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N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an anti-oxidant, does not improve bone mechanical properties in a rat model of progressive chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder.
Allen MR, Wallace J, McNerney E, Nyman J, Avin K, Chen N, Moe S
(2020) PLoS One 15: e0230379
MeSH Terms: Acetylcysteine, Animals, Antioxidants, Caseins, Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Male, Mutation, Nuclear Proteins, Oxidative Stress, Parathyroid Hormone, Rats, Tibia, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
Individuals with chronic kidney disease have elevated levels of oxidative stress and are at a significantly higher risk of skeletal fracture. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in bone and compromise mechanical properties, are known to be driven in part by oxidative stress. The goal of this study was to study effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reducing oxidative stress and improving various bone parameters, most specifically mechanical properties, in an animal model of progressive CKD. Male Cy/+ (CKD) rats and unaffected littermates were untreated (controls) or treated with NAC (80 mg/kg, IP) from 30 to 35 weeks of age. Endpoint measures included serum biochemistries, assessments of systemic oxidative stress, bone morphology, and mechanical properties, and AGE levels in the bone. CKD rats had the expected phenotype that included low kidney function, elevated parathyroid hormone, higher cortical porosity, and compromised mechanical properties. NAC treatment had mixed effects on oxidative stress markers, significantly reducing TBARS (a measure of lipid peroxidation) while not affecting 8-OHdG (a marker of DNA oxidation) levels. AGE levels in the bone were elevated in CKD animals and were reduced with NAC although this did not translate to a benefit in bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, NAC failed to significantly improve bone architecture/geometry/mechanical properties in our rat model of progressive CKD.
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19 MeSH Terms
Daily parathyroid hormone administration enhances bone turnover and preserves bone structure after severe immobilization-induced bone loss.
Harlow L, Sahbani K, Nyman JS, Cardozo CP, Bauman WA, Tawfeek HA
(2017) Physiol Rep 5:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Density, Bone Remodeling, Cancellous Bone, Cortical Bone, Female, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Osteoporosis, Parathyroid Hormone, Spinal Cord Injuries
Show Abstract · Added October 1, 2017
Immobilization, as a result of motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI), is associated with severe osteoporosis. Whether parathyroid hormone (PTH) administration would reduce bone loss after SCI remains unclear. Thus, female mice underwent sham or surgery to produce complete spinal cord transection. PTH (80 g/kg) or vehicle was injected subcutaneously (SC) daily starting on the day of surgery and continued for 35 days. Isolated tibias and femurs were examined by microcomputed tomography scanning (micro-CT) and histology and serum markers of bone turnover were measured. Micro-CT analysis of tibial metaphysis revealed that the SCI-vehicle animals exhibited 49% reduction in fractional trabecular bone volume and 18% in trabecular thickness compared to sham-vehicle controls. SCI-vehicle animals also had 15% lower femoral cortical thickness and 16% higher cortical porosity than sham-vehicle counterparts. Interestingly, PTH administration to SCI animals restored 78% of bone volume, increased connectivity to 366%, and lowered structure model index by 10% compared to sham-vehicle animals. PTH further favorably attenuated femoral cortical bone loss to 5% and prevented the SCI-associated cortical porosity. Histomorphometry evaluation of femurs of SCI-vehicle animals demonstrated a marked 49% and 38% decline in osteoblast and osteoclast number, respectively, and 35% reduction in bone formation rate. In contrast, SCI-PTH animals showed preserved osteoblast and osteoclast numbers and enhanced bone formation rate. Furthermore, SCI-PTH animals had higher levels of bone formation and resorption markers than either SCI- or sham-vehicle groups. Collectively, these findings suggest that intermittent PTH receptor activation is an effective therapeutic strategy to preserve bone integrity after severe immobilization.
© 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.
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11 MeSH Terms
Prevention of breast cancer skeletal metastases with parathyroid hormone.
Swami S, Johnson J, Bettinson LA, Kimura T, Zhu H, Albertelli MA, Johnson RW, Wu JY
(2017) JCI Insight 2:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Neoplasms, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Cellular Microenvironment, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Heterografts, Liver Neoplasms, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Parathyroid Hormone, Splenic Neoplasms, Survival Analysis, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Advanced breast cancer is frequently associated with skeletal metastases and accelerated bone loss. Recombinant parathyroid hormone [teriparatide, PTH(1-34)] is the first anabolic agent approved in the US for treatment of osteoporosis. While signaling through the PTH receptor in the osteoblast lineage regulates bone marrow hematopoietic niches, the effects of anabolic PTH on the skeletal metastatic niche are unknown. Here, we demonstrate, using orthotopic and intratibial models of 4T1 murine and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer tumors, that anabolic PTH decreases both tumor engraftment and the incidence of spontaneous skeletal metastasis in mice. Microcomputed tomography and histomorphometric analyses revealed that PTH increases bone volume and reduces tumor engraftment and volume. Transwell migration assays with murine and human breast cancer cells revealed that PTH alters the gene expression profile of the metastatic niche, in particular VCAM-1, to inhibit recruitment of cancer cells. While PTH did not affect growth or migration of the primary tumor, it elicited several changes in the tumor gene expression profile resulting in a less metastatic phenotype. In conclusion, PTH treatment in mice alters the bone microenvironment, resulting in decreased cancer cell engraftment, reduced incidence of metastases, preservation of bone microarchitecture and prolonged survival.
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15 MeSH Terms
Genetic Variants Associated with Circulating Parathyroid Hormone.
Robinson-Cohen C, Lutsey PL, Kleber ME, Nielson CM, Mitchell BD, Bis JC, Eny KM, Portas L, Eriksson J, Lorentzon M, Koller DL, Milaneschi Y, Teumer A, Pilz S, Nethander M, Selvin E, Tang W, Weng LC, Wong HS, Lai D, Peacock M, Hannemann A, Völker U, Homuth G, Nauk M, Murgia F, Pattee JW, Orwoll E, Zmuda JM, Riancho JA, Wolf M, Williams F, Penninx B, Econs MJ, Ryan KA, Ohlsson C, Paterson AD, Psaty BM, Siscovick DS, Rotter JI, Pirastu M, Streeten E, März W, Fox C, Coresh J, Wallaschofski H, Pankow JS, de Boer IH, Kestenbaum B
(2017) J Am Soc Nephrol 28: 1553-1565
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Europe, Female, Genetic Variation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Hormone, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Show Abstract · Added September 19, 2017
Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a primary calcium regulatory hormone. Elevated serum PTH concentrations in primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism have been associated with bone disease, hypertension, and in some studies, cardiovascular mortality. Genetic causes of variation in circulating PTH concentrations are incompletely understood. We performed a genome-wide association study of serum PTH concentrations among 29,155 participants of European ancestry from 13 cohort studies (=22,653 and =6502 in discovery and replication analyses, respectively). We evaluated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with natural log-transformed PTH concentration adjusted for age, sex, season, study site, and principal components of ancestry. We discovered associations of SNPs from five independent regions with serum PTH concentration, including the strongest association with rs6127099 upstream of (=4.2 × 10), a gene that encodes the primary catabolic enzyme for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Each additional copy of the minor allele at this SNP associated with 7% higher serum PTH concentration. The other SNPs associated with serum PTH concentration included rs4074995 within (=6.6 × 10), rs219779 adjacent to (=3.5 × 10), rs4443100 near (=8.7 × 10), and rs73186030 near (=4.8 × 10). Of these five SNPs, rs6127099, rs4074995, and rs219779 replicated. Thus, common genetic variants located near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and calcium and renal phosphate transport associated with differences in circulating PTH concentrations. Future studies could identify the causal variants at these loci, and the clinical and functional relevance of these variants should be pursued.
Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.
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11 MeSH Terms
Hedgehog and TGFβ signaling converge on Gli2 to control bony invasion and bone destruction in oral squamous cell carcinoma.
Cannonier SA, Gonzales CB, Ely K, Guelcher SA, Sterling JA
(2016) Oncotarget 7: 76062-76075
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone and Bones, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Cell Line, Tumor, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression, Hedgehog Proteins, Heterografts, Humans, Mice, Mouth Neoplasms, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Nuclear Proteins, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein, Signal Transduction, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Zinc Finger Protein Gli2
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. OSCC invasion into the lymph nodes and mandible correlates with increased rates of recurrence and lower overall survival. Tumors that infiltrate mandibular bone proliferate rapidly and induce bone destruction. While survival rates have increased 12% over the last 20 years, this improvement is attributed to general advances in prevention, earlier detection, and updated treatments. Additionally, despite decades of research, the molecular mechanisms of OSCC invasion into the mandible are not well understood. Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein (PTHrP), has been shown to be essential for mandibular invasion in OSCC animal models, and our previous studies demonstrate that the transcription factor Gli2 increases PTHrP expression in tumor metastasis to bone. In OSCC, we investigated regulators of Gli2, including Hedgehog, TGFβ, and Wnt signaling to elucidate how PTHrP expression is controlled. Here we show that canonical Hedgehog and TGFβ signaling cooperate to increase PTHrP expression and mandibular invasion in a Gli2-dependent manner. Additionally, in an orthotopic model of mandibular invasion, inhibition of Gli2 using shRNA resulted in a significant decrease of both PTHrP expression and bony invasion. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that multiple signaling pathways converge on Gli2 to mediate PTHrP expression and bony invasion, highlighting Gli2 as a therapeutic target to prevent bony invasion in OSCC.
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17 MeSH Terms
Admixture mapping of serum vitamin D and parathyroid hormone concentrations in the African American-Diabetes Heart Study.
Palmer ND, Divers J, Lu L, Register TC, Carr JJ, Hicks PJ, Smith SC, Xu J, Judd SE, Irvin MR, Gutierrez OM, Bowden DW, Wagenknecht LE, Langefeld CD, Freedman BI
(2016) Bone 87: 71-7
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Demography, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Humans, Linkage Disequilibrium, Lod Score, Male, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Hormone, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Vitamin D
Show Abstract · Added September 29, 2016
Vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) concentrations differ between individuals of African and European descent and may play a role in observed racial differences in bone mineral density (BMD). These findings suggest that mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD) may be informative for identifying genetic variants contributing to these ethnic disparities. Admixture mapping was performed for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, vitamin D-binding protein (VDBP), bioavailable vitamin D, and iPTH concentrations and computed tomography measured thoracic and lumbar vertebral volumetric BMD in 552 unrelated African Americans with type 2 diabetes from the African American-Diabetes Heart Study. Genotyping was performed using a custom Illumina ancestry informative marker (AIM) panel. For each AIM, the probability of inheriting 0, 1, or 2 copies of a European-derived allele was determined. Non-parametric linkage analysis was performed by testing for association between each AIM using these probabilities among phenotypes, accounting for global ancestry, age, and gender. Fine-mapping of MALD peaks was facilitated by genome-wide association study (GWAS) data. VDBP levels were significantly linked in proximity to the protein coding locus (rs7689609, LOD=11.05). Two loci exhibited significant linkage signals for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D on 13q21.2 (rs1622710, LOD=3.20) and 12q13.2 (rs11171526, LOD=3.10). iPTH was significantly linked on 9q31.3 (rs7854368, LOD=3.14). Fine-mapping with GWAS data revealed significant known (rs7041 with VDBP, P=1.38×10(-82)) and novel (rs12741813 and rs10863774 with VDBP, P<6.43×10(-5)) loci with plausible biological roles. Admixture mapping in combination with fine-mapping has focused efforts to identify loci contributing to ethnic differences in vitamin D-related traits.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Parathyroid Hormone and the Use of Diuretics and Calcium-Channel Blockers: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
Zaheer S, de Boer I, Allison M, Brown JM, Psaty BM, Robinson-Cohen C, Ix JH, Kestenbaum B, Siscovick D, Vaidya A
(2016) J Bone Miner Res 31: 1137-45
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Bone Density, Calcium, Calcium Channel Blockers, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Hormone, Sodium Chloride Symporter Inhibitors
Show Abstract · Added September 19, 2017
Thiazide diuretic (TZ) use is associated with higher bone mineral density, whereas loop diuretic (LD) use is associated with lower bone density and incident fracture. Dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels are expressed on parathyroid cells and may play a role in parathyroid hormone (PTH) regulation. The potential for diuretics and calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) to modulate PTH and calcium homeostasis may represent a mechanism by which they influence skeletal outcomes. We hypothesized that the use of LD and dihydropyridine CCBs is associated with higher PTH, and TZ use is associated with lower PTH. We conducted cross-sectional analyses of participants treated for hypertension in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who did not have primary hyperparathyroidism or chronic kidney disease (n = 1888). We used adjusted regression models to evaluate the independent association between TZ, LD, and CCB medication classes and PTH. TZ use was associated with lower PTH when compared with non-TZ use (44.4 versus 46.9 pg/mL, p = 0.02), whereas the use of LD and CCBs was associated with higher PTH when compared with non-users of each medication class (LD: 60.7 versus 45.5 pg/mL, p < 0.0001; CCB: 49.5 versus. 44.4 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). Adjusted regression models confirmed independent associations between TZ use and lower PTH (β = -3.2 pg/mL, p = 0.0007), and LD or CCB use and higher PTH (LD: β = +12.0 pg/mL, p < 0.0001; CCB: +3.7 pg/mL, p < 0.0001). Among CCB users, the use of dihydropyridines was independently associated with higher PTH (β = +5.0 pg/mL, p < 0.0001), whereas non-dihydropyridine use was not (β = +0.58 pg/mL, p = 0.68). We conclude that in a large community-based cohort with normal kidney function, TZ use is associated with lower PTH, whereas LD and dihydropyridine CCB use is associated with higher PTH. These associations may provide a mechanistic explanation linking use of these medications to the development of skeletal outcomes. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
© 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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12 MeSH Terms
Raloxifene improves skeletal properties in an animal model of cystic chronic kidney disease.
Newman CL, Creecy A, Granke M, Nyman JS, Tian N, Hammond MA, Wallace JM, Brown DM, Chen N, Moe SM, Allen MR
(2016) Kidney Int 89: 95-104
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Urea Nitrogen, Bone Density Conservation Agents, Bone Remodeling, Collagen, Disease Models, Animal, Femur, Male, Mechanical Phenomena, Parathyroid Hormone, Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant, Raloxifene Hydrochloride, Rats, Renal Insufficiency, Chronic, Spine
Show Abstract · Added November 23, 2015
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of fracture. Raloxifene is a mild antiresorptive agent that reduces fracture risk in the general population. Here we assessed the impact of raloxifene on the skeletal properties of animals with progressive CKD. Male Cy/+ rats that develop autosomal dominant cystic kidney disease were treated with either vehicle or raloxifene for five weeks. They were assessed for changes in mineral metabolism and skeletal parameters (microCT, histology, whole-bone mechanics, and material properties). Their normal littermates served as controls. Animals with CKD had significantly higher parathyroid hormone levels compared with normal controls, as well as inferior structural and mechanical skeletal properties. Raloxifene treatment resulted in lower bone remodeling rates and higher cancellous bone volume in the rats with CKD. Although it had little effect on cortical bone geometry, it resulted in higher energy to fracture and modulus of toughness values than vehicle-treated rats with CKD, achieving levels equivalent to normal controls. Animals treated with raloxifene had superior tissue-level mechanical properties as assessed by nanoindentation, and higher collagen D-periodic spacing as assessed by atomic force microscopy. Thus, raloxifene can positively impact whole-bone mechanical properties in CKD through its impact on skeletal material properties.
Copyright © 2015 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
2 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Calcium/magnesium intake ratio, but not magnesium intake, interacts with genetic polymorphism in relation to colorectal neoplasia in a two-phase study.
Zhu X, Shrubsole MJ, Ness RM, Hibler EA, Cai Q, Long J, Chen Z, Li G, Jiang M, Hou L, Kabagambe EK, Zhang B, Smalley WE, Edwards TL, Giovannucci EL, Zheng W, Dai Q
(2016) Mol Carcinog 55: 1449-57
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Calcium, Dietary, Clinical Trials, Phase I as Topic, Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Magnesium, Male, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Hormone, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, TRPM Cation Channels
Show Abstract · Added September 28, 2015
Some studies suggest that the calcium to magnesium ratio intakes modify the associations of calcium or magnesium with risk of colorectal adenoma, adenoma recurrence, and cancer. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a key role in the regulation of homeostasis for both calcium and magnesium. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in PTH and 13 other genes may modify the association between the calcium/magnesium intake ratio and colorectal neoplasia risk. We conducted a two-phase study including 1336 cases and 2891 controls from the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study. In Phase I, we identified 19 SNPs that significantly interacted with the calcium/magnesium intake ratio in adenoma risk. In Phase II, rs11022858 in PTH was replicated. In combined analysis of phases I and II, we found high calcium/magnesium intake ratio tended to be associated with a reduced risk of colorectal adenoma (P for trend, 0.040) among those who carried the TT genotype in rs11022858. In stratified analyses, calcium intake (≥ 1000 mg/d) was significantly associated with 64% reduced adenoma risk (OR = 0.36 (95% CI : 0.18-0.74)) among those homozygous for the minor allele (TT genotype) (P for trend, 0.012), but not associated with risk in other genotypes (CC/TC). Conversely, we found that highest magnesium intake was significantly associated with 27% reduced risk (OR = 0.73 (95% CI : 0.54-0.97)) of colorectal adenoma (P for trend, 0.026) among those who possessed the CC/TC genotypes, particularly among those with the TC genotype, whereas magnesium intake was not linked to risk among those with the TT genotype. These findings, if confirmed, will help for the development of personalized prevention strategies for colorectal cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
© 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Vitamin D metabolites and bone mineral density: The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.
van Ballegooijen AJ, Robinson-Cohen C, Katz R, Criqui M, Budoff M, Li D, Siscovick D, Hoofnagle A, Shea SJ, Burke G, de Boer IH, Kestenbaum B
(2015) Bone 78: 186-93
MeSH Terms: African Americans, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Bone Density, Bone and Bones, Chromatography, Liquid, Cross-Sectional Studies, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Fracture Healing, Fractures, Bone, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mass Spectrometry, Middle Aged, Parathyroid Hormone, Regression Analysis, United States, Vitamin D, Vitamin D Deficiency
Show Abstract · Added September 19, 2017
Previous studies demonstrate associations of low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations with low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures, motivating widespread use of vitamin D supplements for bone health. However, previous studies have been limited to predominantly White populations despite differences in the distribution and metabolism of 25(OH)D by race/ethnicity. We determined associations of serum 25(OH)D, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (24,25(OH2)D3), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) with BMD among 1773 adult participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) in a staggered cross-sectional study design. Vitamin D metabolites were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and PTH using a 2-site immunoassay from serum collected in 2000-2002. Volumetric trabecular lumbar BMD was measured from computed tomography scans performed in 2002-2005 expressed as g/cm(3). We used linear regression and graphical methods to compare associations of vitamin D metabolite and PTH concentrations with BMD as the outcomes measure among White (n=714), Black (n=353), Chinese (n=249), and Hispanic (n=457) participants. Serum 25(OH)D and 24,25(OH2)D3 concentrations were highest among Whites and lowest among Blacks. BMD was greatest among Black participants. Higher serum 25(OH)D was only associated with higher BMD among Whites and Chinese participants (P-for-interaction=0.054). Comparing the lowest category of 25(OH)D (<20 ng/ml) to the highest (≥30 ng/ml), the adjusted mean difference in BMD was -8.1g/cm3 (95% CI -14.8, -1.4) for Whites; -10.2g/cm3 (-20.4, 0.0) for Chinese vs. 8.8 g/cm3 (-2.8, 20.5) for Black and -1.1g/cm3 (-8.3, 6.2) for Hispanic. Similar results were observed for serum 24,25(OH2)D3. Serum PTH was not associated with BMD. In a multi-ethnic population, associations of 25(OH)D with BMD were strongest among White and Chinese participants and null among Black and Hispanic participants. Further studies are needed to determine optimal biomarkers for bone health for multiple ethnic groups.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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24 MeSH Terms