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Friendship and social functioning following early institutional rearing: The role of ADHD symptoms.
Humphreys KL, Gabard-Durnam L, Goff B, Telzer EH, Flannery J, Gee DG, Park V, Lee SS, Tottenham N
(2019) Dev Psychopathol 31: 1477-1487
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Aggression, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Child, Child, Institutionalized, Female, Friends, Humans, Male, Peer Group, Social Adjustment, Social Behavior
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Early institutional rearing is associated with increased risk for subsequent peer relationship difficulties, but the underlying mechanisms have not been identified. Friendship characteristics, social behaviors with peers, normed assessments of social problems, and social cue use were assessed in 142 children (mean age = 10.06, SD = 2.02; range 7-13 years), of whom 67 were previously institutionalized (PI), and 75 were raised by their biological families. Anxiety and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, often elevated among PI children, were examined as potential mediators of PI status and baseline social functioning and longitudinal follow-ups (2 and 4 years later). Twenty-seven percent of PI children fell above the Child Behavior Checklist Social Problems cutoff. An examination of specific social behaviors with peers indicated that PI and comparison children did not differ in empathic concern or peer social approach, though parents were more likely to endorse aggression/overarousal as a reason that PI children might struggle with friendships. Comparison children outperformed PI children in computerized testing of social cue use learning. Finally, across these measures, social difficulties exhibited in the PI group were mediated by ADHD symptoms with predicted social problems assessed 4 years later. These findings show that, when PI children struggle with friendships, mechanisms involving attention and behavior regulation are likely contributors.
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Misuse of stimulant medication among college students: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis.
Benson K, Flory K, Humphreys KL, Lee SS
(2015) Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 18: 50-76
MeSH Terms: Achievement, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Central Nervous System Stimulants, College Fraternities and Sororities, Humans, Motivation, Peer Group, Prescription Drug Misuse, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Students, Substance-Related Disorders, Universities
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
The misuse of stimulant medication among college students is a prevalent and growing problem. The purpose of this review and meta-analysis is to summarize the current research on rates and demographic and psychosocial correlates of stimulant medication misuse among college students, to provide methodological guidance and other ideas for future research, and to provide some preliminary suggestions for preventing and reducing misuse on college campuses. Random-effects meta-analysis found that the rate of stimulant medication misuse among college students was estimated at 17 % (95 % CI [0.13, 0.23], p < .001) and identified several psychological variables that differentiated misusers and nonusers, including symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, problems associated with alcohol use, and marijuana use. A qualitative review of the literature also revealed that Greek organization membership, academic performance, and other substance use were associated with misuse. Students are misusing primarily for academic reasons, and the most common source for obtaining stimulant medication is peers with prescriptions. Interpretation of findings is complicated by the lack of a standard misuse definition as well as validated tools for measuring stimulant misuse. The relation between stimulant medication misuse and extra curricular participation, academic outcomes, depression, and eating disorders requires further investigation, as do the reasons why students divert or misuse and whether policies on college campuses contribute to the high rates of misuse among students. Future research should also work to develop and implement effective prevention strategies for reducing the diversion and misuse of stimulant medication on college campuses.
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Efficacy of peer-led interventions to reduce unprotected anal intercourse among men who have sex with men: a meta-analysis.
Ye S, Yin L, Amico R, Simoni J, Vermund S, Ruan Y, Shao Y, Qian HZ
(2014) PLoS One 9: e90788
MeSH Terms: Anal Canal, Coitus, Homosexuality, Male, Humans, Male, Peer Group, Publication Bias, Unsafe Sex
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2014
OBJECTIVE - To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of peer-led interventions in reducing unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) among men who have sex with men (MSM).
METHODS - Randomized clinical trials (RCTs), quasi-experimental studies, pre- and post-intervention studies without control groups, and serial cross-sectional assessments involving peers delivering interventions among MSM and published as of February 2012 were identified by systematically searching 13 electronic databases and cross-referencing. Effect sizes (ES) were calculated as the changes of standardized mean difference (SMD) in UAI between groups or pre-post intervention.
RESULTS - A total of 22 studies met the eligibility criteria, including five RCTs, six quasi-experimental studies, six pre-and-post intervention studies, and five serial cross-sectional intervention studies. We used 15 individual studies including 17 interventions for overall ES calculation; peer-led interventions reduced UAI with any sexual partners in meta-analysis (mean ES: -0.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.41, -0.13; P<0.01). Subgroup analyses demonstrated a statistically significant reduction on UAI in quasi-experimental studies (mean ES: -0.30; 95% CI: -0.50, -0.09; P = 0.01) and serial cross-sectional intervention studies (mean ES: -0.33; 95% CI: -0.57, -0.09; P = 0.01), but non-significant reduction in RCTs (mean ES: -0.15; 95% CI: -0.36, 0.07; P = 0.18) or pre- and post-intervention studies (mean ES: -0.29; 95% CI: -0.69, 0.11; P = 0.15). Heterogeneity was large across these 15 studies (I2 = 77.5%; P<0.01), largely due to pre-and-post intervention studies and serial cross-sectional intervention studies.
CONCLUSIONS - Peer-led HIV prevention interventions reduced the overall UAI among MSM, but the efficacy varied by study design. More RCTs are needed to evaluate the effect of peer-led interventions while minimizing potential bias.
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8 MeSH Terms
Biobehavioral profiles of arousal and social motivation in autism spectrum disorders.
Corbett BA, Swain DM, Newsom C, Wang L, Song Y, Edgerton D
(2014) J Child Psychol Psychiatry 55: 924-34
MeSH Terms: Arousal, Child, Child Development Disorders, Pervasive, Female, Humans, Hydrocortisone, Male, Motivation, Peer Group, Play and Playthings, Saliva, Social Behavior, Stress, Psychological, Surveys and Questionnaires, Wechsler Scales
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
BACKGROUND - Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are impaired in social communication and interaction with peers, which may reflect diminished social motivation. Many children with ASD show enhanced stress when playing with other children. This study investigated social and stress profiles of children with ASD during play.
METHODS - We utilized a peer interaction paradigm in a natural playground setting with 66 unmedicated, prepubertal, children aged 8-12 years [38 with ASD, 28 with typical development (TD)]. Salivary cortisol was collected before and after a 20-min playground interaction that was divided into periods of free and solicited play facilitated by a confederate child. Statistical analyses included Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, mixed effects models, and Spearman correlations to assess the between-group differences in social and stress functioning, identify stress responders, and explore associations between variables, respectively.
RESULTS - There were no differences between the groups during unsolicited free play; however, during solicited play by the confederate, significant differences emerged such that children with ASD engaged in fewer verbal interactions and more self-play than the TD group. Regarding physiological arousal, children with ASD as a group showed relatively higher cortisol in response to social play; however, there was a broad range of responses. Moreover, those with the highest cortisol levels engaged in less social communication.
CONCLUSIONS - The social interaction of children with ASD can be facilitated by peer solicitation; however, it may be accompanied by increased stress. The children with ASD that have the highest level of cortisol show less social motivation; yet, it is unclear if it reflects an underlying state of heightened arousal or enhanced reactivity to social engagement, or both.
© 2013 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2013 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.
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15 MeSH Terms
Improvement in social deficits in autism spectrum disorders using a theatre-based, peer-mediated intervention.
Corbett BA, Swain DM, Coke C, Simon D, Newsom C, Houchins-Juarez N, Jenson A, Wang L, Song Y
(2014) Autism Res 7: 4-16
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Arousal, Awareness, Behavior Therapy, Camping, Child, Child Development Disorders, Pervasive, Emotional Intelligence, Facial Expression, Female, Humans, Hydrocortisone, Interpersonal Relations, Male, Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care, Peer Group, Psychodrama, Social Behavior Disorders, Social Environment, Social Perception, Theory of Mind
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
Social Emotional NeuroScience Endocrinology Theatre is a novel intervention program aimed at improving reciprocal social interaction in youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) using behavioral strategies and theatrical techniques in a peer-mediated model. Previous research using a 3-month model showed improvement in face perception, social interaction, and reductions in stress. The current study assessed a 2-week summer camp model. Typically developing peers were trained and paired with ASD youth (8-17 years). Social perception and interaction skills were measured before and after treatment using neuropsychological and parental measures. Behavioral coding by reliable, independent raters was conducted within the treatment context (theatre) and outside the setting (playground). Salivary cortisol levels to assess physiological arousal were measured across contexts (home, theatre, and playground). A pretest-posttest design for within-group comparisons was used, and prespecified pairwise comparisons were achieved using a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Significant differences were observed in face processing, social awareness, and social cognition (P < 0.05). Duration of interaction with familiar peers increased significantly over the course of treatment (P < 0.05), while engagement with novel peers outside the treatment setting remained stable. Cortisol levels rose on the first day of camp compared with home values yet declined by the end of treatment and further reduced during posttreatment play with peers. Results corroborate previous findings that the peer-mediated theatre program contributes to improvement in core social deficits in ASD using a short-term, summer camp treatment model. Future studies will explore treatment length and peer familiarity to optimize and generalize gains.
© 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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21 MeSH Terms
The association of ADHD and depression: mediation by peer problems and parent-child difficulties in two complementary samples.
Humphreys KL, Katz SJ, Lee SS, Hammen C, Brennan PA, Najman JM
(2013) J Abnorm Psychol 122: 854-867
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Child, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Depressive Disorder, Educational Measurement, Female, Humans, Los Angeles, Male, Models, Psychological, Parent-Child Relations, Peer Group, Prospective Studies, Queensland, Sex Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at increased risk for the development of depression, with evidence that peer and academic difficulties mediate predictions of later depression from ADHD. In the present study, we hypothesized that parent-child relationship difficulties may be an additional potential mediator of this association. Academic, peer, and parent-child functioning were tested as mediators of the association of attention problems and depression in two distinctly different yet complementary samples. Study 1 was a cross-sectional sample of 5- to 10-year-old children (N = 230) with and without ADHD. Study 2 was a prospective longitudinal sample of 472 youth, followed prospectively from birth to age 20 years, at risk for depression. Despite differences in age, measures, and designs, both studies implicated peer and parent-child problems as unique mediators of depressive symptoms, whereas academic difficulties did not uniquely mediate the ADHD-depression association. Furthermore, inattention symptoms, but not hyperactivity, predicted depressive symptoms via the disruption of interpersonal functioning. The inclusion of oppositional defiant disorder into models impacted results and supported its independent role in parent-child problems. Implications include support for interventions that target interpersonal competence, which may effectively reduce the risk of depression among children with ADHD.
PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.
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Men on the move: a pilot program to increase physical activity among African American men.
Griffith DM, Allen JO, Johnson-Lawrence V, Langford A
(2014) Health Educ Behav 41: 164-72
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Community-Institutional Relations, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Male, Michigan, Middle Aged, Motivation, Motor Activity, Peer Group, Physical Fitness, Pilot Projects, Self Efficacy, Social Support
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Despite the important contribution increasing physical activity levels may play in reducing chronic disease morbidity and mortality, there is a paucity of interventions and research indicating how to improve physical activity levels in African American men. Men on the Move was a pilot study to increase African American men's levels of physical activity by improving access to age and ability-appropriate, male-focused physical activity opportunities and facilitating access to social support from male peers. Forty-one African American men ages 35 to 70 enrolled (mean age = 53.8). Groups of 5 to 10 men met once a week with a certified personal trainer for 10 weeks. Each meeting addressed barriers to physical activity, provided men with community resources, and incorporated activities that promoted flexibility, strength, balance, and conditioning. Improvements (p < .05) were detected for the following outcome measures: perceived self-efficacy to sustain physical activity, endurance, overall health status, and stress level. Physiological and fitness outcome measures improved, although not to significant levels. Whereas 40% of the men met the recommendation of 150 minutes of moderate or vigorous physical activity weekly at baseline, 68% of the men met this recommendation by the end of the project. These positive results attest to the feasibility of successfully engaging middle-aged and older African American men in a physical activity intervention, and our findings demonstrate the initial efficacy of this intervention approach. More research is needed that includes a more intensive intervention and one that helps motivate men to be physically active outside of the structured, small-group sessions.
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16 MeSH Terms
Male peer influence on African American men's motivation for physical activity: men's and women's perspectives.
Griffith DM, King A, Ober Allen J
(2013) Am J Mens Health 7: 169-78
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Exercise, Female, Focus Groups, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Male, Michigan, Middle Aged, Motivation, Peer Group, Power, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Thematic analysis of data from nine exploratory focus groups conducted with 71 middle-aged and older African American men and eight focus groups with 77 key women in their lives revealed how social norms and modeling of physical activity influenced men's motivation to exercise. Both men and women identified male peers as an important source of ideas, encouragement, and support to initiate and sustain physical activity, yet sedentary peers also could contribute to men being less motivated to be active. The primary difference in men's and women's perspectives was that men attributed their decline in activity levels to difficulties in finding time for physical activity, whereas women attributed sedentary lifestyles to an increase in men's physical illnesses and ailments. Men's participation in team sports and overall activity levels diminished with age. Peer social support can be critical for interventions to help African American men engage in and sustain physical activity.
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14 MeSH Terms
Medical student education program in Alzheimer's disease: the PAIRS Program.
Jefferson AL, Cantwell NG, Byerly LK, Morhardt D
(2012) BMC Med Educ 12: 80
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Alzheimer Disease, Attitude of Health Personnel, Boston, Career Choice, Caregivers, Clinical Competence, Communication, Cooperative Behavior, Cost of Illness, Curriculum, Education, Medical, Undergraduate, Educational Measurement, Female, Geriatrics, Humans, Male, Peer Group, Physician-Patient Relations, Professional-Family Relations, School Admission Criteria, Schools, Medical, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
BACKGROUND - As life expectancy increases, dementia incidence will also increase, creating a greater need for physicians well-trained to provide integrated geriatric care. However, research suggests medical students have limited knowledge or interest in pursuing geriatric or dementia care. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the PAIRS Program and its effectiveness in enhancing medical education as a service-learning activity and replication model for the Buddy ProgramTM.
METHODS - Between 2007 and 2011, four consecutive classes of first year Boston University School of Medicine students (n = 45; 24 ± 3 years, 58% female, 53% White) participated in a year-long program in which they were paired with a patient with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD). Assessments included pre- and post-program dementia knowledge tests and a post-program reflective essay.
RESULTS - Program completion was 100% (n = 45). A paired-sample t-test revealed a modest improvement in dementia knowledge post-program (p < 0.001). Using qualitative coding methods, 12 overarching themes emerged from the students' reflective essays, such as observing care partner burden, reporting a human side to AD, reporting experiences from the program that will impact future clinical practice, and obtaining a greater understanding of AD.
CONCLUSIONS - Quantitative and qualitative findings suggest that the PAIRS Program can enhance the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and positive attitudes regarding geriatric healthcare in future generations of physicians, a skill set that is becoming increasingly relevant in light of the rapidly aging population. Furthermore, results suggest that The Buddy ProgramTM model can be successfully replicated.
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Peer relationships of bereaved siblings and comparison classmates after a child's death from cancer.
Gerhardt CA, Fairclough DL, Grossenbacher JC, Barrera M, Gilmer MJ, Foster TL, Compas BE, Davies B, Hogan NS, Vannatta K
(2012) J Pediatr Psychol 37: 209-19
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Age Factors, Bereavement, Child, Female, Humans, Interpersonal Relations, Male, Neoplasms, Peer Group, Schools, Sex Factors, Siblings, Social Behavior, Social Support
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
OBJECTIVES - To compare peer relationships among bereaved siblings and matched classmates, and to examine gender, grade level, and time since death as moderators.
METHODS - Families were recruited from cancer registries at four hospitals 3-12 months after a child's death. Measures of social behavior and peer acceptance were completed by children in the classrooms of 105 bereaved siblings (ages 8-17 years). Teachers also reported on children's social behavior. Three classmates were matched for gender, race, and age to each bereaved sibling to form a comparison group (n = 311).
RESULTS - Teachers reported bereaved siblings were more prosocial than comparison classmates. Peers perceived bereaved boys as more sensitive-isolated and victimized, while bereaved siblings in elementary grades were perceived by peers as less prosocial, more sensitive-isolated, less accepted, and as having fewer friends. Peers and teachers viewed bereaved siblings in middle/high school grades as higher on leadership-popularity.
CONCLUSIONS - Bereaved siblings who were male and in elementary grades were more vulnerable to social difficulties, while those in middle/high school may exhibit some strengths. Ongoing research to inform the development of interventions for bereaved siblings is warranted.
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15 MeSH Terms