxidasin. In peroxidasin knockout mice with reduced collagen IV sulfilimine cross-links, we find a reduction in renal tubular BM stiffness. Thus this work provides the first direct experimental evidence that collagen IV sulfilimine cross-links contribute to BM mechanical properties and provides a foundation for future work on the relationship of BM mechanics to cell function in renal disease.
Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.
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16 MeSH Terms
Trapping redox partnerships in oxidant-sensitive proteins with a small, thiol-reactive cross-linker.
Allan KM, Loberg MA, Chepngeno J, Hurtig JE, Tripathi S, Kang MG, Allotey JK, Widdershins AH, Pilat JM, Sizek HJ, Murphy WJ, Naticchia MR, David JB, Morano KA, West JD
(2016) Free Radic Biol Med 101: 356-366
MeSH Terms: Cross-Linking Reagents, Disulfides, Glutathione Peroxidase, Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases, Oxidants, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Oxidoreductases Acting on Sulfur Group Donors, Peroxiredoxins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins, Sulfhydryl Compounds, Sulfones, Thioredoxins, tert-Butylhydroperoxide
Show Abstract · Added April 24, 2017
A broad range of redox-regulated proteins undergo reversible disulfide bond formation on oxidation-prone cysteine residues. Heightened reactivity of the thiol groups in these cysteines also increases susceptibility to modification by organic electrophiles, a property that can be exploited in the study of redox networks. Here, we explored whether divinyl sulfone (DVSF), a thiol-reactive bifunctional electrophile, cross-links oxidant-sensitive proteins to their putative redox partners in cells. To test this idea, previously identified oxidant targets involved in oxidant defense (namely, peroxiredoxins, methionine sulfoxide reductases, sulfiredoxin, and glutathione peroxidases), metabolism, and proteostasis were monitored for cross-link formation following treatment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with DVSF. Several proteins screened, including multiple oxidant defense proteins, underwent intermolecular and/or intramolecular cross-linking in response to DVSF. Specific redox-active cysteines within a subset of DVSF targets were found to influence cross-linking; in addition, DVSF-mediated cross-linking of its targets was impaired in cells first exposed to oxidants. Since cross-linking appeared to involve redox-active cysteines in these proteins, we examined whether potential redox partners became cross-linked to them upon DVSF treatment. Specifically, we found that several substrates of thioredoxins were cross-linked to the cytosolic thioredoxin Trx2 in cells treated with DVSF. However, other DVSF targets, like the peroxiredoxin Ahp1, principally formed intra-protein cross-links upon DVSF treatment. Moreover, additional protein targets, including several known to undergo S-glutathionylation, were conjugated via DVSF to glutathione. Our results indicate that DVSF is of potential use as a chemical tool for irreversibly trapping and discovering thiol-based redox partnerships within cells.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Embryo implantation triggers dynamic spatiotemporal expression of the basement membrane toolkit during uterine reprogramming.
Jones-Paris CR, Paria S, Berg T, Saus J, Bhave G, Paria BC, Hudson BG
(2017) Matrix Biol 57-58: 347-365
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basement Membrane, Collagen Type IV, Embryo Implantation, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Female, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Gene Expression Regulation, Injections, Laminin, Mice, Peptide Fragments, Peroxidase, Pregnancy, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, RNA, Messenger, Sesame Oil, Uterus
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2016
Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized extracellular scaffolds that influence behaviors of cells in epithelial, endothelial, muscle, nervous, and fat tissues. Throughout development and in response to injury or disease, BMs are fine-tuned with specific protein compositions, ultrastructure, and localization. These features are modulated through implements of the BM toolkit that is comprised of collagen IV, laminin, perlecan, and nidogen. Two additional proteins, peroxidasin and Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), have recently emerged as potential members of the toolkit. In the present study, we sought to determine whether peroxidasin and GPBP undergo dynamic regulation in the assembly of uterine tissue BMs in early pregnancy as a tractable model for dynamic adult BMs. We explored these proteins in the context of collagen IV and laminin that are known to extensively change for decidualization. Electron microscopic analyses revealed: 1) a smooth continuous layer of BM in between the epithelial and stromal layers of the preimplantation endometrium; and 2) interrupted, uneven, and progressively thickened BM within the pericellular space of the postimplantation decidua. Quantification of mRNA levels by qPCR showed changes in expression levels that were complemented by immunofluorescence localization of peroxidasin, GPBP, collagen IV, and laminin. Novel BM-associated and subcellular spatiotemporal localization patterns of the four components suggest both collective pericellular functions and distinct functions in the uterus during reprogramming for embryo implantation.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
3 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Sex- and structure-specific differences in antioxidant responses to methylmercury during early development.
Ruszkiewicz JA, Bowman AB, Farina M, Rocha JBT, Aschner M
(2016) Neurotoxicology 56: 118-126
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Antioxidants, Brain, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Glutathione, Glutathione Peroxidase, Male, Methylmercury Compounds, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, RNA, Messenger, Sex Characteristics, Thioredoxin-Disulfide Reductase, Thioredoxins
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant and neurotoxin, particularly hazardous to developing and young individuals. MeHg neurotoxicity during early development has been shown to be sex-dependent via disturbances in redox homeostasis, a key event mediating MeHg neurotoxicity. Therefore, we investigated if MeHg-induced changes in key systems of antioxidant defense are sex-dependent. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to MeHg during the gestational and lactational periods, modeling human prenatal and neonatal exposure routes. Dams were exposed to 5ppm MeHg via drinking water from early gestational period until postnatal day 21 (PND21). On PND21 a pair of siblings (a female and a male) from multiple (5-6) litters were euthanized and tissue samples were taken for analysis. Cytoplasmic and nuclear extracts were isolated from fresh cerebrum and cerebellum and used to determine thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) levels, as well as thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. The remaining tissue was used for mRNA analysis. MeHg-induced antioxidant response was not uniform for all the analyzed antioxidant molecules, and sexual dimorphism in response to MeHg treatment was evident for TrxR, Trx and GPx. The pattern of response, namely a decrease in males and an increase in females, may impart differential and sex-specific susceptibility to MeHg. GSH levels were unchanged in MeHg treated animals and irrespective of sex. Trx was reduced only in nuclear extracts from male cerebella, exemplifying a structure-specific response. Results from the gene expression analysis suggest posttranscriptional mechanism of sex-specific regulation of the antioxidant response upon MeHg treatment. The study demonstrates for the first time sex-and structure-specific changes in the response of the thioredoxin system to MeHg neurotoxicity and suggests that these differences in antioxidant responses might impart differential susceptibility to developmental MeHg exposure.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
The Ancient Immunoglobulin Domains of Peroxidasin Are Required to Form Sulfilimine Cross-links in Collagen IV.
Ero-Tolliver IA, Hudson BG, Bhave G
(2015) J Biol Chem 290: 21741-8
MeSH Terms: Collagen Type IV, Cross-Linking Reagents, Evolution, Molecular, Extracellular Matrix, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, HEK293 Cells, Heme, Humans, Imines, Immunoglobulins, Models, Biological, Peroxidase, Peroxidases, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2015
The collagen IV sulfilimine cross-link and its catalyzing enzyme, peroxidasin, represent a dyad critical for tissue development, which is conserved throughout the animal kingdom. Peroxidasin forms novel sulfilimine bonds between opposing methionine and hydroxylysine residues to structurally reinforce the collagen IV scaffold, a function critical for basement membrane and tissue integrity. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cross-link formation remains unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that the catalytic domain of peroxidasin and its immunoglobulin (Ig) domains are required for efficient sulfilimine bond formation. Thus, these molecular features underlie the evolutionarily conserved function of peroxidasin in tissue development and integrity and distinguish peroxidasin from other peroxidases, such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO).
© 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
1 Communities
2 Members
1 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
5'-O-Alkylpyridoxamines: Lipophilic Analogues of Pyridoxamine Are Potent Scavengers of 1,2-Dicarbonyls.
Amarnath V, Amarnath K, Avance J, Stec DF, Voziyan P
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 1469-75
MeSH Terms: Biocatalysis, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Free Radical Scavengers, Free Radicals, Glucose, Horseradish Peroxidase, Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions, Membrane Proteins, Molecular Conformation, Muramidase, Pyridoxamine, Pyruvaldehyde, Spectrophotometry, Ultraviolet, Superoxide Dismutase
Show Abstract · Added June 9, 2017
Pyridoxamine (PM) is a prospective drug for the treatment of diabetic complications. In order to make zwitterionic PM more lipophilic and improve its tissue distribution, PM derivatives containing medium length alkyl groups on the hydroxymethyl side chain were prepared. The synthesis of these alkylpyridoxamines (alkyl-PMs) starting from pyridoxine offers high yields and is amenable to bulk preparations. Interestingly, alkyl-PMs were found to react with methylglyoxal (MGO), a major toxic product of glucose metabolism and autoxidation, several orders of magnitude faster than PM. This suggests the formation of nonionic pyrido-1,3-oxazine as the key step in the reaction of PM with MGO. Since the primary target of MGO in proteins is the guanidine side chain of arginine, alkyl-PMs were shown to be more effective than PM in reducing the modification of N-α-benzoylarginine by MGO. Alkyl-PMs in the presence of MGO also protected the enzymatic activity of lysozyme that contains several arginine residues next to its active site. Alkyl-PMs can be expected to trap MGO and other toxic 1,2-carbonyl compounds more effectively than PM, especially in lipophilic tissue environments, thus protecting macromolecules from functional damage. This suggests potential therapeutic uses for alkyl-PMs in diabetes and other diseases characterized by the elevated levels of toxic dicarbonyl compounds.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Selenoprotein P is the major selenium transport protein in mouse milk.
Hill KE, Motley AK, Winfrey VP, Burk RF
(2014) PLoS One 9: e103486
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Biological Transport, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Female, Glutathione Peroxidase, In Situ Hybridization, Male, Mammary Glands, Animal, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Milk, Selenium, Selenoprotein P, Weaning, Weight Gain
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Selenium is transferred from the mouse dam to its neonate via milk. Milk contains selenium in selenoprotein form as selenoprotein P (Sepp1) and glutathione peroxidase-3 (Gpx3) as well as in non-specific protein form as selenomethionine. Selenium is also present in milk in uncharacterized small-molecule form. We eliminated selenomethionine from the mice in these experiments by feeding a diet that contained sodium selenite as the source of selenium. Selenium-replete dams with deletion of Sepp1 or Gpx3 were studied to assess the effects of these genes on selenium transfer to the neonate. Sepp1 knockout caused a drop in milk selenium to 27% of the value in wild-type milk and a drop in selenium acquisition by the neonates to 35%. In addition to decreasing milk selenium by eliminating Sepp1, deletion of Sepp1 causes a decline in whole-body selenium, which likely also contributes to the decreased transfer of selenium to the neonate. Deletion of Gpx3 did not decrease milk selenium content or neonate selenium acquisition by measurable amounts. Thus, when the dam is fed selenium-adequate diet (0.25 mg selenium/kg diet), milk Sepp1 transfers a large amount of selenium to neonates but the transfer of selenium by Gpx3 is below detection by our methods.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture.
McCall AS, Cummings CF, Bhave G, Vanacore R, Page-McCaw A, Hudson BG
(2014) Cell 157: 1380-92
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basement Membrane, Bromine, Cell Line, Collagen, Drosophila, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Humans, Imines, Larva, Mice, Peroxidase, Trace Elements
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2014
Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br(-)) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br(-) is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a posttranslational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine formation. Dietary Br deficiency is lethal in Drosophila, whereas Br replenishment restores viability, demonstrating its physiologic requirement. Importantly, Br-deficient flies phenocopy the developmental and BM defects observed in peroxidasin mutants and indicate a functional connection between Br(-), collagen IV, and peroxidasin. We establish that Br(-) is required for sulfilimine formation within collagen IV, an event critical for BM assembly and tissue development. Thus, bromine is an essential trace element for all animals, and its deficiency may be relevant to BM alterations observed in nutritional and smoking-related disease. PAPERFLICK:
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
4 Members
1 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Promoter hypermethylation and suppression of glutathione peroxidase 3 are associated with inflammatory breast carcinogenesis.
Mohamed MM, Sabet S, Peng DF, Nouh MA, El-Shinawi M, El-Rifai W
(2014) Oxid Med Cell Longev 2014: 787195
MeSH Terms: Breast, Breast Neoplasms, DNA Methylation, Down-Regulation, Female, Glutathione Peroxidase, Humans, Middle Aged, Promoter Regions, Genetic, RNA, Messenger
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2014
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in breast cancer initiation, promotion, and progression. Inhibition of antioxidant enzymes that remove ROS was found to accelerate cancer growth. Studies showed that inhibition of glutathione peroxidase-3 (GPX3) was associated with cancer progression. Although the role of GPX3 has been studied in different cancer types, its role in breast cancer and its epigenetic regulation have not yet been investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate GPX3 expression and epigenetic regulation in carcinoma tissues of breast cancer patients' in comparison to normal breast tissues. Furthermore, we compared GPX3 level of expression and methylation status in aggressive phenotype inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) versus non-IBC invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). We found that GPX3 mRNA and protein expression levels were downregulated in the carcinoma tissues of IBC compared to non-IBC. However, we did not detect significant correlation between GPX3 and patients' clinical-pathological prosperities. Promoter hypermethylation of GPX3 gene was detected in carcinoma tissues not normal breast tissues. In addition, IBC carcinoma tissues showed a significant increase in the promoter hypermethylation of GPX3 gene compared to non-IBC. Our results propose that downregulation of GPX3 in IBC may play a role in the disease progression.
0 Communities
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10 MeSH Terms