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The Use of Indwelling Tunneled Pleural Catheters for Recurrent Pleural Effusions in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies: A Multicenter Study.
Gilbert CR, Lee HJ, Skalski JH, Maldonado F, Wahidi M, Choi PJ, Bessich J, Sterman D, Argento AC, Shojaee S, Gorden JA, Wilshire CL, Feller-Kopman D, Ortiz R, Nonyane BAS, Yarmus L
(2015) Chest 148: 752-758
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Catheters, Indwelling, Drainage, Female, Hematologic Neoplasms, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Palliative Care, Pleural Effusion, Malignant, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
BACKGROUND - Malignant pleural effusion is a common complication of advanced malignancies. Indwelling tunneled pleural catheter (IPC) placement provides effective palliation but can be associated with complications, including infection. In particular, hematologic malignancy and the associated immunosuppressive treatment regimens may increase infectious complications. This study aimed to review outcomes in patients with hematologic malignancy undergoing IPC placement.
METHODS - A retrospective multicenter study of IPCs placed in patients with hematologic malignancy from January 2009 to December 2013 was performed. Inclusion criteria were recurrent, symptomatic pleural effusion and an underlying diagnosis of hematologic malignancy. Records were reviewed for patient demographics, operative reports, and pathology, cytology, and microbiology reports.
RESULTS - Ninety-one patients (mean ± SD age, 65.4 ± 15.4 years) were identified from eight institutions. The mean × SD in situ dwell time of all catheters was 89.9 ± 127.1 days (total, 8,160 catheter-days). Seven infectious complications were identified, all of the pleural space. All patients were admitted to the hospital for treatment, with four requiring additional pleural procedures. Two patients died of septic shock related to pleural infection.
CONCLUSIONS - We present, to our knowledge, the largest study examining clinical outcomes related to IPC placement in patients with hematologic malignancy. An overall 7.7% infection risk and 2.2% mortality were identified, similar to previously reported studies, despite the significant immunosuppression and pancytopenia often present in this population. IPC placement appears to remain a reasonable clinical option for patients with recurrent pleural effusions related to hematologic malignancy.
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14 MeSH Terms
Infections associated with tunnelled indwelling pleural catheters in patients undergoing chemotherapy.
Mekhaiel E, Kashyap R, Mullon JJ, Maldonado F
(2013) J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol 20: 299-303
MeSH Terms: Aged, Antineoplastic Agents, Catheter-Related Infections, Catheters, Indwelling, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Palliative Care, Pleural Effusion, Malignant, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 1, 2016
BACKGROUND - Malignant pleural effusions are common complications of advanced malignancies and are associated with significant morbidity and reduced survival. Tunnelled indwelling pleural catheters (TIPCs) are implantable devices used for palliation of symptomatic malignant pleural effusions. Although complication rates are overall low, their use in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy has not been carefully reviewed. We report our experience with infectious complications directly attributable to TIPCs (pleural or local soft tissue infections) in those patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy.
METHODS - We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent TIPC placement for malignant pleural effusion in a 6-year period from November 2005 to March 2011. We reviewed the incidence of infection in these patients receiving catheter placement and attempted to determine whether chemotherapy was associated with an increased infectious risk.
RESULTS - A total of 262 TIPC procedures, performed in 243 patients, were included in the study. Out of 262, 173 (66%) TIPC were in the chemotherapy group and 89 TIPC were in the nonchemotherapy group. Infections developed in 16 of the 262 TIPC placements (6.1%). The rate of complications in the chemotherapy group was 9 of the 173 TIPCs (5.2%) compared with 7 of the 89 TIPCs (7.9%) in the other group, a difference that was not statistically different (P=0.4).
CONCLUSIONS - The overall risk of infection in TIPC is low. Patients undergoing chemotherapy while the TIPC is in place do not seem to have an increased risk of infection, and therefore chemotherapy should not necessarily be viewed as a contraindication to TIPC insertion.
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13 MeSH Terms
From qualitative work to intervention development in pediatric oncology palliative care research.
Akard TF, Gilmer MJ, Friedman DL, Given B, Hendricks-Ferguson VL, Hinds PS
(2013) J Pediatr Oncol Nurs 30: 153-60
MeSH Terms: Caregivers, Child, Humans, Neoplasms, Palliative Care, Qualitative Research
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
Qualitative methods can be particularly useful approaches to use with individuals who are experiencing a rare disease and thus who comprise a small sample (such as children with cancer) and are at points in care that few experience (such as end of life). This data-based methods article describes how findings from a qualitative study were used to guide and shape a pediatric oncology palliative care intervention. Qualitative data can lay a strong foundation for subsequent pilot intervention work by facilitating the development of an underlying study conceptualization, providing recruitment feasibility estimates, helping establish clinically meaningful inclusion criteria, establishing staff acceptability of a research intervention, and providing support for face validity of newly developed interventions. These benefits of preliminary qualitative research are described in the context of this study on legacy-making, which involves reports of children (7-12 years of age) living with advanced cancer and of their parent caregivers.
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6 MeSH Terms
Exploring the perceptions and the role of genetic counselors in the emerging field of perinatal palliative care.
Wool C, Dudek M
(2013) J Genet Couns 22: 533-43
MeSH Terms: Cross-Sectional Studies, Genetic Counseling, Humans, Palliative Care, Professional Role, Workforce
Show Abstract · Added February 16, 2017
Perinatal palliative care is a collaborative model of providing care to fetuses diagnosed with life-limiting conditions along with supportive care to parents. The study explored perceptions and current practice trends of genetic counselors related to this care. An ethics framework was used to structure the study. This cross-sectional, mixed method study was conducted to illuminate perceptions, practice barriers, familiarity with perinatal palliative care, clinician comfort, and referral comfort. The Perinatal Palliative Care Perceptions and Barriers Scale was self-administered online to 212 genetic counselors. Hierarchical multiple regression, used to test the hypothesis that perceptions, barriers to PPC, years of experience, personal comfort and prior familiarity with PPC explain variation in comfort of referral to PPC, yielded a significant overall R (2) of .51. These findings are the first data describing genetic counselors' perspectives and some of the factors contributing to referral comfort. Genetic counselors broadly endorsed the importance of palliative care concepts. They varied in their comfort with referral practices in ways that may be mitigated by increasing their familiarity with this evolving model of care.
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6 MeSH Terms
Interventional radiology and the pancreatic cancer patient.
Brown DB, Narayanan G
(2012) Cancer J 18: 591-601
MeSH Terms: Humans, Palliative Care, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Radiology, Interventional, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Patients with pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis. This article reviews the role that interventional radiology can play in managing postoperative complications and in patient palliation, particularly with an obstructed biliary system. In addition, options for cytoreduction are discussed, including chemoembolization, radioembolization, and thermal ablation. The final option reviewed is irreversible electroporation, which is being explored as a technique to allow patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer to be converted to surgical candidates.
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5 MeSH Terms
Adolescent and young adult oncology. Clinical practice guidelines in oncology.
Coccia PF, Altman J, Bhatia S, Borinstein SC, Flynn J, George S, Goldsby R, Hayashi R, Huang MS, Johnson RH, Beaupin LK, Link MP, Oeffinger KC, Orr KM, Pappo AS, Reed D, Spraker HL, Thomas DA, von Mehren M, Wechsler DS, Whelan KF, Zebrack BJ, Sundar H, Shead DA
(2012) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 10: 1112-50
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adolescent Medicine, Adult, Early Detection of Cancer, Fertility Preservation, Humans, Neoplasms, Palliative Care, Patient Compliance, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2014
Cancer is the leading cause of death among the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, excluding homicide, suicide, or unintentional injury. AYA patients should be managed by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals who are well-versed in the specific developmental issues relevant to this patient population. The recommendations for age-appropriate care outlined in these NCCN Guidelines include psychosocial assessment, a discussion of infertility risks associated with treatment and options for fertility preservation, genetic and familial risk assessment for all patients after diagnosis, screening and monitoring of late effects in AYA cancer survivors after successful completion of therapy, and palliative care and end-of-life considerations for patients for whom curative therapy fails.
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12 MeSH Terms
Perioperative plasma F(2)-Isoprostane levels correlate with markers of impaired ventilation in infants with single-ventricle physiology undergoing stage 2 surgical palliation on the cardiopulmonary bypass.
Albers E, Donahue BS, Milne G, Saville BR, Wang W, Bichell D, McLaughlin B
(2012) Pediatr Cardiol 33: 562-8
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Cardiopulmonary Bypass, F2-Isoprostanes, Follow-Up Studies, Heart Bypass, Right, Heart Defects, Congenital, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Infant, Mass Spectrometry, Oxidative Stress, Palliative Care, Perioperative Period, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Respiratory Function Tests, Respiratory Insufficiency
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2014
Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) produces inflammation and oxidative stress, which contribute to postoperative complications after cardiac surgery. F(2)-Isoprostanes (F(2)-IsoPs) are products of lipid oxidative injury and represent the most accurate markers of oxidative stress. In adults undergoing cardiac surgery, CPB is associated with elevated IsoPs. The relationship between F(2)-IsoPs and perioperative end-organ function in infants with single-ventricle physiology, however, has not been well studied. This study prospectively enrolled 20 infants (ages 3-12 months) with univentricular physiology undergoing elective stage 2 palliation (bidirectional cavopulmonary anastomosis). Blood samples were collected before the surgical incision (T0), 30 min after initiation of CPB (T1), immediately after separation from CPB (T2), and 24 h postoperatively (T3). Plasma F(2)-IsoP levels were measured at each time point and correlated with indices of pulmonary function and other relevant clinical variables. Plasma F(2)-IsoPs increased significantly during surgery, with highest levels seen immediately after separation from CPB (p < 0.001). After separation from CPB, increased F(2)-IsoP was associated with lower arterial pH (ρ = -0.564; p = 0.012), higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO(2); ρ = 0.633; p = 0.004), and decreased lung compliance (ρ = -0.783; p ≤ 0.001). After CPB, F(2)-IsoPs did not correlate with duration of CPB, arterial lactate, or immediate postoperative outcomes. In infants with single-ventricle physiology, CPB produces oxidative stress, as quantified by elevated F(2)-IsoP levels. Increased F(2)-IsoP levels correlated with impaired ventilation in the postoperative period. The extent to which F(2)-IsoPs and other bioactive products of lipid oxidative injury might predict or contribute to organ-specific stress warrants further investigation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancers.
Ajani JA, Barthel JS, Bentrem DJ, D'Amico TA, Das P, Denlinger CS, Fuchs CS, Gerdes H, Glasgow RE, Hayman JA, Hofstetter WL, Ilson DH, Keswani RN, Kleinberg LR, Korn WM, Lockhart AC, Mulcahy MF, Orringer MB, Osarogiagbon RU, Posey JA, Sasson AR, Scott WJ, Shibata S, Strong VE, Varghese TK, Warren G, Washington MK, Willett C, Wright CD, National Comprehensive Cancer Network
(2011) J Natl Compr Canc Netw 9: 830-87
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Combined Modality Therapy, Esophageal Neoplasms, Esophagogastric Junction, Esophagoscopy, Humans, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Neoplasm Staging, Palliative Care, Radiotherapy, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Added April 12, 2016
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13 MeSH Terms
Pediatric palliative care in childhood cancer nursing: from diagnosis to cure or end of life.
Foster TL, Lafond DA, Reggio C, Hinds PS
(2010) Semin Oncol Nurs 26: 205-21
MeSH Terms: Bereavement, Child, Communication, Culture, Ethics, Nursing, Humans, Neoplasms, Oncology Nursing, Palliative Care, Pediatric Nursing, Professional-Family Relations, Spirituality
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
OBJECTIVES - To describe selected components of pediatric palliative care from diagnosis to cure or end of life that combine to help nurses and other clinicians achieve goals of care for children with cancer and their families.
DATA SOURCES - Published articles.
CONCLUSION - Pediatric palliative care is characterized by diversity of care delivery models; effect of cancer on the family as the central focus of care; and consideration of culture, spirituality, communication, and ethical standards. End-of-life issues that can be anticipated by nurses and other clinicians include symptoms of cancer or its treatment, the importance of hopefulness, the relevance of trying to be a good parent in decision making, the meaning of legacy making of ill children, and family bereavement.
IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE - Direct nursing care strategies to achieve pediatric palliative care goals are vital to reduce child and family suffering from cancer.
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Personal reflections on legacy making.
Foster TL
(2010) Palliat Support Care 8: 99-100
MeSH Terms: Attitude to Death, Attitude to Health, Humans, Neoplasms, Palliative Care, Terminal Care
Added March 11, 2014
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6 MeSH Terms