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KCC3 loss-of-function contributes to Andermann syndrome by inducing activity-dependent neuromuscular junction defects.
Bowerman M, Salsac C, Bernard V, Soulard C, Dionne A, Coque E, Benlefki S, Hince P, Dion PA, Butler-Browne G, Camu W, Bouchard JP, Delpire E, Rouleau GA, Raoul C, Scamps F
(2017) Neurobiol Dis 106: 35-48
MeSH Terms: Agenesis of Corpus Callosum, Animals, Carbamazepine, Cells, Cultured, Chlorides, Disease Models, Animal, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Motor Neurons, Neuromuscular Junction, Neurotransmitter Agents, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Presynaptic Terminals, Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase, Spinal Cord, Symporters, Synaptic Transmission
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Loss-of-function mutations in the potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC3 lead to Andermann syndrome, a severe sensorimotor neuropathy characterized by areflexia, amyotrophy and locomotor abnormalities. The molecular events responsible for axonal loss remain poorly understood. Here, we establish that global or neuron-specific KCC3 loss-of-function in mice leads to early neuromuscular junction (NMJ) abnormalities and muscular atrophy that are consistent with the pre-synaptic neurotransmission defects observed in patients. KCC3 depletion does not modify chloride handling, but promotes an abnormal electrical activity among primary motoneurons and mislocalization of Na/K-ATPase α1 in spinal cord motoneurons. Moreover, the activity-targeting drug carbamazepine restores Na/K-ATPase α1 localization and reduces NMJ denervation in Slc12a6 mice. We here propose that abnormal motoneuron electrical activity contributes to the peripheral neuropathy observed in Andermann syndrome.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Clinical and Genome-Wide Analysis of Cisplatin-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy in Survivors of Adult-Onset Cancer.
Dolan ME, El Charif O, Wheeler HE, Gamazon ER, Ardeshir-Rouhani-Fard S, Monahan P, Feldman DR, Hamilton RJ, Vaughn DJ, Beard CJ, Fung C, Kim J, Fossa SD, Hertz DL, Mushiroda T, Kubo M, Einhorn LH, Cox NJ, Travis LB, Platinum Study Group
(2017) Clin Cancer Res 23: 5757-5768
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Age of Onset, Aged, Cancer Survivors, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cisplatin, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Proteins, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors, Testicular Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added October 27, 2017
Our purpose was to characterize the clinical influences, genetic risk factors, and gene mechanisms contributing to persistent cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (CisIPN) in testicular cancer survivors (TCSs). TCS given cisplatin-based therapy completed the validated EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 questionnaire. An ordinal CisIPN phenotype was derived, and associations with age, smoking, excess drinking, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, cumulative cisplatin dose, and self-reported health were examined for 680 TCS. Genotyping was performed on the Illumina HumanOmniExpressExome chip. Following quality control and imputation, 5.1 million SNPs in 680 genetically European TCS formed the input set. GWAS and PrediXcan were used to identify genetic variation and genetically determined gene expression traits, respectively, contributing to CisIPN. We evaluated two independent datasets for replication: Vanderbilt's electronic health database (BioVU) and the CALGB 90401 trial. Eight sensory items formed a subscale with good internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.88). Variables significantly associated with CisIPN included age at diagnosis (OR per year, 1.06; = 2 × 10), smoking (OR, 1.54; = 0.004), excess drinking (OR, 1.83; = 0.007), and hypertension (OR, 1.61; = 0.03). CisIPN was correlated with lower self-reported health (OR, 0.56; = 2.6 × 10) and weight gain adjusted for years since treatment (OR per Δkg/m, 1.05; = 0.004). PrediXcan identified lower expressions of and and higher expression as associated with CisIPN ( value for each < 5 × 10) with replication of meeting significance criteria (Fisher combined = 0.0089). CisIPN is associated with age, modifiable risk factors, and genetically determined expression level of Further study of implicated genes could elucidate the pathophysiologic underpinnings of CisIPN. .
©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.
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20 MeSH Terms
The KCC3 cotransporter as a therapeutic target for peripheral neuropathy.
Delpire E, Kahle KT
(2017) Expert Opin Ther Targets 21: 113-116
MeSH Terms: Animals, Humans, Mice, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Symporters
Added May 3, 2017
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1 Members
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5 MeSH Terms
KCC3 deficiency-induced disruption of paranodal loops and impairment of axonal excitability in the peripheral nervous system.
Sun YT, Tzeng SF, Lin TS, Hsu KS, Delpire E, Shen MR
(2016) Neuroscience 335: 91-102
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Axons, Genotype, Mice, Knockout, Peripheral Nervous System, Symporters
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2017
The autosomal recessive Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum (HMSN/ACC) is associated with the dysfunction of the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter type 3 (KCC3), which is an electroneutral cotransporter. We previously found that the inhibition of KCC3 cotransporter activity reduces the propagation of action potentials in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). However, the pathogenesis by which KCC3 deficiency impairs peripheral nerve function remains to be examined. Thus, we conducted imaging and electrophysiological studies in the peripheral nerves of KCC3(-/-) mice at various ages. Analysis using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed an age-dependent progressive swelling of microvilli and disorganization of paranodal loops in KCC3(-/-) nerves. Yet, no mislocated voltage-dependent channels were observed between the nodes and juxtaparanodes of KCC3(-/-) nerves. However, electrophysiological studies using the threshold tracking technique indicated a reduced stimulus-response curve slope with an elevated rheobase, a decreased strength-duration time constant, diminished persistent Na(+) currents, and an outward deviation of threshold electrotonus in KCC3(-/-) nerves compared to wild-type nerves. These functional changes indicate an overall reduction in axonal excitability and suggest an increase in paranodal conductance, which was relevant to the pathology at the paranode. Altogether, our findings highlight the importance of KCC3 in maintaining paranodal integrity and in optimizing the propagation of action potentials along peripheral nerves.
Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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7 MeSH Terms
Peripheral motor neuropathy is associated with defective kinase regulation of the KCC3 cotransporter.
Kahle KT, Flores B, Bharucha-Goebel D, Zhang J, Donkervoort S, Hegde M, Hussain G, Duran D, Liang B, Sun D, Bönnemann CG, Delpire E
(2016) Sci Signal 9: ra77
MeSH Terms: Animals, Female, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Mutant Strains, Motor Neurons, Mutation, Missense, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Phosphorylation, Symporters, WNK Lysine-Deficient Protein Kinase 1
Show Abstract · Added August 22, 2016
Using exome sequencing, we identified a de novo mutation (c.2971A>G; T991A) in SLC12A6, the gene encoding the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter KCC3, in a patient with an early-onset, progressive, and severe peripheral neuropathy primarily affecting motor neurons. Normally, the WNK kinase-dependent phosphorylation of T(991) tonically inhibits KCC3; however, cell swelling triggers Thr(991) dephosphorylation to activate the transporter and restore cell volume. KCC3 T991A mutation in patient cells abolished Thr(991) phosphorylation, resulted in constitutive KCC3 activity, and compromised cell volume homeostasis. KCC3(T991A/T991A) mutant mice exhibited constitutive KCC3 activity and recapitulated aspects of the clinical, electrophysiological, and histopathological findings of the patient. These results suggest that the function of the peripheral nervous system depends on finely tuned, kinase-regulated KCC3 activity and implicate abnormal cell volume homeostasis as a previously unreported mechanism of axonal degeneration.
Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.
1 Communities
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13 MeSH Terms
Conformational Stability and Pathogenic Misfolding of the Integral Membrane Protein PMP22.
Schlebach JP, Narayan M, Alford C, Mittendorf KF, Carter BD, Li J, Sanders CR
(2015) J Am Chem Soc 137: 8758-68
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease, Dogs, Humans, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Metals, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Missense, Myelin Proteins, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Protein Conformation, Protein Folding, Protein Stability, Protein Transport, Thermodynamics
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2016
Despite broad biochemical relevance, our understanding of the physiochemical reactions that limit the assembly and cellular trafficking of integral membrane proteins remains superficial. In this work, we report the first experimental assessment of the relationship between the conformational stability of a eukaryotic membrane protein and the degree to which it is retained by cellular quality control in the secretory pathway. We quantitatively assessed both the conformational equilibrium and cellular trafficking of 12 variants of the α-helical membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22), the intracellular misfolding of which is known to cause peripheral neuropathies associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). We show that the extent to which these mutations influence the energetics of Zn(II)-mediated PMP22 folding is proportional to the observed reduction in cellular trafficking efficiency. Strikingly, quantitative analyses also reveal that the reduction of motor nerve conduction velocities in affected patients is proportional to the extent of the mutagenic destabilization. This finding provides compelling evidence that the effects of these mutations on the energetics of PMP22 folding lie at the heart of the molecular basis of CMT. These findings highlight conformational stability as a key factor governing membrane protein biogenesis and suggest novel therapeutic strategies for CMT.
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17 MeSH Terms
Patterns and severity of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
Lavoie Smith EM, Li L, Chiang C, Thomas K, Hutchinson RJ, Wells EM, Ho RH, Skiles J, Chakraborty A, Bridges CM, Renbarger J
(2015) J Peripher Nerv Syst 20: 37-46
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Pain Measurement, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Severity of Illness Index, Vincristine
Show Abstract · Added November 10, 2016
Vincristine, a critical component of combination chemotherapy treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), can lead to vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy (VIPN). Longitudinal VIPN assessments were obtained over 12 months from newly diagnosed children with ALL (N = 128) aged 1-18 years who received vincristine at one of four academic children's hospitals. VIPN assessments were obtained using the Total Neuropathy Score-Pediatric Vincristine (TNS©-PV), National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE©), Balis© grading scale, and Pediatric Neuropathic Pain Scale©-Five (PNPS©-5). Of children who provided a full TNS©-PV score, 85/109 (78%) developed VIPN (TNS©-PV ≥4). Mean TNS©-PV, grading scale, and pain scores were low. CTCAE©-derived grades 3 and 4 sensory and motor VIPN occurred in 1.6%/0%, and 1.9%/0% of subjects, respectively. VIPN did not resolve in months 8-12 despite decreasing dose density. VIPN was worse in older children. Partition cluster analysis revealed 2-3 patient clusters; one cluster (n = 14) experienced severe VIPN. In this population, VIPN occurs more commonly than previous research suggests, persists throughout the first year of treatment, and can be severe.
© 2015 Peripheral Nerve Society.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
The homology model of PMP22 suggests mutations resulting in peripheral neuropathy disrupt transmembrane helix packing.
Mittendorf KF, Kroncke BM, Meiler J, Sanders CR
(2014) Biochemistry 53: 6139-41
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Claudins, Crystallography, X-Ray, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Myelin Proteins, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a tetraspan membrane protein strongly expressed in myelinating Schwann cells of the peripheral nervous system. Myriad missense mutations in PMP22 result in varying degrees of peripheral neuropathy. We used Rosetta 3.5 to generate a homology model of PMP22 based on the recently published crystal structure of claudin-15. The model suggests that several mutations known to result in neuropathy act by disrupting transmembrane helix packing interactions. Our model also supports suggestions from previous studies that the first transmembrane helix is not tightly associated with the rest of the helical bundle.
1 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Deletion of KCC3 in parvalbumin neurons leads to locomotor deficit in a conditional mouse model of peripheral neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum.
Ding J, Delpire E
(2014) Behav Brain Res 274: 128-36
MeSH Terms: Agenesis of Corpus Callosum, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Exploratory Behavior, Ganglia, Spinal, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Motor Activity, Movement Disorders, Neurons, Parvalbumins, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Phosphopyruvate Hydratase, Psychomotor Performance, Reaction Time, Spinal Cord, Symporters
Show Abstract · Added November 25, 2014
Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC or ACCPN) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the disruption of the SLC12A6 gene, which encodes the K-Cl cotransporter-3 (KCC3). A ubiquitous deletion of KCC3 in mice leads to severe locomotor deficits similar to ACCPN patients. However, the underlying pathological mechanism leading to the disease remains unclear. Even though a recent study suggests that the neuropathic features of ACCPN are mostly due to neuronal loss of KCC3, the specific cell type responsible for the disease is still unknown. Here we established four tissue specific KCC3 knockout mouse lines to explore the cell population origin of ACCPN. Our results showed that the loss of KCC3 in parvalbumin-positive neurons led to significant locomotor deficit, suggesting a crucial role of these neurons in the development of the locomotor deficit. Interestingly, mice in which KCC3 deletion was driven by the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) did not develop any phenotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that nociceptive neurons targeted with Nav1.8-driven CRE and Schwann cells targeted with a desert hedgehog-driven CRE were not involved in the development of ACCPN. Together, these results establish that the parvalbumin-positive neuronal population is an important player in the pathogenic development of ACCPN.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
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18 MeSH Terms
Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity and ototoxicity: new paradigms for translational genomics.
Travis LB, Fossa SD, Sesso HD, Frisina RD, Herrmann DN, Beard CJ, Feldman DR, Pagliaro LC, Miller RC, Vaughn DJ, Einhorn LH, Cox NJ, Dolan ME, Platinum Study Group
(2014) J Natl Cancer Inst 106:
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Humans, Neurotoxicity Syndromes, Peripheral Nervous System Diseases, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Translational Medical Research
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
In view of advances in early detection and treatment, the 5-year relative survival rate for all cancer patients combined is now approximately 66%. As a result, there are more than 13.7 million cancer survivors in the United States, with this number increasing by 2% annually. For many patients, improvements in survival have been countered by therapy-associated adverse effects that may seriously impair long-term functional status, workplace productivity, and quality of life. Approximately 20% to 40% of cancer patients given neurotoxic chemotherapy develop chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity (CIPN), which represents one of the most common and potentially permanent nonhematologic side effects of chemotherapy. Permanent bilateral hearing loss and/or tinnitus can result from several ototoxic therapies, including cisplatin- or carboplatin-based chemotherapy. CIPN and ototoxicity represent important challenges because of the lack of means for effective prevention, mitigation, or a priori identification of high-risk patients, and few studies have applied modern genomic approaches to understand underlying mechanisms/pathways. Translational genomics, including cell-based models, now offer opportunities to make inroads for the first time to develop preventive and interventional strategies for CIPN, ototoxicity, and other treatment-related complications. This commentary provides current perspective on a successful research strategy, with a focus on cisplatin, developed by an experienced, transdisciplinary group of researchers and clinicians, representing pharmacogenomics, statistical genetics, neurology, hearing science, medical oncology, epidemiology, and cancer survivorship. Principles outlined herein are applicable to the construction of research programs in translational genomics with strong clinical relevance and highlight unprecedented opportunities to understand, prevent, and treat long-term treatment-related morbidities.
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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8 MeSH Terms