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Computational Immune Monitoring Reveals Abnormal Double-Negative T Cells Present across Human Tumor Types.
Greenplate AR, McClanahan DD, Oberholtzer BK, Doxie DB, Roe CE, Diggins KE, Leelatian N, Rasmussen ML, Kelley MC, Gama V, Siska PJ, Rathmell JC, Ferrell PB, Johnson DB, Irish JM
(2019) Cancer Immunol Res 7: 86-99
MeSH Terms: Adenoids, Adult, Aged, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized, Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Female, Humans, Imidazoles, MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Immunologic, Neoplasms, Oximes, Palatine Tonsil, Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf, Pyridones, Pyrimidinones, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added November 11, 2018
Advances in single-cell biology have enabled measurements of >40 protein features on millions of immune cells within clinical samples. However, the data analysis steps following cell population identification are susceptible to bias, time-consuming, and challenging to compare across studies. Here, an ensemble of unsupervised tools was developed to evaluate four essential types of immune cell information, incorporate changes over time, and address diverse immune monitoring challenges. The four complementary properties characterized were (i) systemic plasticity, (ii) change in population abundance, (iii) change in signature population features, and (iv) novelty of cellular phenotype. Three systems immune monitoring studies were selected to challenge this ensemble approach. In serial biopsies of melanoma tumors undergoing targeted therapy, the ensemble approach revealed enrichment of double-negative (DN) T cells. Melanoma tumor-resident DN T cells were abnormal and phenotypically distinct from those found in nonmalignant lymphoid tissues, but similar to those found in glioblastoma and renal cell carcinoma. Overall, ensemble systems immune monitoring provided a robust, quantitative view of changes in both the system and cell subsets, allowed for transparent review by human experts, and revealed abnormal immune cells present across multiple human tumor types.
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
3 Communities
2 Members
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19 MeSH Terms
Cutting Edge: Redox Signaling Hypersensitivity Distinguishes Human Germinal Center B Cells.
Polikowsky HG, Wogsland CE, Diggins KE, Huse K, Irish JM
(2015) J Immunol 195: 1364-1367
MeSH Terms: B-Lymphocyte Subsets, B-Lymphocytes, Cell Differentiation, Gene Expression, Germinal Center, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Immunophenotyping, Oxidation-Reduction, Palatine Tonsil, Phenotype, Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Non-Receptor Type 6, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added July 13, 2015
Differences in the quality of BCR signaling control key steps of B cell maturation and differentiation. Endogenously produced H2O2 is thought to fine tune the level of BCR signaling by reversibly inhibiting phosphatases. However, relatively little is known about how B cells at different stages sense and respond to such redox cues. In this study, we used phospho-specific flow cytometry and high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare BCR signaling responses in mature human tonsillar B cells undergoing germinal center (GC) reactions. GC B cells, in contrast to mature naive B cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts, were hypersensitive to a range of H2O2 concentrations and responded by phosphorylating SYK and other membrane-proximal BCR effectors in the absence of BCR engagement. These findings reveal that stage-specific redox responses distinguish human GC B cells.
Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
3 Communities
3 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
High PD-1 expression and suppressed cytokine signaling distinguish T cells infiltrating follicular lymphoma tumors from peripheral T cells.
Myklebust JH, Irish JM, Brody J, Czerwinski DK, Houot R, Kohrt HE, Timmerman J, Said J, Green MR, Delabie J, Kolstad A, Alizadeh AA, Levy R
(2013) Blood 121: 1367-76
MeSH Terms: CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes, Cell Separation, Cells, Cultured, Child, Cytokines, E-Selectin, Flow Cytometry, Histiocytes, Humans, Interleukin-10, Interleukin-4, Interleukins, Leukocyte Common Antigens, Lymphoma, Follicular, Palatine Tonsil, Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor, Signal Transduction, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2013
Defects in T-cell function in patients with cancer might influence their capacity to mount efficient antitumor immune responses. Here, we identified highly reduced IL-4-, IL-10-, and IL-21-induced phosphorylation of STAT6 and STAT3 in tumor-infiltrating T cells (TILs) in follicular lymphoma (FL) tumors, contrasting other non-Hodgkin lymphoma TILs. By combining phospho-protein-specific flow cytometry with several T-cell markers, we identified that CD4(+)CD45RO(+)CD62L(-) FL TILs were largely nonresponsive to cytokines, in contrast to the corresponding autologous peripheral blood subset. We observed differential expression of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 in FL TILs and peripheral blood T cells. Furthermore, CD4(+)PD-1(hi) FL TILs, containing T(FH) and non-T(FH) cells, had lost their cytokine responsiveness, whereas PD-1 TILs had normal cytokine signaling. However, this phenomenon was not tumor specific, because tonsil T cells were similar to FL TILs. FL tumor cells were negative for PD-1 ligands, but PD-L1(+) histiocytes were found within the T cell-rich zone of the neoplastic follicles. Disruption of the microenvironment and in vitro culture of FL TILs could restore cytokine signaling in the PD-1(hi) subset. Because FL TILs in vivo probably receive suppressive signals through PD-1, this provides a rationale for testing PD-1 Ab in combination with immunotherapy in patients with FL.
1 Communities
1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Comparison of clonidine, local anesthetics, and placebo for pain reduction in pediatric tonsillectomy.
Moss JR, Cofer S, Hersey S, Goudy S, Werkhaven J, Swanson E, Mantle C, Stowell N, Byrne D, Wang L, Labadie R
(2011) Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 137: 591-7
MeSH Terms: Adenoids, Adolescent, Age Factors, Analgesics, Anesthetics, Local, Bupivacaine, Child, Child, Preschool, Clonidine, Dehydration, Diet, Double-Blind Method, Drug Therapy, Combination, Female, Humans, Hypertrophy, Injections, Lidocaine, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Pain Measurement, Pain, Postoperative, Palatine Tonsil, Premedication, Prospective Studies, Sleep Apnea Syndromes, Tonsillectomy, Tonsillitis
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
OBJECTIVE - To determine if pretonsillectomy injection of local anesthetics with and without clonidine reduces pain following tonsillectomy in children.
DESIGN - A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.
SETTING - Tertiary care academic medical center.
PATIENTS - A total of 120 children, ages 3 to 17 years, presenting for tonsillectomy.
INTERVENTIONS - Patients were randomized to 1 of 3 pretonsillectomy injection groups: (1) saline, (2) lidocaine plus bupivacaine, or (3) lidocaine plus bupivacaine plus clonidine.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - The total number of analgesic doses consumed on postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, 5, and 7. Secondary outcome variables included total time and intravenous analgesic doses required in the recovery room, visual analog scale pain scores, and maximum tolerated diet on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, and 7.
RESULTS - The total number of analgesic doses on PODs 1, 3, 5, and 7 were not significantly different between the randomization groups (P = .53). The median numbers (interquartile ranges) of analgesic doses were 12.0 (9.0-16.8) for the lidocaine plus bupivacaine plus clonidine group, 12.0 (10.0-16.5) for the lidocaine plus bupivacaine group, and 14.0 (9.0-15) for the placebo group. The placebo group was found to have a more advanced diet on POD 1 (P = .04) and significantly less pain on POD 3 (P = .02). Multivariable analysis showed children in the lidocaine plus bupivacaine plus clonidine group were significantly less likely to need intravenous pain medication in the recovery room compared with children in the placebo group and again showed that the placebo group achieved a significantly more advanced diet and had less pain on PODs 1 and 3.
CONCLUSION - Pretonsillectomy injection of lidocaine, 1%, and bupivacaine, 0.5%, with or without clonidine (25 μg) is not recommended for the reduction of posttonsillectomy pain.
TRIAL REGISTRATION - clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00678379.
0 Communities
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28 MeSH Terms
Comparative shotgun proteomics using spectral count data and quasi-likelihood modeling.
Li M, Gray W, Zhang H, Chung CH, Billheimer D, Yarbrough WG, Liebler DC, Shyr Y, Slebos RJ
(2010) J Proteome Res 9: 4295-305
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Chromatography, Liquid, Head and Neck Neoplasms, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Linear Models, Palatine Tonsil, Proteins, Proteomics, Software, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Shotgun proteomics provides the most powerful analytical platform for global inventory of complex proteomes using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and allows a global analysis of protein changes. Nevertheless, sampling of complex proteomes by current shotgun proteomics platforms is incomplete, and this contributes to variability in assessment of peptide and protein inventories by spectral counting approaches. Thus, shotgun proteomics data pose challenges in comparing proteomes from different biological states. We developed an analysis strategy using quasi-likelihood Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM), included in a graphical interface software package (QuasiTel) that reads standard output from protein assemblies created by IDPicker, an HTML-based user interface to query shotgun proteomic data sets. This approach was compared to four other statistical analysis strategies: Student t test, Wilcoxon rank test, Fisher's Exact test, and Poisson-based GLM. We analyzed the performance of these tests to identify differences in protein levels based on spectral counts in a shotgun data set in which equimolar amounts of 48 human proteins were spiked at different levels into whole yeast lysates. Both GLM approaches and the Fisher Exact test performed adequately, each with their unique limitations. We subsequently compared the proteomes of normal tonsil epithelium and HNSCC using this approach and identified 86 proteins with differential spectral counts between normal tonsil epithelium and HNSCC. We selected 18 proteins from this comparison for verification of protein levels between the individual normal and tumor tissues using liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM-MS). This analysis confirmed the magnitude and direction of the protein expression differences in all 6 proteins for which reliable data could be obtained. Our analysis demonstrates that shotgun proteomic data sets from different tissue phenotypes are sufficiently rich in quantitative information and that statistically significant differences in proteins spectral counts reflect the underlying biology of the samples.
0 Communities
3 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Human cyclo-oxygenase-1 and an alternative splice variant: contrasts in expression of mRNA, protein and catalytic activities.
Schneider C, Boeglin WE, Brash AR
(2005) Biochem J 385: 57-64
MeSH Terms: Alternative Splicing, Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Blotting, Western, Brain, Catalysis, Cell Line, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Cloning, Molecular, Colon, Cyclooxygenase 1, Humans, Membrane Proteins, Models, Molecular, Molecular Sequence Data, Palatine Tonsil, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Protein Biosynthesis, Protein Conformation, RNA, Messenger, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Sheep, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The two COX (cyclo-oxygenase) isoenzymes COX-1 and -2 catalyse the initial step in the conversion of arachidonic acid into PG (prostaglandin) hormones. The identification of an mRNA transcript encoding a splice variant of human COX-1 was reported more than a decade ago [Diaz, Reginato and Jimenez (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 10816-10822], yet catalytic activity and tissue expression of the corresponding spliced protein remained uncharacterized. The splice variant lacks amino acids 396-432, corresponding to the last 37 amino acids of exon 9 of the gene encoding COX-1. These amino acids form a loop at one side of the peroxidase active site of the protein. We expressed the full-length and spliced COX-1 cDNAs in COS-7 and Sf9 insect cells, and determined the PG-forming activity using incubations with radiolabelled arachidonic acid and HPLC analyses. When expressed in either system, abundant PG formation was observed with the full-length COX-1, whereas the spliced protein did not form any detectable product. Peroxidase activity was readily detected in microsomes prepared from COS-7 cells transfected with COX-1 but not with the splice variant. In reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments, we detected the mRNA for the alternatively spliced and full-length COX-1 in human brain, tonsil and colon tissue, yet we were unable to detect expression of the spliced protein in the same tissues using immunoprecipitation and Western-blot analyses. We conclude that, whereas the mRNA transcript for the spliced COX-1 is present in various human tissues, the corresponding protein is either not formed or subject to rapid proteolytic degradation.
0 Communities
2 Members
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23 MeSH Terms
Detection and cellular localization of 12R-lipoxygenase in human tonsils.
Schneider C, Keeney DS, Boeglin WE, Brash AR
(2001) Arch Biochem Biophys 386: 268-74
MeSH Terms: 12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid, Arachidonate 12-Lipoxygenase, Child, Child, Preschool, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Epithelial Cells, Expressed Sequence Tags, Germinal Center, Humans, Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids, In Situ Hybridization, Palatine Tonsil, Prostaglandins, RNA, Messenger
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Formation of the 12R-lipoxygenase product, 12R-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12R-HPETE), has been detected previously only in human skin (Boeglin et al. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 6744). The unexpected appearance of an EST sequence (AA649213) for human 12R-lipoxygenase from germinal center B lymphocytes purified from human tonsils prompted our search for the existence of the enzyme in this novel source. Incubation of [1-14C]arachidonic acid with homogenates of human tonsillar tissue yielded mixtures of radiolabeled 12-HETE and 15-HETE. Stereochemical analysis showed varying ratios of 12S- and 12R-HETE, while 15-HETE was exclusively of the S-configuration. Using stereospecifically labeled [10S-3H]- and [10R-3H]arachidonic acid substrates we detected pro-R hydrogen abstraction at carbon 10 associated with formation of 12R-HETE. This mechanistic evidence implicates a 12R-lipoxygenase in the biosynthesis of 12R-HETE. The mRNA for the enzyme was identified in tonsils by RT-PCR and Northern analysis. The cellular distribution was established by in situ hybridization. Unexpectedly, hybridization was not observed in the lymphocytes of the germinal centers. Specific reaction was restricted to squamous epithelial cells, including the epithelium lining the tonsillar crypts. In this location the 12R-lipoxygenase might help regulate differentiation of the epithelium or participate in lymphocyte- epithelial cell interactions.
0 Communities
2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
[The role of oncogenic human papillomaviruses in tonsillar squamous cell carcinomas with functional inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein].
Helbig M, Andl T, Kahn T, Klein-Kühne W, Conradt C, Dietz A, Bosch FX
(1999) HNO 47: 796-803
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Gene Expression Regulation, Viral, Humans, Lymphatic Metastasis, Neoplasm Staging, Oncogene Proteins, Viral, Palatine Tonsil, Papillomaviridae, Papillomavirus E7 Proteins, Papillomavirus Infections, Prognosis, Retinoblastoma Protein, Tonsillar Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added January 30, 2013
In order to identify squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (HNSCC) with common biological and clinical features, we investigated the incidence and properties of carcinomas lacking retinoblastoma protein (pR6) cell cycle control. Of 208 HNSCC investigated, 23 (11%) showed a lack of pRb expression. The majority of these tumors (65%) were tonsillar carcinomas. The pRb-negative tonsillar tumors were all stage IV, had metastasized to lymph nodes at the time of diagnosis and were in general poorly differentiated or undifferentiated. Very significantly, the pRb-negative phenotype was strongly associated with the presence of oncogenic human papilloma viruses, implying a viral etiology and functional inactivation of pRb by the viral E7 oncoprotein. Despite the very adverse histopathological factors, patients with pRb-negative tonsillar carcinomas had a better clinical outcome, which was consistent with a uniform favorable responsiveness of these tumors to postoperative radiation therapy.
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1 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Regulation of cathepsin E expression during human B cell differentiation in vitro.
Sealy L, Mota F, Rayment N, Tatnell P, Kay J, Chain B
(1996) Eur J Immunol 26: 1838-43
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, B-Lymphocytes, Base Sequence, Cathepsin E, Cathepsins, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Child, Child, Preschool, Epitopes, Humans, Infant, Lymphocyte Activation, Molecular Sequence Data, Palatine Tonsil, RNA, Messenger, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Cathepsin E is an aspartic proteinase which has been implicated in antigen processing in the class II major histocompatibility complex pathway. In this study we show that cathepsin E, measured at both the protein and message level, is up-regulated late in human B cell activation. The implications of this observation in terms of cathepsin E function are discussed.
0 Communities
1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Immunolocalization of integrin receptors in normal lymphoid tissues.
Zutter MM
(1991) Blood 77: 2231-6
MeSH Terms: Appendix, Flow Cytometry, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Integrins, Lymph Nodes, Lymphoid Tissue, Palatine Tonsil, Spleen, Thymus Gland
Show Abstract · Added February 16, 2014
The integrin superfamily of cell adhesion receptors consists of heterodimeric glycoproteins composed of unique alpha and beta subunits. These receptors mediate cell-substrate and cell-cell adhesive properties for a variety of cell types. This investigation has focused on the histologic distribution of the beta 1 subfamily of integrins within lymphoid tissues including tonsil, lymph node, spleen, thymus, and appendix. The dendritic cells of both follicular center and thymic origin express the alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 5, and alpha 6, as well as the beta 1 integrin subunits. Most lymphoid cells in normal tissues do not express the alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 5, and alpha 6 subunits, or the alpha v beta 3 integrin. The beta 1 subunit is expressed by all lymphocytes but with variable intensity. Increased levels of the alpha 5 and beta 1 subunits are observed in the follicular light zone, suggesting a role for these integrins in B-cell activation. Although the alpha 4 subunit is expressed by all lymphoid cells, an increased expression of alpha 4 and decreased expression of beta 1 by the mantle zone B-cell compartment is noted in comparison with the decreased expression of alpha 4 and increased expression of beta 1 by follicular center B-cells. These studies suggest that alpha 4 may be paired with a beta subunit other than beta 1 on the mantle zone lymphoid population. Thus, integrin expression by cells of lymphoid tissues varies with location and function and differs significantly from integrin expression observed on circulating and cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes.
1 Communities
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10 MeSH Terms