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[F]fallypride characterization of striatal and extrastriatal D receptors in Parkinson's disease.
Stark AJ, Smith CT, Petersen KJ, Trujillo P, van Wouwe NC, Donahue MJ, Kessler RM, Deutch AY, Zald DH, Claassen DO
(2018) Neuroimage Clin 18: 433-442
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Benzamides, Brain Mapping, Corpus Striatum, Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Parkinson Disease, Positron-Emission Tomography, Receptors, Dopamine D2
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by widespread degeneration of monoaminergic (especially dopaminergic) networks, manifesting with a number of both motor and non-motor symptoms. Regional alterations to dopamine D receptors in PD patients are documented in striatal and some extrastriatal areas, and medications that target D receptors can improve motor and non-motor symptoms. However, data regarding the combined pattern of D receptor binding in both striatal and extrastriatal regions in PD are limited. We studied 35 PD patients off-medication and 31 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) using PET imaging with [F]fallypride, a high affinity D receptor ligand, to measure striatal and extrastriatal D nondisplaceable binding potential (BP). PD patients completed PET imaging in the off medication state, and motor severity was concurrently assessed. Voxel-wise evaluation between groups revealed significant BP reductions in PD patients in striatal and several extrastriatal regions, including the locus coeruleus and mesotemporal cortex. A region-of-interest (ROI) based approach quantified differences in dopamine D receptors, where reduced BP was noted in the globus pallidus, caudate, amygdala, hippocampus, ventral midbrain, and thalamus of PD patients relative to HC subjects. Motor severity positively correlated with D receptor density in the putamen and globus pallidus. These findings support the hypothesis that abnormal D expression occurs in regions related to both the motor and non-motor symptoms of PD, including areas richly invested with noradrenergic neurons.
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4 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Positron emission tomography in Parkinson's disease: insights into impulsivity.
Stark AJ, Claassen DO
(2017) Int Rev Psychiatry 29: 618-627
MeSH Terms: Aged, Behavior, Addictive, Dopamine, Dopamine Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Female, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Male, Middle Aged, Parkinson Disease, Positron-Emission Tomography, Ventral Striatum
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
This study reviews previous studies that employ positron emission tomography (PET) imaging assessments in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with and without Impulsive Compulsive Behaviours (ICB). This begins with a summary of the potential benefits and limitations of commonly utilized ligands, specifically D receptor and dopamine transporter ligands. Since previous findings emphasize the role of the ventral striatum in the manifestation of ICBs, this study attempts to relate these imaging findings to changes in behaviour, especially emphasizing work performed in substance abuse and addiction. Next, it reviews how increasing disease duration in PD can influence dopamine receptor expression, with an emphasis on differential striatal and extra-striatal changes that occur along the course of PD. Finally, it focuses on how extra-striatal changes, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and anterior cingulate, may influence the proficiency of behavioural regulation in PD. The discussion emphasizes the interaction of disease and medication effects on network-wide changes that occur in PD, and how these changes may result in behavioural dysregulation.
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12 MeSH Terms
Ventral striatal network connectivity reflects reward learning and behavior in patients with Parkinson's disease.
Petersen K, Van Wouwe N, Stark A, Lin YC, Kang H, Trujillo-Diaz P, Kessler R, Zald D, Donahue MJ, Claassen DO
(2018) Hum Brain Mapp 39: 509-521
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Antiparkinson Agents, Brain Mapping, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Dopamine Agonists, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Neuropsychological Tests, Oxygen, Parkinson Disease, Reward, Ventral Striatum
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
A subgroup of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients treated with dopaminergic therapy develop compulsive reward-driven behaviors, which can result in life-altering morbidity. The mesocorticolimbic dopamine network guides reward-motivated behavior; however, its role in this treatment-related behavioral phenotype is incompletely understood. Here, mesocorticolimbic network function in PD patients who develop impulsive and compulsive behaviors (ICB) in response to dopamine agonists was assessed using BOLD fMRI. The tested hypothesis was that network connectivity between the ventral striatum and the limbic cortex is elevated in patients with ICB and that reward-learning proficiency reflects the extent of mesocorticolimbic network connectivity. To evaluate this hypothesis, 3.0T BOLD-fMRI was applied to measure baseline functional connectivity on and off dopamine agonist therapy in age and sex-matched PD patients with (n = 19) or without (n = 18) ICB. An incentive-based task was administered to a subset of patients (n = 20) to quantify positively or negatively reinforced learning. Whole-brain voxelwise analyses and region-of-interest-based mixed linear effects modeling were performed. Elevated ventral striatal connectivity to the anterior cingulate gyrus (P = 0.013), orbitofrontal cortex (P = 0.034), insula (P = 0.044), putamen (P = 0.014), globus pallidus (P < 0.01), and thalamus (P < 0.01) was observed in patients with ICB. A strong trend for elevated amygdala-to-midbrain connectivity was found in ICB patients on dopamine agonist. Ventral striatum-to-subgenual cingulate connectivity correlated with reward learning (P < 0.01), but not with punishment-avoidance learning. These data indicate that PD-ICB patients have elevated network connectivity in the mesocorticolimbic network. Behaviorally, proficient reward-based learning is related to this enhanced limbic and ventral striatal connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 39:509-521, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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2 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Manganese and the Insulin-IGF Signaling Network in Huntington's Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Disorders.
Bryan MR, Bowman AB
(2017) Adv Neurobiol 18: 113-142
MeSH Terms: Alzheimer Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Animals, Autophagy, Brain, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Huntingtin Protein, Huntington Disease, Insulin, Manganese, Mitochondria, Neostriatum, Neural Stem Cells, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Parkinson Disease, Reactive Oxygen Species, Signal Transduction, Somatomedins
Show Abstract · Added April 11, 2018
Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease resulting in motor impairment and death in patients. Recently, several studies have demonstrated insulin or insulin-like growth factor (IGF) treatment in models of HD, resulting in potent amelioration of HD phenotypes via modulation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. Administration of IGF and insulin can rescue microtubule transport, metabolic function, and autophagy defects, resulting in clearance of Huntingtin (HTT) aggregates, restoration of mitochondrial function, amelioration of motor abnormalities, and enhanced survival. Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal to all biological systems but, in excess, can be toxic. Interestingly, several studies have revealed the insulin-mimetic effects of Mn-demonstrating Mn can activate several of the same metabolic kinases and increase peripheral and neuronal insulin and IGF-1 levels in rodent models. Separate studies have shown mouse and human striatal neuroprogenitor cell (NPC) models exhibit a deficit in cellular Mn uptake, indicative of a Mn deficiency. Furthermore, evidence from the literature reveals a striking overlap between cellular consequences of Mn deficiency (i.e., impaired function of Mn-dependent enzymes) and known HD endophenotypes including excitotoxicity, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and decreased mitochondrial function. Here we review published evidence supporting a hypothesis that (1) the potent effect of IGF or insulin treatment on HD models, (2) the insulin-mimetic effects of Mn, and (3) the newly discovered Mn-dependent perturbations in HD may all be functionally related. Together, this review will present the intriguing possibility that intricate regulatory cross-talk exists between Mn biology and/or toxicology and the insulin/IGF signaling pathways which may be deeply connected to HD pathology and, perhaps, other neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) and other neuropathological conditions.
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MeSH Terms
Impulse Control and Related Disorders in Parkinson's Disease.
Weintraub D, Claassen DO
(2017) Int Rev Neurobiol 133: 679-717
MeSH Terms: Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders, Humans, Parkinson Disease
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as compulsive gambling, buying, sexual, and eating behaviors, are a serious and increasingly recognized complication in Parkinson's disease (PD), occurring in up to 20% of PD patients over the course of their illness. Related behaviors include punding (stereotyped, repetitive, purposeless behaviors), dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) (compulsive medication overuse), and hobbyism (e.g., compulsive internet use, artistic endeavors, and writing). These disorders have a significant impact on quality of life and function, strain interpersonal relationships, and worsen caregiver burden, and are associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity. ICDs have been most closely related to the use of dopamine agonists (DAs), while DDS is primarily associated with shorter acting, higher potency dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), such as levodopa. However, in preliminary research ICDs have also been reported to occur with monoamine oxidase inhibitor-B and amantadine treatment, and after deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Other risk factors for ICDs may include sex (e.g., male sex for compulsive sexual behavior, and female sex for compulsive buying behavior); younger age overall at PD onset; a pre-PD history of an ICD; personal or family history of substance abuse, bipolar disorder, or gambling problems; and impulsive personality traits. Dysregulation of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system is thought to be the major neurobiological substrate for ICDs in PD, but there is preliminary evidence for alterations in opiate and serotonin systems too. The primary treatment of ICDs in PD is discontinuation of the offending treatment, but not all patients can tolerate this due to worsening motor symptoms or DA withdrawal syndrome. While psychiatric medications and psychosocial treatments are frequently used to treat ICDs in the general population, there is limited empirical evidence for their use in PD, so it is critical for patients to be monitored closely for ICDs from disease onset and routine throughout its course. In the future, it may be possible to use a precision medicine approach to decrease the incidence of ICDs in PD by avoiding DA use in patients determined to be at highest risk based on their clinical and neurobiological (e.g., motor presentation, behavioral measures of medication response, genetics, dopamine transporter neuroimaging) profile. Additionally, as empirically validated treatments for ICDs and similar disorders (e.g., substance use disorders) emerge, it will also be important to examine their efficacy and tolerability in individuals with comorbid PD.
© 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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3 MeSH Terms
Decreased Rhes mRNA levels in the brain of patients with Parkinson's disease and MPTP-treated macaques.
Napolitano F, Booth Warren E, Migliarini S, Punzo D, Errico F, Li Q, Thiolat ML, Vescovi AL, Calabresi P, Bezard E, Morelli M, Konradi C, Pasqualetti M, Usiello A
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0181677
MeSH Terms: 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Animals, Bipolar Disorder, Brain Chemistry, Case-Control Studies, Female, GTP-Binding Proteins, Humans, Macaca mulatta, Male, Middle Aged, Parkinson Disease, Putamen, RNA, Messenger, Schizophrenia
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
In rodent and human brains, the small GTP-binding protein Rhes is highly expressed in virtually all dopaminoceptive striatal GABAergic medium spiny neurons, as well as in large aspiny cholinergic interneurons, where it is thought to modulate dopamine-dependent signaling. Consistent with this knowledge, and considering that dopaminergic neurotransmission is altered in neurological and psychiatric disorders, here we sought to investigate whether Rhes mRNA expression is altered in brain regions of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), Schizophrenia (SCZ), and Bipolar Disorder (BD), when compared to healthy controls (about 200 post-mortem samples). Moreover, we performed the same analysis in the putamen of non-human primate Macaca Mulatta, lesioned with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Overall, our data indicated comparable Rhes mRNA levels in the brain of patients with SCZ and BD, and their respective healthy controls. In sharp contrast, the putamen of patients suffering from PD showed a significant 35% reduction of this transcript, compared to healthy subjects. Interestingly, in line with observations obtained in humans, we found 27% decrease in Rhes mRNA levels in the putamen of MPTP-treated primates. Based on the established inhibitory influence of Rhes on dopamine-related responses, we hypothesize that its striatal downregulation in PD patients and animal models of PD might represent an adaptive event of the dopaminergic system to functionally counteract the reduced nigrostriatal innervation.
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1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Mesocorticolimbic hemodynamic response in Parkinson's disease patients with compulsive behaviors.
Claassen DO, Stark AJ, Spears CA, Petersen KJ, van Wouwe NC, Kessler RM, Zald DH, Donahue MJ
(2017) Mov Disord 32: 1574-1583
MeSH Terms: Aged, Animals, Cerebral Cortex, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Dopamine Agonists, Female, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Parkinson Disease, Periaqueductal Gray, Severity of Illness Index, Spin Labels, Ventral Striatum
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
BACKGROUND - PD patients treated with dopamine therapy can develop maladaptive impulsive and compulsive behaviors, manifesting as repetitive participation in reward-driven activities. This behavioral phenotype implicates aberrant mesocorticolimbic network function, a concept supported by past literature. However, no study has investigated the acute hemodynamic response to dopamine agonists in this subpopulation.
OBJECTIVES - We tested the hypothesis that dopamine agonists differentially alter mesocortical and mesolimbic network activity in patients with impulsive-compulsive behaviors.
METHODS - Dopamine agonist effects on neuronal metabolism were quantified using arterial-spin-labeling MRI measures of cerebral blood flow in the on-dopamine agonist and off-dopamine states. The within-subject design included 34 PD patients, 17 with active impulsive compulsive behavior symptoms, matched for age, sex, disease duration, and PD severity.
RESULTS - Patients with impulsive-compulsive behaviors have a significant increase in ventral striatal cerebral blood flow in response to dopamine agonists. Across all patients, ventral striatal cerebral blood flow on-dopamine agonist is significantly correlated with impulsive-compulsive behavior severity (Questionnaire for Impulsive Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease- Rating Scale). Voxel-wise analysis of dopamine agonist-induced cerebral blood flow revealed group differences in mesocortical (ventromedial prefrontal cortex; insular cortex), mesolimbic (ventral striatum), and midbrain (SN; periaqueductal gray) regions.
CONCLUSIONS - These results indicate that dopamine agonist therapy can augment mesocorticolimbic and striato-nigro-striatal network activity in patients susceptible to impulsive-compulsive behaviors. Our findings reinforce a wider literature linking studies of maladaptive behaviors to mesocorticolimbic networks and extend our understanding of biological mechanisms of impulsive compulsive behaviors in PD. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
© 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
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2 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Impulse Control Disorders and Related Complications of Parkinson's Disease Therapy.
Lopez AM, Weintraub D, Claassen DO
(2017) Semin Neurol 37: 186-192
MeSH Terms: Disruptive, Impulse Control, and Conduct Disorders, Dopamine, Dopamine Agonists, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Parkinson Disease
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Impulsive and compulsive behaviors in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are most often attributed to dopamine agonist therapy; dysregulation of the mesocorticolimbic system accounts for this behavioral phenotype. The clinical presentation is commonly termed (ICD): Behaviors include hypersexuality, compulsive eating, shopping, pathological gambling, and compulsive hobby participation. However, not all PD individuals taking dopamine agonists develop these behavioral changes. In this review, the authors focus on the similarities between the phenotypic presentation of ICDs with that of other reward-based behavioral disorders, including binge eating disorder, pathological gambling, and substance use disorders. With this comparison, we emphasize that the transition from an impulsive to compulsive behavior likely follows a ventral to dorsal striatal pattern, where an altered dopaminergic reward system underlies the emergence of these problematic behaviors. The authors discuss the neurobiological similarities between these latter disorders and ICDs, emphasizing similar pathophysiological processes and discussing treatment options that have potential for translation to PD patients.
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
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1 Members
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6 MeSH Terms
Connecting imaging mass spectrometry and magnetic resonance imaging-based anatomical atlases for automated anatomical interpretation and differential analysis.
Verbeeck N, Spraggins JM, Murphy MJM, Wang HD, Deutch AY, Caprioli RM, Van de Plas R
(2017) Biochim Biophys Acta Proteins Proteom 1865: 967-977
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Ions, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mass Spectrometry, Mice, Parkinson Disease, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular imaging technology that can measure thousands of biomolecules concurrently without prior tagging, making it particularly suitable for exploratory research. However, the data size and dimensionality often makes thorough extraction of relevant information impractical. To help guide and accelerate IMS data analysis, we recently developed a framework that integrates IMS measurements with anatomical atlases, opening up opportunities for anatomy-driven exploration of IMS data. One example is the automated anatomical interpretation of ion images, where empirically measured ion distributions are automatically decomposed into their underlying anatomical structures. While offering significant potential, IMS-atlas integration has thus far been restricted to the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas (AMBA) and mouse brain samples. Here, we expand the applicability of this framework by extending towards new animal species and a new set of anatomical atlases retrieved from the Scalable Brain Atlas (SBA). Furthermore, as many SBA atlases are based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, a new registration pipeline was developed that enables direct non-rigid IMS-to-MRI registration. These developments are demonstrated on protein-focused FTICR IMS measurements from coronal brain sections of a Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model. The measurements are integrated with an MRI-based rat brain atlas from the SBA. The new rat-focused IMS-atlas integration is used to perform automated anatomical interpretation and to find differential ions between healthy and diseased tissue. IMS-atlas integration can serve as an important accelerator in IMS data exploration, and with these new developments it can now be applied to a wider variety of animal species and modalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MALDI Imaging, edited by Dr. Corinna Henkel and Prof. Peter Hoffmann.
Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.
1 Communities
3 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Focused stimulation of dorsal subthalamic nucleus improves reactive inhibitory control of action impulses.
van Wouwe NC, Pallavaram S, Phibbs FT, Martinez-Ramirez D, Neimat JS, Dawant BM, D'Haese PF, Kanoff KE, van den Wildenberg WPM, Okun MS, Wylie SA
(2017) Neuropsychologia 99: 37-47
MeSH Terms: Antiparkinson Agents, Deep Brain Stimulation, Dopamine Agents, Female, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Inhibition (Psychology), Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Neuropsychological Tests, Parkinson Disease, Reaction Time, Subthalamic Nucleus
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Frontal-basal ganglia circuitry dysfunction caused by Parkinson's disease impairs important executive cognitive processes, such as the ability to inhibit impulsive action tendencies. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's disease improves the reactive inhibition of impulsive actions that interfere with goal-directed behavior. An unresolved question is whether this effect depends on stimulation of a particular Subthalamic Nucleus subregion. The current study aimed to 1) replicate previous findings and additionally investigate the effect of chronic versus acute Subthalamic Nucleus stimulation on inhibitory control in Parkinson's disease patients off dopaminergic medication 2) test whether stimulating Subthalamic Nucleus subregions differentially modulate proactive response control and the proficiency of reactive inhibitory control. In the first experiment, twelve Parkinson's disease patients completed three sessions of the Simon task, Off Deep brain stimulation and medication, on acute Deep Brain Stimulation and on chronic Deep Brain Stimulation. Experiment 2 consisted of 11 Parkinson's disease patients with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation (off medication) who completed two testing sessions involving of a Simon task either with stimulation of the dorsal or the ventral contact in the Subthalamic Nucleus. Our findings show that Deep Brain Stimulation improves reactive inhibitory control, regardless of medication and regardless of whether it concerns chronic or acute Subthalamic Nucleus stimulation. More importantly, selective stimulation of dorsal and ventral subregions of the Subthalamic Nucleus indicates that especially the dorsal Subthalamic Nucleus circuitries are crucial for modulating the reactive inhibitory control of motor actions.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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