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Updated Recommendations on the Diagnosis, Management, and Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria for Patients With Renal Medullary Carcinoma.
Msaouel P, Hong AL, Mullen EA, Atkins MB, Walker CL, Lee CH, Carden MA, Genovese G, Linehan WM, Rao P, Merino MJ, Grodman H, Dome JS, Fernandez CV, Geller JI, Apolo AB, Daw NC, Hodges HC, Moxey-Mims M, Wei D, Bottaro DP, Staehler M, Karam JA, Rathmell WK, Tannir NM
(2019) Clin Genitourin Cancer 17: 1-6
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Medullary, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Clinical Trials as Topic, Databases, Factual, Eligibility Determination, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Patient Selection, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prognosis
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is one of the most aggressive renal cell carcinomas. It predominantly afflicts young adults and adolescents with sickle cell trait and other sickle hemoglobinopathies, and is refractory to targeted and antiangiogenic therapies used in patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma. Platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy is the mainstay for RMC treatment. On the basis of recent advances in the diagnosis, management, and clinical trial development for RMC, a panel of experts met in October 2017 and developed updated consensus recommendations to inform clinicians, researchers, and patients. Because RMC often aggressively recurs while patients are still recovering from nephrectomy, upfront chemotherapy should be considered for most patients, including those with localized disease. After safety and dosing information has been established in adults, phase II and III trials enrolling patients with RMC should allow patients aged 12 years and older to be accrued. Patients with the very rare unclassified renal cell carcinoma with medullary phenotype variant should be included in RMC trials. Medical providers should be aware that RMC can afflict subjects of all races, and not only those of African descent, and that the presence of sickle cell trait, or of other sickle hemoglobinopathies, can affect drug responses and toxicity.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Translating Knowledge Into Therapy for Acute Kidney Injury.
de Caestecker M, Harris R
(2018) Semin Nephrol 38: 88-97
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Biopsy, Clinical Trials as Topic, Humans, Kidney, Patient Selection, Phenotype, Precision Medicine, Translational Medical Research
Show Abstract · Added October 23, 2018
No therapies have been shown to improve outcomes in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with AKI this represents an important unmet medical need. A common feature of all of the therapeutic development efforts for AKI is that none were driven by target selection or preclinical modeling that was based primarily on human data. This is important when considering a heterogeneous and dynamic condition such as AKI, in which in the absence of more accurate molecular classifications, clinical cohorts are likely to include patients with different types of injury at different stages in the injury and repair continuum. The National Institutes of Health precision medicine initiative offers an opportunity to address this. By creating a molecular tissue atlas of AKI, defining patient subgroups, and identifying critical cells and pathways involved in human AKI, this initiative has the potential to transform our current approach to therapeutic discovery. In this review, we discuss the opportunities and challenges that this initiative presents, with a specific focus on AKI, what additional efforts will be needed to apply these discoveries to therapeutic development, and how we believe this effort might lead to the development of new therapeutics for subsets of patients with AKI.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Multisite Investigation of Outcomes With Implementation of CYP2C19 Genotype-Guided Antiplatelet Therapy After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.
Cavallari LH, Lee CR, Beitelshees AL, Cooper-DeHoff RM, Duarte JD, Voora D, Kimmel SE, McDonough CW, Gong Y, Dave CV, Pratt VM, Alestock TD, Anderson RD, Alsip J, Ardati AK, Brott BC, Brown L, Chumnumwat S, Clare-Salzler MJ, Coons JC, Denny JC, Dillon C, Elsey AR, Hamadeh IS, Harada S, Hillegass WB, Hines L, Horenstein RB, Howell LA, Jeng LJB, Kelemen MD, Lee YM, Magvanjav O, Montasser M, Nelson DR, Nutescu EA, Nwaba DC, Pakyz RE, Palmer K, Peterson JF, Pollin TI, Quinn AH, Robinson SW, Schub J, Skaar TC, Smith DM, Sriramoju VB, Starostik P, Stys TP, Stevenson JM, Varunok N, Vesely MR, Wake DT, Weck KE, Weitzel KW, Wilke RA, Willig J, Zhao RY, Kreutz RP, Stouffer GA, Empey PE, Limdi NA, Shuldiner AR, Winterstein AG, Johnson JA, IGNITE Network
(2018) JACC Cardiovasc Interv 11: 181-191
MeSH Terms: Aged, Clinical Decision-Making, Clopidogrel, Cytochrome P-450 CYP2C19, Drug Resistance, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Selection, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Pharmacogenetics, Pharmacogenomic Testing, Pharmacogenomic Variants, Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors, Prasugrel Hydrochloride, Predictive Value of Tests, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Ticagrelor, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
OBJECTIVES - This multicenter pragmatic investigation assessed outcomes following clinical implementation of CYP2C19 genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
BACKGROUND - CYP2C19 loss-of-function alleles impair clopidogrel effectiveness after PCI.
METHODS - After clinical genotyping, each institution recommended alternative antiplatelet therapy (prasugrel, ticagrelor) in PCI patients with a loss-of-function allele. Major adverse cardiovascular events (defined as myocardial infarction, stroke, or death) within 12 months of PCI were compared between patients with a loss-of-function allele prescribed clopidogrel versus alternative therapy. Risk was also compared between patients without a loss-of-function allele and loss-of-function allele carriers prescribed alternative therapy. Cox regression was performed, adjusting for group differences with inverse probability of treatment weights.
RESULTS - Among 1,815 patients, 572 (31.5%) had a loss-of-function allele. The risk for major adverse cardiovascular events was significantly higher in patients with a loss-of-function allele prescribed clopidogrel versus alternative therapy (23.4 vs. 8.7 per 100 patient-years; adjusted hazard ratio: 2.26; 95% confidence interval: 1.18 to 4.32; p = 0.013). Similar results were observed among 1,210 patients with acute coronary syndromes at the time of PCI (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.87; 95% confidence interval: 1.35 to 6.09; p = 0.013). There was no difference in major adverse cardiovascular events between patients without a loss-of-function allele and loss-of-function allele carriers prescribed alternative therapy (adjusted hazard ratio: 1.14; 95% confidence interval: 0.69 to 1.88; p = 0.60).
CONCLUSIONS - These data from real-world observations demonstrate a higher risk for cardiovascular events in patients with a CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele if clopidogrel versus alternative therapy is prescribed. A future randomized study of genotype-guided antiplatelet therapy may be of value.
Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Transplantation Versus Resection for Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma: An Argument for Shifting Treatment Paradigms for Resectable Disease.
Ethun CG, Lopez-Aguiar AG, Anderson DJ, Adams AB, Fields RC, Doyle MB, Chapman WC, Krasnick BA, Weber SM, Mezrich JD, Salem A, Pawlik TM, Poultsides G, Tran TB, Idrees K, Isom CA, Martin RCG, Scoggins CR, Shen P, Mogal HD, Schmidt C, Beal E, Hatzaras I, Shenoy R, Cardona K, Maithel SK
(2018) Ann Surg 267: 797-805
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Bile Duct Neoplasms, Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hepatectomy, Humans, Klatskin Tumor, Liver Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Selection, Retrospective Studies, Survival Rate, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
OBJECTIVE - To investigate the influence of type of surgery (transplant vs resection) on overall survival (OS) in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (H-CCA).
BACKGROUND - Outcomes after resection for H-CCA are poor, yet transplantation is currently only reserved for well-selected patients with unresectable disease.
METHODS - All patients with H-CCA who underwent resection from 2000 to 2015 at 10 institutions were included. Three institutions additionally had active H-CCA transplant protocols with similar selection criteria over similar time periods.
RESULTS - Of 304 patients with suspected H-CCA, 234 underwent attempted resection and 70 were enrolled in a transplant protocol. Excluding incomplete/R2 resections (n = 43), patients who were enrolled, but did not undergo transplant (n = 24), and transplants without confirmed H-CCA diagnoses (n = 5), 191 patients underwent curative-intent resection and 41 curative-intent transplant. Compared with resection, transplant patients were younger (52 vs 65 years; P < 0.001), and more frequently had primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC; 61% vs 2%; P < 0.001) and received chemotherapy and/or radiation (98% vs 57%; P < 0.001). Groups were otherwise similar in demographics and comorbidities. Patients who underwent transplant for confirmed H-CCA diagnosis had improved OS compared with resection (3-year: 72% vs 33%; 5-year: 64% vs 18%; P < 0.001). Among patients who underwent resection for tumors <3 cm with lymph-node negative disease, and excluding PSC patients, transplant was still associated with improved OS (3-year: 54% vs 44%; 5-year: 54% vs 29%; P = 0.03). Transplant remained associated with improved survival on intention-to-treat analysis, even after accounting for tumor size, lymph node status, and PSC (P = 0.049).
CONCLUSIONS - Resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma that meets criteria for transplantation (<3 cm, lymph-node negative disease) is associated with substantially decreased survival compared to transplant for the same criteria with unresectable disease. Prospective trials are needed and justified.
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Colorectal Cancer Cell Line Proteomes Are Representative of Primary Tumors and Predict Drug Sensitivity.
Wang J, Mouradov D, Wang X, Jorissen RN, Chambers MC, Zimmerman LJ, Vasaikar S, Love CG, Li S, Lowes K, Leuchowius KJ, Jousset H, Weinstock J, Yau C, Mariadason J, Shi Z, Ban Y, Chen X, Coffey RJC, Slebos RJC, Burgess AW, Liebler DC, Zhang B, Sieber OM
(2017) Gastroenterology 153: 1082-1095
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cell Line, Tumor, Chromatography, Liquid, Colorectal Neoplasms, Databases, Protein, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Mutation, Neoplasm Proteins, Patient Selection, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Precision Medicine, Proteome, Proteomics, Signal Transduction, Stromal Cells, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Transcriptome, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added July 17, 2017
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - Proteomics holds promise for individualizing cancer treatment. We analyzed to what extent the proteomic landscape of human colorectal cancer (CRC) is maintained in established CRC cell lines and the utility of proteomics for predicting therapeutic responses.
METHODS - Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses were performed on 44 CRC cell lines, compared against primary CRCs (n=95) and normal tissues (n=60), and integrated with genomic and drug sensitivity data.
RESULTS - Cell lines mirrored the proteomic aberrations of primary tumors, in particular for intrinsic programs. Tumor relationships of protein expression with DNA copy number aberrations and signatures of post-transcriptional regulation were recapitulated in cell lines. The 5 proteomic subtypes previously identified in tumors were represented among cell lines. Nonetheless, systematic differences between cell line and tumor proteomes were apparent, attributable to stroma, extrinsic signaling, and growth conditions. Contribution of tumor stroma obscured signatures of DNA mismatch repair identified in cell lines with a hypermutation phenotype. Global proteomic data showed improved utility for predicting both known drug-target relationships and overall drug sensitivity as compared with genomic or transcriptomic measurements. Inhibition of targetable proteins associated with drug responses further identified corresponding synergistic or antagonistic drug combinations. Our data provide evidence for CRC proteomic subtype-specific drug responses.
CONCLUSIONS - Proteomes of established CRC cell line are representative of primary tumors. Proteomic data tend to exhibit improved prediction of drug sensitivity as compared with genomic and transcriptomic profiles. Our integrative proteogenomic analysis highlights the potential of proteome profiling to inform personalized cancer medicine.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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23 MeSH Terms
Surgical necrotizing enterocolitis.
Robinson JR, Rellinger EJ, Hatch LD, Weitkamp JH, Speck KE, Danko M, Blakely ML
(2017) Semin Perinatol 41: 70-79
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Drainage, Enterocolitis, Necrotizing, Enterostomy, Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins, Feces, Humans, Infant, Extremely Premature, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Diseases, Infant, Very Low Birth Weight, Laparotomy, Leukocyte L1 Antigen Complex, Patient Selection, Predictive Value of Tests, S100A12 Protein, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added January 16, 2017
Although currently available data are variable, it appears that the incidence of surgical necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) has not decreased significantly over the past decade. Pneumoperitoneum and clinical deterioration despite maximal medical therapy remain the most common indications for operative treatment. Robust studies linking outcomes with specific indications for operation are lacking. Promising biomarkers for severe NEC include fecal calprotectin and S100A12; serum fatty acid-binding protein; and urine biomarkers. Recent advances in ultrasonography make this imaging modality more useful in identifying surgical NEC and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is being actively studied. Another fairly recent finding is that regionalization of care for infants with NEC likely improves outcomes. The neurodevelopmental outcomes after surgical treatment are known to be poor. A randomized trial near completion will provide robust data regarding neurodevelopmental outcomes after laparotomy versus drainage as the initial operative treatment for severe NEC.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Immunotherapy: A promising approach to reverse sepsis-induced immunosuppression.
Patil NK, Bohannon JK, Sherwood ER
(2016) Pharmacol Res 111: 688-702
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Biomarkers, Humans, Immunocompromised Host, Immunologic Factors, Immunotherapy, Patient Selection, Predictive Value of Tests, Sepsis, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added December 13, 2016
Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by dysregulated host responses to infection (Third International Consensus definition for Sepsis and septic shock). Despite decades of research, sepsis remains the leading cause of death in intensive care units. More than 40 clinical trials, most of which have targeted the sepsis-associated pro-inflammatory response, have failed. Thus, antibiotics and fluid resuscitation remain the mainstays of supportive care and there is intense need to discover and develop novel, targeted therapies to treat sepsis. Both pre-clinical and clinical studies over the past decade demonstrate unequivocally that sepsis not only causes hyper-inflammation, but also leads to simultaneous adaptive immune system dysfunction and impaired antimicrobial immunity. Evidences for immunosuppression include immune cell depletion (T cells most affected), compromised T cell effector functions, T cell exhaustion, impaired antigen presentation, increased susceptibility to opportunistic nosocomial infections, dysregulated cytokine secretion, and reactivation of latent viruses. Therefore, targeting immunosuppression provides a logical approach to treat protracted sepsis. Numerous pre-clinical studies using immunomodulatory agents such as interleukin-7, anti-programmed cell death 1 antibody (anti-PD-1), anti-programmed cell death 1 ligand antibody (anti-PD-L1), and others have demonstrated reversal of T cell dysfunction and improved survival. Therefore, identifying immunosuppressed patients with the help of specific biomarkers and administering specific immunomodulators holds significant potential for sepsis therapy in the future. This review focusses on T cell dysfunction during sepsis and discusses the potential immunotherapeutic agents to boost T cell function during sepsis and improve host resistance to infection.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Parenteral Prostanoid Use at a Tertiary Referral Center: A Retrospective Cohort Study.
Hay BR, Pugh ME, Robbins IM, Hemnes AR
(2016) Chest 149: 660-6
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cause of Death, Cohort Studies, Comorbidity, Connective Tissue Diseases, Death, Sudden, Endothelin Receptor Antagonists, Familial Primary Pulmonary Hypertension, Female, Guideline Adherence, HIV Infections, Heart Defects, Congenital, Heart Failure, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Infusions, Parenteral, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Selection, Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibitors, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Prostaglandins, Quality Improvement, Retrospective Studies, Severity of Illness Index, Tertiary Care Centers
Show Abstract · Added March 8, 2020
BACKGROUND - Evidence-based guidelines recommend the use of parenteral prostaglandin (PP) therapy in patients with advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Despite this, many patients with PAH die without PP therapy. We sought to examine the frequency of PP use at a large referral center and characterize patients with PAH who died without receiving PP.
METHODS - We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort analysis of consecutive patients with PAH between 2008 and 2012. Clinical data and cause of death were compared between patients with PAH treated with PP (PAH-PP) and those who were not but were not documented as poor PP candidates (PAH-nonPP).
RESULTS - Of the 101 patients who received a diagnosis of PAH and died, 61 received PP therapy. Of the 40 patients not treated with PP, 10 did not have documented evaluations for PP therapy (PAH-nonPP) whereas 30 were not considered candidates or refused PP therapy. Compared with PAH-PP, PAH-nonPP had a longer 6-min walk distance, had a longer duration between time of diagnosis and date of worse functional class visit, were less likely to be diagnosed as functional class IV, and had significantly lower right atrial pressure. None of the PAH-nonPP died of progressive PAH.
CONCLUSIONS - We found that most patients who die with PAH are evaluated for PP therapy at a large referral center and the small minority of PAH-nonPP tended to have less severe disease and die of non-PAH-related causes. Our data suggest that at large pulmonary hypertension (PH) centers, the vast majority of patients who are appropriate candidates receive PP therapy.
Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Clinical implications of molecular heterogeneity in triple negative breast cancer.
Lehmann BD, Pietenpol JA
(2015) Breast 24 Suppl 2: S36-40
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Female, Genetic Heterogeneity, Humans, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Mutation, Patient Selection, Phenotype, Transcription, Genetic, Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a molecularly heterogeneous disease lacking recurrent targetable alterations and thus therapeutic advances have been challenging. The absence of ER, PR and HER2 amplifications, leaves combination chemotherapy as the standard of care treatment option in the adjuvant, neoadjuvant and metastatic settings. Recently, multiple studies have shed some light on the heterogeneity of TNBC and identified distinct transcriptional subtypes with unique biologies. Herein we review the molecular heterogeneity and the impact on previous and future clinical trials.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Improving the Effectiveness of Penicillin Allergy De-labeling.
Bourke J, Pavlos R, James I, Phillips E
(2015) J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 3: 365-34.e1
MeSH Terms: Administration, Oral, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Drug Hypersensitivity, Female, Guideline Adherence, Hospitals, Public, Humans, Intradermal Tests, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Selection, Penicillins, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Predictive Value of Tests, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Western Australia, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
BACKGROUND - Approximately 10-20% of hospitalized patients are labeled as penicillin allergic, and this is associated with significant health and economic costs.
OBJECTIVES - We looked at the effectiveness of penicillin allergy de-labeling in clinical practice with the aim of deriving risk stratification models to guide testing strategies.
METHODS - Consecutive patients aged 15 years or more, referred to a Western Australian public hospital drug allergy service between 2008 and 2013 for beta-lactam allergy, were included. Follow-up surveys were conducted. Results of skin prick testing and intradermal testing (SPT/IDT) and oral challenge (OC), and follow-up of post testing antibiotic usage were the main outcomes.
RESULTS - SPT/IDT was performed in 401 consecutive patients with immediate (IMM) (≤ 1 hour) (n = 151) and nonimmediate (NIM) (>1 hour) (n = 250) reactions. Of 341 patients, 42 (12.3%) were SPT/IDT+ to ≥ 1 penicillin reagents, including 35/114 (30.4%) in the IMM group and 7/227 (3.1%) in the NIM group (P < .0001). Of 355 SPT/IDT patients, 3 (0.8%), all in the IMM group, had nonserious positive OC reactions to single dose penicillin VK (SPT/IDT negative predictive value [NPV] 99.2%). Selective or unrestricted beta-lactam was recommended in almost 90% overall, including 238/250 (95.2%) in the NIM group and 126/151 (83.4%) in the IMM group (P = .0001). Of 182 patients, 137 (75.3%) were following the allergy label modifications (ALM) at the time of follow-up.
CONCLUSIONS - Penicillin SPT/IDT/OC safely de-labels penicillin-allergic patients and identifies selective beta-lactam allergies; however, incomplete adherence to ALM recommendations impairs effectiveness. Infrequent SPT/IDT+ and absent OC reactions in patients with NIM reactions suggest OC alone to be a safe and cost-effective de-labeling strategy that could improve the coverage of penicillin allergy de-labeling in lower risk populations.
Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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