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p120 Catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas.
Hendley AM, Provost E, Bailey JM, Wang YJ, Cleveland MH, Blake D, Bittman RW, Roeser JC, Maitra A, Reynolds AB, Leach SD
(2015) Dev Biol 399: 41-53
MeSH Terms: Adherens Junctions, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cadherins, Catenins, Cytoskeleton, Epithelial Cells, Epithelium, Female, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Confocal, Pancreas, Pancreatitis, Chronic, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, alpha Catenin, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120(f/f) pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
Three Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Have Distinct Histochemical Features Reflecting Epstein-Barr Virus Infection Status and Neuroendocrine Differentiation.
Speck O, Tang W, Morgan DR, Kuan PF, Meyers MO, Dominguez RL, Martinez E, Gulley ML
(2015) Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol 23: 633-45
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine, Cell Differentiation, Chromogranin A, Epithelial Cells, Epstein-Barr Virus Infections, Gastric Mucosa, Gastrins, Gene Expression, Genetic Heterogeneity, Herpesvirus 4, Human, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence, Lectins, C-Type, Pancreatitis-Associated Proteins, Prognosis, Stomach, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2016
Current histopathologic classification schemes for gastric adenocarcinoma have limited clinical utility and are difficult to apply due to tumor heterogeneity. Elucidation of molecular subtypes of gastric cancer may contribute to our understanding of gastric cancer biology and to the development of new molecular markers that may lead to improved diagnosis, therapy, or prognosis. We previously demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected gastric cancers have a distinct human gene expression profile compared with uninfected cancers. We now examine the histopathologic features characterizing infected (n=14) and uninfected (n=89) cancers; the latter of which are now further divided into 2 major molecular subtypes based on expression patterns of 93 RNAs. One uninfected gastric cancer subtype was distinguished by upregulation of 3 genes with neuroendocrine (NE) function (CHGA, GAST, and REG4 encoding chromogranin, gastrin, and the secreted peptide REG4 involved in epithelial cell regeneration), implicating hormonal factors in the pathogenesis of a major class of gastric adenocarcinomas. Evidence of NE differentiation (molecular, immunohistochemical, or morphologic) was mutually exclusive of EBV infection. EBV-infected tumors tended to have solid-type morphology with lymphoid stroma. This study reveals novel molecular subtypes of gastric cancer and their associated morphologies that demonstrate divergent NE features.
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19 MeSH Terms
Differentiation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from chronic pancreatitis by PAM4 immunohistochemistry.
Shi C, Merchant N, Newsome G, Goldenberg DM, Gold DV
(2014) Arch Pathol Lab Med 138: 220-8
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Neoplasm, Biomarkers, Tumor, Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal, Diagnosis, Differential, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Mucin-1, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Pancreas, Pancreatectomy, Pancreatic Cyst, Pancreatic Ducts, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreatitis, Chronic, Precancerous Conditions, Tissue Array Analysis
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
CONTEXT - PAM4 is a monoclonal antibody that shows high specificity for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and its neoplastic precursor lesions. A PAM4-based serum immunoassay is able to detect 71% of early-stage patients and 91% with advanced disease. However, approximately 20% of patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis (CP) are also positive for circulating PAM4 antigen. The specificity of the PAM4 antibody is critical to the interpretation of the serum-based and immunohistochemical assays for detection of PDAC.
OBJECTIVE - To determine whether PAM4 can differentiate PDAC from nonneoplastic lesions of the pancreas.
DESIGN - Tissue microarrays of PDAC (N = 43) and surgical specimens from CP (N = 32) and benign cystic lesions (N = 19) were evaluated for expression of the PAM4 biomarker, MUC1, MUC4, CEACAM5/6, and CA19-9.
RESULTS - PAM4 and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to MUC1, MUC4, CEACAM5/6, and CA19-9 were each reactive with the majority of PDAC cases; however, PAM4 was the only monoclonal antibody not to react with adjacent, nonneoplastic parenchyma. Although PAM4 labeled 19% (6 of 32) of CP specimens, reactivity was restricted to pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia associated with CP; inflamed tissues were negative in all cases. In contrast, MUC1, MUC4, CEACAM5/6, and CA19-9 were detected in 90%, 78%, 97%, and 100% of CP, respectively, with reactivity also present in nonneoplastic inflamed tissue.
CONCLUSIONS - PAM4 was the only monoclonal antibody able to differentiate PDAC (and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia precursor lesions) from benign, nonneoplastic tissues of the pancreas. These results suggest the use of PAM4 for evaluation of tissue specimens, and support its role as an immunoassay for detection of PDAC.
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17 MeSH Terms
Identification and manipulation of biliary metaplasia in pancreatic tumors.
Delgiorno KE, Hall JC, Takeuchi KK, Pan FC, Halbrook CJ, Washington MK, Olive KP, Spence JR, Sipos B, Wright CV, Wells JM, Crawford HC
(2014) Gastroenterology 146: 233-44.e5
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bile Ducts, Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, HMGB Proteins, Humans, Metaplasia, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Pancreatic Ducts, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreatitis, Precancerous Conditions, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), SOXF Transcription Factors, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added January 17, 2014
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Metaplasias often have characteristics of developmentally related tissues. Pancreatic metaplastic ducts are usually associated with pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The tuft cell is a chemosensory cell that responds to signals in the extracellular environment via effector molecules. Commonly found in the biliary tract, tuft cells are absent from normal murine pancreas. Using the aberrant appearance of tuft cells as an indicator, we tested if pancreatic metaplasia represents transdifferentiation to a biliary phenotype and what effect this has on pancreatic tumorigenesis.
METHODS - We analyzed pancreatic tissue and tumors that developed in mice that express an activated form of Kras (Kras(LSL-G12D/+);Ptf1a(Cre/+) mice). Normal bile duct, pancreatic duct, and tumor-associated metaplasias from the mice were analyzed for tuft cell and biliary progenitor markers, including SOX17, a transcription factor that regulates biliary development. We also analyzed pancreatic tissues from mice expressing transgenic SOX17 alone (ROSA(tTa/+);Ptf1(CreERTM/+);tetO-SOX17) or along with activated Kras (ROSAtT(a/+);Ptf1a(CreERTM/+);tetO-SOX17;Kras(LSL-G12D;+)).
RESULTS - Tuft cells were frequently found in areas of pancreatic metaplasia, decreased throughout tumor progression, and absent from invasive tumors. Analysis of the pancreatobiliary ductal systems of mice revealed tuft cells in the biliary tract but not the normal pancreatic duct. Analysis for biliary markers revealed expression of SOX17 in pancreatic metaplasia and tumors. Pancreas-specific overexpression of SOX17 led to ductal metaplasia along with inflammation and collagen deposition. Mice that overexpressed SOX17 along with Kras(G12D) had a greater degree of transformed tissue compared with mice expressing only Kras(G12D). Immunofluorescence analysis of human pancreatic tissue arrays revealed the presence of tuft cells in metaplasia and early-stage tumors, along with SOX17 expression, consistent with a biliary phenotype.
CONCLUSIONS - Expression of Kras(G12D) and SOX17 in mice induces development of metaplasias with a biliary phenotype containing tuft cells. Tuft cells express a number of tumorigenic factors that can alter the microenvironment. Expression of SOX17 induces pancreatitis and promotes Kras(G12D)-induced tumorigenesis in mice.
Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
The plastic pancreas.
Ziv O, Glaser B, Dor Y
(2013) Dev Cell 26: 3-7
MeSH Terms: Acinar Cells, Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal, Cell Death, Cell Dedifferentiation, Cell Differentiation, Cellular Reprogramming, Endocrine Cells, Humans, Pancreas, Pancreatitis, Regeneration, Stem Cells
Show Abstract · Added August 14, 2013
Pancreas homeostasis is based on replication of differentiated cells in order to maintain proper organ size and function under changing physiological demand. Recent studies suggest that acinar cells, the most abundant cell type in the pancreas, are facultative progenitors capable of reverting to embryonic-like multipotent progenitor cells under injury conditions associated with inflammation. In parallel, it is becoming apparent that within the endocrine pancreas, hormone-producing cells can lose or switch their identity under metabolic stress or in response to single gene mutations. This new view of pancreas dynamics suggests interesting links between pancreas regeneration and pathologies including diabetes and pancreatic cancer.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Nr5a2 maintains acinar cell differentiation and constrains oncogenic Kras-mediated pancreatic neoplastic initiation.
von Figura G, Morris JP, Wright CV, Hebrok M
(2014) Gut 63: 656-64
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinoma, Acinar Cell, Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Ceruletide, Mice, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreatitis, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
OBJECTIVES - Emerging evidence from mouse models suggests that mutant Kras can drive the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) precursors from acinar cells by enforcing ductal de-differentiation at the expense of acinar identity. Recently, human genome-wide association studies have identified NR5A2, a key regulator of acinar function, as a susceptibility locus for human PDA. We investigated the role of Nr5a2 in exocrine maintenance, regeneration and Kras driven neoplasia.
DESIGN - To investigate the function of Nr5a2 in the pancreas, we generated mice with conditional pancreatic Nr5a2 deletion (PdxCre(late); Nr5a2(c/c)). Using this model, we evaluated acinar differentiation, regeneration after caerulein pancreatitis and Kras driven pancreatic neoplasia in the setting of Nr5a2 deletion.
RESULTS - We show that Nr5a2 is not required for the development of the pancreatic acinar lineage but is important for maintenance of acinar identity. Nr5a2 deletion leads to destabilisation of the mature acinar differentiation state, acinar to ductal metaplasia and loss of regenerative capacity following acute caerulein pancreatitis. Loss of Nr5a2 also dramatically accelerates the development of oncogenic Kras driven acinar to ductal metaplasia and PDA precursor lesions.
CONCLUSIONS - Nr5a2 is a key regulator of acinar plasticity. It is required for maintenance of acinar identity and re-establishing acinar fate during regeneration. Nr5a2 also constrains pancreatic neoplasia driven by oncogenic Kras, providing functional evidence supporting a potential role as a susceptibility gene for human PDA.
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13 MeSH Terms
Factors influencing readmission after pancreaticoduodenectomy: a multi-institutional study of 1302 patients.
Ahmad SA, Edwards MJ, Sutton JM, Grewal SS, Hanseman DJ, Maithel SK, Patel SH, Bentram DJ, Weber SM, Cho CS, Winslow ER, Scoggins CR, Martin RC, Kim HJ, Baker JJ, Merchant NB, Parikh AA, Kooby DA
(2012) Ann Surg 256: 529-37
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Ampulla of Vater, Common Bile Duct Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreaticoduodenectomy, Pancreatitis, Chronic, Patient Readmission, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Survival Analysis
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2014
OBJECTIVE AND BACKGROUND - Morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) have significantly decreased over recent decades. Despite this progress, early readmission rates after PD have been reported as high as 50%. Few reports have delineated factors associated with readmission after PD.
METHODS - The medical records of 6 high-volume institutions were reviewed for patients who underwent PD between 2005 and 2010. Data collection included patient characteristics, medical comorbidities, and perioperative factors. Analysis included readmissions up to 90 days after PD.
RESULTS - A total of 1302 patients underwent PD across all institutions. The 30-day and 90-day readmission rates were 15% and 19%, respectively. The most common reasons for 30-day readmission included infectious complications (n = 65) and delayed gastric emptying (n = 29). The most common reasons for readmission after 90 days included wound infections and intra-abdominal abscess (n = 75) and failure to thrive (n = 38). On multivariate analysis, factors associated with higher readmission rates included a preoperative diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, higher transfusion requirements, and postoperative complications including intra-abdominal abscess and pancreatic fistula (all P < 0.02). Factors not associated with higher readmission rates included advanced age, body mass index, cardiovascular/pulmonary comorbidities, diabetes, steroid use, Whipple type (standard vs pylorus preserving PD), preoperative endobiliary stenting, and vascular reconstruction.
CONCLUSIONS - These multi-institutional data represent a large experience of PD without the biases typically of single center studies. Factors related to infection, nutritional status, and delayed gastric emptying were the most common reasons for readmission after PD. Postoperative complications including pancreatic fistula predicted higher rates of readmission.
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17 MeSH Terms
Serum HSP70: a novel biomarker for early detection of pancreatic cancer.
Dutta SK, Girotra M, Singla M, Dutta A, Otis Stephen F, Nair PP, Merchant NB
(2012) Pancreas 41: 530-4
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Analysis of Variance, Biomarkers, Tumor, Blotting, Western, Diagnosis, Differential, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins, Humans, Immunoelectrophoresis, Male, Middle Aged, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreatitis, Chronic, ROC Curve, Sensitivity and Specificity
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2014
OBJECTIVES - Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. To determine if serum HSP70 levels are elevated in patients with pancreatic cancer and can function as a biomarker for early detection of pancreatic cancer.
METHODS - Study subjects were divided into 3 groups: histologically proven pancreatic cancer (PC; n = 23), chronic pancreatitis (CP; n = 12), and matched normal control subjects (C; n = 10). Serum HSP70 levels were determined using a novel immunoelectrophoresis method developed and validated by the authors. Significance of difference between the groups was analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to discriminate patients with pancreatic cancer from normal controls.
RESULTS - The mean ± SE serum HSP70 levels in the PC, CP, and C groups were 1.68 ± 0.083 ng/mL, 0.40 ± 0.057 ng/mL, and 0.04 ng/mL, respectively. Serum HSP70 levels in the PC group were significantly higher compared with either the CP or C groups (P < 0.01). The sensitivity and specificity of elevated serum HSP70 in the PC group was 74% and 90%, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - Serum HSP70 levels are significantly increased in patients with pancreatic cancer and may be useful as an additional biomarker for the detection of pancreatic cancer.
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16 MeSH Terms
The combined expression of metaplasia biomarkers predicts the prognosis of gastric cancer.
Suh YS, Lee HJ, Jung EJ, Kim MA, Nam KT, Goldenring JR, Yang HK, Kim WH
(2012) Ann Surg Oncol 19: 1240-9
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cadherins, Female, Galectin 4, Gene Expression Profiling, Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Keratin-20, Lectins, C-Type, Male, Metaplasia, Middle Aged, Mucin 5AC, Mucins, Neoplasm Staging, Pancreatitis-Associated Proteins, Prognosis, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2013
BACKGROUND - Our previous study indicated that gene expression profiling of intestinal metaplasia (IM) or spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) can identify useful prognostic markers of early-stage gastric cancer, and seven metaplasia biomarkers (MUC13, CDH17, OLFM4, KRT20, LGALS4, MUC5AC, and REG4) were selectively expressed in 17-50% of gastric cancer tissues. We investigated whether the combined expression of these metaplasia biomarkers could predict the prognosis of advanced stage gastric cancer.
METHODS - The expression of seven metaplasia biomarkers was evaluated immunohistochemically using tissue microarrays comprised of 450 gastric cancer patients. The clinicopathologic correlations and the prognostic impact were analyzed according to the expression of multiple biomarkers.
RESULTS - MUC13, CDH17, LGALS4, and REG4 were significant prognostic biomarkers in univariate analysis. No expression of four markers was found in 56 cases (14.2%); 1 marker was seen in 67 cases (17%), 2 in 106 cases (27%), 3 in 101 cases (25.7%), and 4 in 63 cases (16%). Patients in which two or fewer proteins were expressed (group B) showed younger age, undifferentiated or diffuse type cancer, larger tumor size, larger number of metastatic lymph nodes, and more advanced stage than those in which three or more proteins were expressed (group A). In undifferentiated or stage II/III gastric cancer, the prognosis of group B was significantly poorer than that of group A by multivariate analysis.
CONCLUSIONS - The combined loss of expression of multiple metaplasia biomarkers is considered an independent prognostic indicator in undifferentiated or stage II/III gastric cancer.
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20 MeSH Terms
Variations of oral microbiota are associated with pancreatic diseases including pancreatic cancer.
Farrell JJ, Zhang L, Zhou H, Chia D, Elashoff D, Akin D, Paster BJ, Joshipura K, Wong DT
(2012) Gut 61: 582-8
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Bacteria, Bacterial Typing Techniques, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Metagenome, Middle Aged, Pancreatic Diseases, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreatitis, Chronic, Phylogeny, RNA, Bacterial, RNA, Ribosomal, 16S, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Saliva, Sensitivity and Specificity
Show Abstract · Added October 15, 2011
OBJECTIVE - The associations between oral diseases and increased risk of pancreatic cancer have been reported in several prospective cohort studies. In this study, we measured variations of salivary microbiota and evaluated their potential associations with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis.
METHODS - This study was divided into three phases: (1) microbial profiling using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray to investigate salivary microbiota variation between 10 resectable patients with pancreatic cancer and 10 matched healthy controls, (2) identification and verification of bacterial candidates by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and (3) validation of bacterial candidates by qPCR on an independent cohort of 28 resectable pancreatic cancer, 28 matched healthy control and 27 chronic pancreatitis samples.
RESULTS - Comprehensive comparison of the salivary microbiota between patients with pancreatic cancer and healthy control subjects revealed a significant variation of salivary microflora. Thirty-one bacterial species/clusters were increased in the saliva of patients with pancreatic cancer (n=10) in comparison to those of the healthy controls (n=10), whereas 25 bacterial species/clusters were decreased. Two out of six bacterial candidates (Neisseria elongata and Streptococcus mitis) were validated using the independent samples, showing significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between patients with pancreatic cancer and controls (n=56). Additionally, two bacteria (Granulicatella adiacens and S mitis) showed significant variation (p<0.05, qPCR) between chronic pancreatitis samples and controls (n=55). The combination of two bacterial biomarkers (N elongata and S mitis) yielded a receiver operating characteristic plot area under the curve value of 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.96, p<0.0001) with a 96.4% sensitivity and 82.1% specificity in distinguishing patients with pancreatic cancer from healthy subjects.
CONCLUSIONS - The authors observed associations between variations of patients' salivary microbiota with pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. This report also provides proof of salivary microbiota as an informative source for discovering non-invasive biomarkers of systemic diseases.
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20 MeSH Terms