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A signalling cascade of IL-33 to IL-13 regulates metaplasia in the mouse stomach.
Petersen CP, Meyer AR, De Salvo C, Choi E, Schlegel C, Petersen A, Engevik AC, Prasad N, Levy SE, Peebles RS, Pizarro TT, Goldenring JR
(2018) Gut 67: 805-817
MeSH Terms: Animals, Flow Cytometry, Gastric Mucosa, Immunohistochemistry, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Interleukin-1 Receptor-Like 1 Protein, Interleukin-13, Interleukin-33, Macrophages, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Interleukin, Signal Transduction, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) are associated with the progression of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in the stomach. However, the precise mechanism(s) and critical mediators that induce SPEM are unknown.
DESIGN - To determine candidate genes important in these processes, macrophages from the stomach corpus of mice with SPEM (DMP-777-treated) or advanced SPEM (L635-treated) were isolated and RNA sequenced. Effects on metaplasia development after acute parietal cell loss induced by L635 were evaluated in interleukin (IL)-33, IL-33 receptor (ST2) and IL-13 knockout (KO) mice.
RESULTS - Profiling of metaplasia-associated macrophages in the stomach identified an M2a-polarised macrophage population. Expression of IL-33 was significantly upregulated in macrophages associated with advanced SPEM. L635 induced metaplasia in the stomachs of wild-type mice, but not in the stomachs of IL-33 and ST2 KO mice. While IL-5 and IL-9 were not required for metaplasia induction, IL-13 KO mice did not develop metaplasia in response to L635. Administration of IL-13 to ST2 KO mice re-established the induction of metaplasia following acute parietal cell loss.
CONCLUSIONS - Metaplasia induction and macrophage polarisation after parietal cell loss is coordinated through a cytokine signalling network of IL-33 and IL-13, linking a combined response to injury by both intrinsic mucosal mechanisms and infiltrating M2 macrophages.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.
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19 MeSH Terms
Targeted Apoptosis of Parietal Cells Is Insufficient to Induce Metaplasia in Stomach.
Burclaff J, Osaki LH, Liu D, Goldenring JR, Mills JC
(2017) Gastroenterology 152: 762-766.e7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Atrophy, Azetidines, Cell Proliferation, Cellular Reprogramming, Chief Cells, Gastric, Diphtheria Toxin, Heparin-binding EGF-like Growth Factor, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Intrinsic Factor, Metaplasia, Mice, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Piperazines, Plant Lectins, Stomach, Tamoxifen
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Parietal cell atrophy is considered to cause metaplasia in the stomach. We developed mice that express the diphtheria toxin receptor specifically in parietal cells to induce their death, and found this to increase proliferation in the normal stem cell zone and neck but not to cause metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells. Furthermore, the metaplasia-inducing agents tamoxifen or DMP-777 still induced metaplasia even after previous destruction of parietal cells by diphtheria toxin. Atrophy of parietal cells alone therefore is not sufficient to induce metaplasia: completion of metaplastic reprogramming of chief cells requires mechanisms beyond parietal cell injury or death.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
Maturity and age influence chief cell ability to transdifferentiate into metaplasia.
Weis VG, Petersen CP, Weis JA, Meyer AR, Choi E, Mills JC, Goldenring JR
(2017) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 312: G67-G76
MeSH Terms: Age Factors, Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Lineage, Cell Proliferation, Cell Transdifferentiation, Chief Cells, Gastric, Gastric Mucosa, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The plasticity of gastric chief cells is exemplified by their ability to transdifferentiate into spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) after parietal cell loss. We sought to determine if chief cell maturity is a limiting factor in the capacity to transdifferentiate. Mist1 mice, previously shown to form only immature chief cells, were treated with DMP-777 or L635 to study the capability of these immature chief cells to transdifferentiate into a proliferative metaplastic lineage after acute parietal cell loss. Mist1 mice treated with DMP-777 showed fewer chief cell to SPEM transitions. Mist1 mice treated with L635 demonstrated significantly fewer proliferative SPEM cells compared with control mice. Thus immature chief cells were unable to transdifferentiate efficiently into SPEM after acute parietal cell loss. To determine whether chief cell age affects transdifferentiation into SPEM, we used tamoxifen to induce YFP expression in chief cells of Mist1;Rosa mice and subsequently treated the cells with L635 to induce SPEM at 1 to 3.5 mo after tamoxifen treatment. After L635 treatment to induce acute parietal cell loss, 43% of all YFP-positive cells at 1 mo posttamoxifen were SPEM cells, of which 44% of these YFP-positive SPEM cells were proliferative. By 2 mo after tamoxifen induction, only 24% of marked SPEM cells were proliferating. However, by 3.5 mo after tamoxifen induction, only 12% of marked chief cells transdifferentiated into SPEM and none were proliferative. Thus, as chief cells age, they lose their ability to transdifferentiate into SPEM and proliferate. Therefore, both functional maturation and age limit chief cell plasticity.
NEW & NOTEWORTHY - Previous investigations have indicated that spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in the stomach arises from transdifferentiation of chief cells. Nevertheless, the intrinsic properties of chief cells that influence transdifferentiation have been largely unknown. We now report that the ability to transdifferentiate into SPEM is impaired in chief cells that lack full functional maturation, and as chief cells age, they lose their ability to transdifferentiate. Thus chief cell plasticity is dependent on both cell age and maturation.
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15 MeSH Terms
Unique Cellular Lineage Composition of the First Gland of the Mouse Gastric Corpus.
O'Neil A, Petersen CP, Choi E, Engevik AC, Goldenring JR
(2017) J Histochem Cytochem 65: 47-58
MeSH Terms: Animals, Clusterin, Gastric Mucosa, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mucin-4, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Plant Lectins, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, SOXB1 Transcription Factors, Stem Cells, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The glandular stomach has two major zones: the acid secreting corpus and the gastrin cell-containing antrum. Nevertheless, a single gland lies at the transition between the forestomach and corpus in the mouse stomach. We have sought to define the lineages that make up this gland unit at the squamocolumnar junction. The first gland in mice showed a notable absence of characteristic corpus lineages, including parietal cells and chief cells. In contrast, the gland showed strong staining of Griffonia simplicifolia-II (GSII)-lectin-positive mucous cells at the bases of glands, which were also positive for CD44 variant 9 and Clusterin. Prominent numbers of doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) positive tuft cells were present in the first gland. The first gland contained Lgr5-expressing putative progenitor cells, and a large proportion of the cells were positive for Sox2. The cells of the first gland stained strongly for MUC4 and EpCAM, but both were absent in the normal corpus mucosa. The present studies indicate that the first gland in the corpus represents a unique anatomic entity. The presence of a concentration of progenitor cells and sensory tuft cells in this gland suggests that it may represent a source of reserve reparative cells for adapting to severe mucosal damage.
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14 MeSH Terms
Dynamic expansion of gastric mucosal doublecortin-like kinase 1-expressing cells in response to parietal cell loss is regulated by gastrin.
Choi E, Petersen CP, Lapierre LA, Williams JA, Weis VG, Goldenring JR, Nam KT
(2015) Am J Pathol 185: 2219-31
MeSH Terms: Animals, Atrophy, Gastric Mucosa, Gastrins, Metaplasia, Mice, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1) is considered a reliable marker for tuft cells in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigated the dynamic changes of tuft cells associated with mouse models of oxyntic atrophy and metaplasia in the stomach. Increases in the numbers of Dclk1-positive tuft cells were observed in several models of parietal cell loss. However, the expanded population of Dclk1-expressing cells showed a morphologically distinct structure in apical microvilli and acetylated microtubules, which was not seen in the tuft cells present in the normal gastric mucosa. These microvillar sensory cells (MVSCs) showed no evidence of proliferation. The expansion of the MVSCs induced by oxyntic atrophy was reversible after the return of parietal cells. More important, expansion of MVSCs after induced parietal cell loss was not observed in Gast(-/-) mice. Although the Dclk1-expressing cells in the normal gastric mucosa were in part derived from Lrig1-expressing stem cells, the Lrig1-lineaged cells did not produce the expanded Dclk1-expressing cells associated with oxyntic atrophy. These studies indicate that loss of parietal cells leads to the reversible emergence of a novel Dclk1-expressing sensory cell population in the gastric mucosa.
Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Ink4a/Arf-Dependent Loss of Parietal Cells Induced by Oxidative Stress Promotes CD44-Dependent Gastric Tumorigenesis.
Seishima R, Wada T, Tsuchihashi K, Okazaki S, Yoshikawa M, Oshima H, Oshima M, Sato T, Hasegawa H, Kitagawa Y, Goldenring JR, Saya H, Nagano O
(2015) Cancer Prev Res (Phila) 8: 492-501
MeSH Terms: ADP-Ribosylation Factor 1, Animals, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Cells, Cultured, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16, Hyaluronan Receptors, Immunoenzyme Techniques, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neoplastic Stem Cells, Oxidative Stress, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Signal Transduction, Stomach Neoplasms, Wnt1 Protein, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2016
Loss of parietal cells initiates the development of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), a precancerous lesion in stomach. CD44 variant (CD44v) that enhances the ability to defend against reactive oxygen species (ROS) in epithelial cells is expressed de novo in SPEM of K19-Wnt1/C2mE mice, a transgenic model of gastric tumorigenesis, and is required for the efficient development of SPEM and gastric tumor in these animals. The role of ROS and its downstream signaling in CD44-dependent gastric tumorigenesis has remained unknown, however. With the use of the K19-Wnt1/C2mE mouse, we now show that parietal cells in the inflamed stomach are highly sensitive to oxidative stress and manifest activation of p38(MAPK) signaling by ROS. Oral treatment with the antioxidant ascorbic acid or genetic ablation of the Ink4a/Arf locus, a major downstream target of ROS-p38(MAPK) signaling, inhibited parietal cell loss and the subsequent gastric tumorigenesis. Our results indicate that signaling activated by oxidative stress in parietal cells plays a key role in CD44-dependent gastric tumorigenesis. .
©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.
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17 MeSH Terms
Macrophages promote progression of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia after acute loss of parietal cells.
Petersen CP, Weis VG, Nam KT, Sousa JF, Fingleton B, Goldenring JR
(2014) Gastroenterology 146: 1727-38.e8
MeSH Terms: Adaptive Immunity, Animals, Atrophy, Calcium-Binding Proteins, Cell Proliferation, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Gastritis, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Glutathione Peroxidase, Homeodomain Proteins, Immunity, Innate, Inflammation Mediators, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Interferon-gamma, Macrophages, Male, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mucins, Neutrophils, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptides, Phenotype, RNA, Messenger, Stomach Neoplasms, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Loss of parietal cells causes the development of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) through transdifferentiation of chief cells. In the presence of inflammation, SPEM can advance into a more proliferative metaplasia with increased expression of intestine-specific transcripts. We used L635 to induce acute SPEM with inflammation in mice and investigated the roles of inflammatory cells in the development of SPEM.
METHODS - To study the adaptive immune system, Rag1 knockout, interferon-γ-deficient, and wild-type (control) mice received L635 for 3 days. To study the innate immune system, macrophages were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of clodronate liposomes 2 days before and throughout L635 administration. Neutrophils were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of an antibody against Ly6G 2 days before and throughout L635 administration. Pathology and immunohistochemical analyses were used to determine depletion efficiency, metaplasia, and proliferation. To characterize SPEM in each model, gastric tissues were collected and levels of Cftr, Dmbt1, and Gpx2 mRNAs were measured. Markers of macrophage polarization were used to identify subpopulations of macrophages recruited to the gastric mucosa.
RESULTS - Administration of L635 to Rag1 knockout, interferon-γ-deficient, and neutrophil-depleted mice led to development of proliferative SPEM and up-regulation of intestine-specific transcripts in SPEM cells, similar to controls. However, macrophage-depleted mice given L635 showed significant reductions in numbers of SPEM cells, SPEM cell proliferation, and expression of intestine-specific transcripts, compared with control mice given L635. In mice given L635, as well as patients with intestinal metaplasia, M2 macrophages were the primary inflammatory component.
CONCLUSIONS - Results from studies of mouse models and human metaplastic tissues indicate that M2 macrophages promote the advancement of SPEM in the presence of inflammation.
Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
2 Members
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32 MeSH Terms
Helicobacter pylori-induced posttranscriptional regulation of H-K-ATPase α-subunit gene expression by miRNA.
Zhang YM, Noto JM, Hammond CE, Barth JL, Argraves WS, Backert S, Peek RM, Smolka AJ
(2014) Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 306: G606-13
MeSH Terms: 3' Untranslated Regions, Achlorhydria, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Gastric Mucosa, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Genes, Reporter, H(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, MicroRNAs, NF-kappa B p50 Subunit, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Peptidoglycan, RNA Interference, RNA Processing, Post-Transcriptional, RNA, Messenger, Time Factors, Transfection, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
Acute Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric epithelial cells induces CagA oncoprotein- and peptidoglycan (SLT)-dependent mobilization of NF-κB p50 homodimers that bind to H-K-ATPase α-subunit (HKα) promoter and repress HKα gene transcription. This process may facilitate gastric H. pylori colonization by induction of transient hypochlorhydria. We hypothesized that H. pylori also regulates HKα expression posttranscriptionally by miRNA interaction with HKα mRNA. In silico analysis of the HKα 3' untranslated region (UTR) identified miR-1289 as a highly conserved putative HKα-regulatory miRNA. H. pylori infection of AGS cells transfected with HKα 3' UTR-Luc reporter construct repressed luciferase activity by 70%, whereas ΔcagA or Δslt H. pylori infections partially abrogated repression. Transfection of AGS cells expressing HKα 3' UTR-Luc construct with an oligoribonucleotide mimetic of miR-1289 induced maximal repression (54%) of UTR activity within 30 min; UTR activity was unchanged by nontargeting siRNA transfection. Gastric biopsies from patients infected with cagA(+) H. pylori showed a significant increase in miR-1289 expression compared with uninfected patients or those infected with cagA(-) H. pylori. Finally, miR-1289 expression was necessary and sufficient to attenuate biopsy HKα protein expression in the absence of infection. Taken together, these data indicate that miR-1289 is upregulated by H. pylori in a CagA- and SLT-dependent manner and targets HKα 3' UTR, affecting HKα mRNA translation. The sensitivity of HKα mRNA 3' UTR to binding of miR-1289 identifies a novel regulatory mechanism of gastric acid secretion and offers new insights into mechanisms underlying transient H. pylori-induced hypochlorhydria.
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24 MeSH Terms
Cell lineage distribution atlas of the human stomach reveals heterogeneous gland populations in the gastric antrum.
Choi E, Roland JT, Barlow BJ, O'Neal R, Rich AE, Nam KT, Shi C, Goldenring JR
(2014) Gut 63: 1711-20
MeSH Terms: Cell Lineage, Enteroendocrine Cells, Gastric Mucosa, Gastrins, Ghrelin, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Parietal Cells, Gastric, Pyloric Antrum, Somatostatin, Stomach
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
OBJECTIVE - The glands of the stomach body and antral mucosa contain a complex compendium of cell lineages. In lower mammals, the distribution of oxyntic glands and antral glands define the anatomical regions within the stomach. We examined in detail the distribution of the full range of cell lineages within the human stomach.
DESIGN - We determined the distribution of gastric gland cell lineages with specific immunocytochemical markers in entire stomach specimens from three non-obese organ donors.
RESULTS - The anatomical body and antrum of the human stomach were defined by the presence of ghrelin and gastrin cells, respectively. Concentrations of somatostatin cells were observed in the proximal stomach. Parietal cells were seen in all glands of the body of the stomach as well as in over 50% of antral glands. MIST1 expressing chief cells were predominantly observed in the body although individual glands of the antrum also showed MIST1 expressing chief cells. While classically described antral glands were observed with gastrin cells and deep antral mucous cells without any parietal cells, we also observed a substantial population of mixed type glands containing both parietal cells and G cells throughout the antrum.
CONCLUSIONS - Enteroendocrine cells show distinct patterns of localisation in the human stomach. The existence of antral glands with mixed cell lineages indicates that human antral glands may be functionally chimeric with glands assembled from multiple distinct stem cell populations.
Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
1 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
The hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 coordinates normal and metaplastic gastric epithelial progenitor cell proliferation.
Khurana SS, Riehl TE, Moore BD, Fassan M, Rugge M, Romero-Gallo J, Noto J, Peek RM, Stenson WF, Mills JC
(2013) J Biol Chem 288: 16085-97
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Proliferation, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Hyaluronan Receptors, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Male, Metaplasia, Mice, Parietal Cells, Gastric, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
The stem cell in the isthmus of gastric units continually replenishes the epithelium. Atrophy of acid-secreting parietal cells (PCs) frequently occurs during infection with Helicobacter pylori, predisposing patients to cancer. Atrophy causes increased proliferation of stem cells, yet little is known about how this process is regulated. Here we show that CD44 labels a population of small, undifferentiated cells in the gastric unit isthmus where stem cells are known to reside. Loss of CD44 in vivo results in decreased proliferation of the gastric epithelium. When we induce PC atrophy by Helicobacter infection or tamoxifen treatment, this CD44(+) population expands from the isthmus toward the base of the unit. CD44 blockade during PC atrophy abrogates the expansion. We find that CD44 binds STAT3, and inhibition of either CD44 or STAT3 signaling causes decreased proliferation. Atrophy-induced CD44 expansion depends on pERK, which labels isthmal cells in mice and humans. Our studies delineate an in vivo signaling pathway, ERK → CD44 → STAT3, that regulates normal and atrophy-induced gastric stem/progenitor-cell proliferation. We further show that we can intervene pharmacologically at each signaling step in vivo to modulate proliferation.
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14 MeSH Terms