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Future Directions in the Study and Treatment of Parent-Child Separation.
Humphreys KL
(2019) J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol 48: 166-178
MeSH Terms: Adult, Caregivers, Child, Child Abuse, Child Development, Family, Family Separation, Female, Forecasting, Humans, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Parents, Treatment Outcome, Undocumented Immigrants
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Children require adult caregivers to survive and thrive. In the absence of committed and nurturing care, children face increased risk for a number of difficulties, including internalizing and externalizing psychopathology, cognitive and language deficits, and social difficulties. Recent changes in the U.S. immigration system have resulted in a large number of children removed from their parents, drawing increased scrutiny to the impact of parent-child separation and best practices for caring for children who have been separated. Drawing from work on children exposed to institutional care, as well as research on children separated from caregivers due to validated abuse and neglect, it is clear that children belong in families that are safe and supportive and that some forms of substitute care (i.e., institutional or group-based care) are insufficient to meet children's needs. However, it is difficult to know the specific impact of parent-child separation on child outcomes given that stressors often cluster and pre-separation experiences and post-separation placements also contribute to the experience of separation from a parent and subsequent functioning. Attempts to parse the specific contributions of each separation-related stressor, examining sensitive periods in the impact of separation, studying the mechanisms by which separations affect children, and consideration of the broader social and political context are useful future directions for moving this area of study forward. We must also more fully probe the roles that caregivers play in child development. Lastly, we must endeavor to cease practices of removing children from loving and capable caregivers and, when necessary, provide support to parents and children who have experienced separation.
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A new measure of child vocal reciprocity in children with autism spectrum disorder.
Harbison AL, Woynaroski TG, Tapp J, Wade JW, Warlaumont AS, Yoder PJ
(2018) Autism Res 11: 903-915
MeSH Terms: Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Child Language, Child, Preschool, Communication, Female, Humans, Language Development Disorders, Male, Parents, Reproducibility of Results, Speech
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Children's vocal development occurs in the context of reciprocal exchanges with a communication partner who models "speechlike" productions. We propose a new measure of child vocal reciprocity, which we define as the degree to which an adult vocal response increases the probability of an immediately following child vocal response. Vocal reciprocity is likely to be associated with the speechlikeness of vocal communication in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Two studies were conducted to test the utility of the new measure. The first used simulated vocal samples with randomly sequenced child and adult vocalizations to test the accuracy of the proposed index of child vocal reciprocity. The second was an empirical study of 21 children with ASD who were preverbal or in the early stages of language development. Daylong vocal samples collected in the natural environment were computer analyzed to derive the proposed index of child vocal reciprocity, which was highly stable when derived from two daylong vocal samples and was associated with speechlikeness of vocal communication. This association was significant even when controlling for chance probability of child vocalizations to adult vocal responses, probability of adult vocalizations, or probability of child vocalizations. A valid measure of children's vocal reciprocity might eventually improve our ability to predict which children are on track to develop useful speech and/or are most likely to respond to language intervention. A link to a free, publicly-available software program to derive the new measure of child vocal reciprocity is provided. Autism Res 2018, 11: 903-915. © 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
LAY SUMMARY - Children and adults often engage in back-and-forth vocal exchanges. The extent to which they do so is believed to support children's early speech and language development. Two studies tested a new measure of child vocal reciprocity using computer-generated and real-life vocal samples of young children with autism collected in natural settings. The results provide initial evidence of accuracy, test-retest reliability, and validity of the new measure of child vocal reciprocity. A sound measure of children's vocal reciprocity might improve our ability to predict which children are on track to develop useful speech and/or are most likely to respond to language intervention. A free, publicly-available software program and manuals are provided.
© 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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Time-varying effects of income on hippocampal volume trajectories in adolescent girls.
Ellwood-Lowe ME, Humphreys KL, Ordaz SJ, Camacho MC, Sacchet MD, Gotlib IH
(2018) Dev Cogn Neurosci 30: 41-50
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adolescent Development, Adult, Child, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Hippocampus, Humans, Income, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Mother-Child Relations, Organ Size, Parents, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Children from lower-SES families exhibit smaller hippocampal volume than do their higher-SES peers. Few studies, however, have compared hippocampal developmental trajectories as a function of SES. Thus, it is unclear whether initial rank-order stability is preserved, or whether volumes diverge/converge over the course of adolescence. In a sample of 101 girls ages 10-24 years, we examined the longitudinal association between family income and parental education, proxies for SES, and changes in hippocampal volume. Hippocampal volume was obtained using MRI; using mixed modeling, we examined the effects of income and education on hippocampal volume across age. As expected, changes in volume were non-linear across development. Further, trajectories diverged in mid-adolescence, with lower-income girls exhibiting reductions in hippocampal volume. Maximal income-related differences were observed at 18 years, and trajectories converged thereafter. This interaction remained significant when accounting for maternal hippocampal volume, suggesting a unique contribution of environment over potential heritable differences. In contrast, the association between parental education and offspring hippocampal volume appeared to be stable across adolescence, with higher levels of parental education predicting consistently larger hippocampal volume. These findings constitute preliminary evidence that girls from lower-income homes exhibit unique trajectories of hippocampal growth, with differences most evident in late adolescence.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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Development of an eHealth Program for Parents of Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.
Whittemore R, Zincavage RM, Jaser SS, Grey M, Coleman JL, Collett D, Delvy R, Basile Ibrahim B, Marceau LD
(2018) Diabetes Educ 44: 72-82
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Attitude of Health Personnel, Child, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Health Personnel, Humans, Male, Parent-Child Relations, Parents, Program Evaluation, Qualitative Research, Self Care, Surveys and Questionnaires, Telemedicine, Transition to Adult Care
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2018
Purpose The purpose of this study was to understand the experience of parenting an adolescent with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), to develop a prototype of an eHealth program for parents of adolescents with T1DM, and to evaluate the prototype content and acceptability from the perspective of parents and health care providers. Methods A multiphase method was used generating both qualitative and quantitative data at multiple time points. There were 27 parents of adolescents aged 12 to 18 years with T1DM and 16 health care providers who participated in semistructured interviews to identify parental challenges; 53 parents and 27 providers evaluated the prototype. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze interview transcripts, and descriptive statistics were used to summarize survey data. Results Challenges experienced by parents of adolescents with T1DM included understanding the developmental and hormonal changes of adolescence that affect diabetes care, feeling tension between adolescent independence and parent control, communicating without nagging or conflict, transferring diabetes care responsibility safely, dealing with feelings of stress and distress, and perceiving a lack of resources for T1DM care and insufficient personal time for self-care. In the prototype evaluation, both parents and providers found content to be relevant and provided feedback to guide the development of the full program. Conclusions Parents of adolescents with T1DM and providers expressed a need for parents to have more support in transitioning diabetes care from parent to adolescent. eHealth programs offer an ideal way to address these needs and ultimately can be linked to electronic medical records improving quality and efficiency of health care in this population.
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16 MeSH Terms
Sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and their parents in the T1D Exchange.
Jaser SS, Foster NC, Nelson BA, Kittelsrud JM, DiMeglio LA, Quinn M, Willi SM, Simmons JH, T1D Exchange Clinic Network
(2017) Sleep Med 39: 108-115
MeSH Terms: Blood Glucose, Child, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Hypoglycemia, Male, Parents, Registries, Sleep, Sleep Wake Disorders, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2018
OBJECTIVES - Sleep has physiological and behavioral impacts on diabetes outcomes, yet little is known about the impact of sleep disturbances in children with type 1 diabetes. The current study sought to characterize sleep in children with type 1 diabetes and in their parents and to examine the associations between child sleep, glycemic control and adherence, parent sleep and well-being, parental fear of hypoglycemia, and nocturnal caregiving behavior.
METHODS - Surveys were emailed to parents of 2- to 12-year-old participants in the Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) Exchange clinic registry. Clinical data were obtained from the registry for the 515 respondents.
RESULTS - In our sample, 67% of children met criteria for poor sleep quality. Child sleep quality was related to glycemic control (HbA1c of 7.9% [63 mmol/mol] in children with poor sleep quality vs 7.6% [60 mmol/mol] in children with non-poor sleep quality; P < 0.001) but not mean frequency of blood glucose monitoring (BGM) (7.6 times/day vs 7.4 in poor/non-poor quality; P = 0.56). Associations were similar for sleep duration. Children with poor sleep quality were more likely to experience severe hypoglycemia (4% in children with poor sleep quality vs 1% in children with non-poor sleep quality; P = 0.05) and more likely to experience DKA (7% vs 4%, respectively; P < 0.001). Poorer child sleep quality was associated with poorer parental sleep quality, parental well-being, and fear of hypoglycemia (P < 0.001 for all). Child sleep was not related to the use of diabetes-related technology (CGM, insulin pump).
CONCLUSIONS - Sleep may be a modifiable factor to improve glycemic control and reduce parental distress.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Adolescent Participation in HPV Vaccine Clinical Trials: Are Parents Willing?
Erves JC, Mayo-Gamble TL, Hull PC, Duke L, Miller ST
(2017) J Community Health 42: 894-901
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Clinical Trials as Topic, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Papillomavirus Vaccines, Parents, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Vaccination
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2017
Approximately one-quarter of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are acquired by adolescents, with a higher burden among racial/ethnic minorities. However, racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in previous HPV vaccine trials. Ongoing and future HPV vaccine optimization trials would benefit from racially- and ethnically-diverse sample of adolescent trial participants. This study examined factors influencing parental willingness to consent to their adolescents' participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials and tested for possible racial differences. A convenience sample of parents of adolescents (N = 256) completed a cross-sectional survey. Chi square analyses were used to assess racial differences in parental HPV vaccine awareness and intentions and willingness to consent to their child participating in an HPV vaccine clinical trial. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with willingness. Approximately 47% of parents were willing to allow their adolescent to participate in HPV vaccine clinical trials (30.7% African American and 48.3% Caucasian, p = .081). African Americans had lower HPV vaccine awareness (p = .006) but not lower intentions to vaccinate (p = .086). Parental willingness was positively associated with the following variables: Child's age (p < .039), Perceived Advantages of HPV Vaccination for Adolescents (p = .002), Parental Trust in Medical Researchers (p < .001), and Level of Ease in Understanding Clinical Trial Information (p = .010). Educating parents about the advantages of HPV vaccines for younger adolescents using low-literacy educational materials and building trust between parents and researchers may increase parental willingness to consent to adolescent participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials.
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8 MeSH Terms
A Path Model of Expressive Vocabulary Skills in Initially Preverbal Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
McDaniel J, Yoder P, Watson LR
(2017) J Autism Dev Disord 47: 947-960
MeSH Terms: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Child Language, Child, Preschool, Communication, Female, Humans, Linguistics, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Parents, Vocabulary
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
We examined direct and indirect paths involving receptive vocabulary and diversity of key consonants used in communication (DKCC) to improve understanding of why previously identified value-added predictors are associated with later expressive vocabulary for initially preverbal children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; n = 87). Intentional communication, DKCC, and parent linguistic responses accounted for unique variance in later expressive vocabulary when controlling for mid-point receptive vocabulary, but responding to joint attention did not. We did not confirm any indirect paths through mid-point receptive vocabulary. DKCC mediated the association between intentional communication and expressive vocabulary. Further research is needed to replicate the findings, test potentially causal relations, and provide a specific sequence of intervention targets for preverbal children with ASD.
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Brief report: Sleep disturbances in young children with type 1 diabetes.
Jaser SS, Lord JH, Simmons JH, Malow BA
(2016) Diabetes Res Clin Pract 120: 232-4
MeSH Terms: Child, Preschool, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Humans, Male, Parents, Pilot Projects, Sleep Wake Disorders, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added June 1, 2017
This multi-method study, including actigraphy, sleep diaries, and questionnaires, indicated significant sleep disturbances in young children with type 1 diabetes (age 3-5) and insufficient sleep duration in children and their parents. Results provide initial support for sleep as a potential target to improve both diabetes outcomes and parental distress.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms
Fitting meta-analytic structural equation models with complex datasets.
Wilson SJ, Polanin JR, Lipsey MW
(2016) Res Synth Methods 7: 121-39
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Child, Preschool, Computer Simulation, Cross-Sectional Studies, Databases, Bibliographic, Educational Measurement, Effect Modifier, Epidemiologic, Female, Humans, Infant, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Meta-Analysis as Topic, Models, Statistical, Models, Theoretical, Parent-Child Relations, Parents, Programming Languages, Regression Analysis, Reproducibility of Results, Statistics as Topic
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
A modification of the first stage of the standard procedure for two-stage meta-analytic structural equation modeling for use with large complex datasets is presented. This modification addresses two common problems that arise in such meta-analyses: (a) primary studies that provide multiple measures of the same construct and (b) the correlation coefficients that exhibit substantial heterogeneity, some of which obscures the relationships between the constructs of interest or undermines the comparability of the correlations across the cells. One component of this approach is a three-level random effects model capable of synthesizing a pooled correlation matrix with dependent correlation coefficients. Another component is a meta-regression that can be used to generate covariate-adjusted correlation coefficients that reduce the influence of selected unevenly distributed moderator variables. A non-technical presentation of these techniques is given, along with an illustration of the procedures with a meta-analytic dataset. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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21 MeSH Terms
Joint detection of copy number variations in parent-offspring trios.
Liu Y, Liu J, Lu J, Peng J, Juan L, Zhu X, Li B, Wang Y
(2016) Bioinformatics 32: 1130-7
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, DNA Copy Number Variations, Genome, Humans, Parents, Software
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
MOTIVATION - Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of parent-offspring trios is a powerful approach for identifying disease-associated genes via detecting copy number variations (CNVs). Existing approaches, which detect CNVs for each individual in a trio independently, usually yield low-detection accuracy. Joint modeling approaches leveraging Mendelian transmission within the parent-offspring trio can be an efficient strategy to improve CNV detection accuracy.
RESULTS - In this study, we developed TrioCNV, a novel approach for jointly detecting CNVs in parent-offspring trios from WGS data. Using negative binomial regression, we modeled the read depth signal while considering both GC content bias and mappability bias. Moreover, we incorporated the family relationship and used a hidden Markov model to jointly infer CNVs for three samples of a parent-offspring trio. Through application to both simulated data and a trio from 1000 Genomes Project, we showed that TrioCNV achieved superior performance than existing approaches.
AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION - The software TrioCNV implemented using a combination of Java and R is freely available from the website at https://github.com/yongzhuang/TrioCNV CONTACT: ydwang@hit.edu.cn
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION - Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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6 MeSH Terms