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Rapid Simulation of Unprocessed DEER Decay Data for Protein Fold Prediction.
Del Alamo D, Tessmer MH, Stein RA, Feix JB, Mchaourab HS, Meiler J
(2020) Biophys J 118: 366-375
MeSH Terms: Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Monte Carlo Method, Nitrogen Oxides, Protein Folding, Spin Labels, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2020
Despite advances in sampling and scoring strategies, Monte Carlo modeling methods still struggle to accurately predict de novo the structures of large proteins, membrane proteins, or proteins of complex topologies. Previous approaches have addressed these shortcomings by leveraging sparse distance data gathered using site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to improve protein structure prediction and refinement outcomes. However, existing computational implementations entail compromises between coarse-grained models of the spin label that lower the resolution and explicit models that lead to resource-intense simulations. These methods are further limited by their reliance on distance distributions, which are calculated from a primary refocused echo decay signal and contain uncertainties that may require manual refinement. Here, we addressed these challenges by developing RosettaDEER, a scoring method within the Rosetta software suite capable of simulating double electron-electron resonance spectroscopy decay traces and distance distributions between spin labels fast enough to fold proteins de novo. We demonstrate that the accuracy of resulting distance distributions match or exceed those generated by more computationally intensive methods. Moreover, decay traces generated from these distributions recapitulate intermolecular background coupling parameters even when the time window of data collection is truncated. As a result, RosettaDEER can discriminate between poorly folded and native-like models by using decay traces that cannot be accurately converted into distance distributions using regularized fitting approaches. Finally, using two challenging test cases, we demonstrate that RosettaDEER leverages these experimental data for protein fold prediction more effectively than previous methods. These benchmarking results confirm that RosettaDEER can effectively leverage sparse experimental data for a wide array of modeling applications built into the Rosetta software suite.
Copyright © 2019 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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6 MeSH Terms
Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 activation by Nox1-derived oxidants is required for TNFα receptor endocytosis.
Choi H, Stark RJ, Raja BS, Dikalova A, Lamb FS
(2019) Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 316: H1528-H1537
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Thoracic, Cells, Cultured, Endocytosis, MAP Kinase Kinase Kinase 5, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Muscle, Smooth, Vascular, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, NADPH Oxidase 1, Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I, Signal Transduction, Superoxides, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is closely linked to the development of cardiovascular disease. TNFα activates NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide (O), production extracellularly is required for subsequent signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase that is activated by oxidation of associated thioredoxin. The role of ASK1 in Nox1-mediated signaling by TNFα is poorly defined. We hypothesized that ASK1 is required for TNFα receptor endocytosis and subsequent inflammatory TNFα signaling. We employed a knockdown strategy to explore the role of ASK1 in TNFα signaling in VSMCs. siRNA targeting ASK1 had no effect on TNFα-induced extracellular O production. However, siASK1 inhibited receptor endocytosis as well as phosphorylation of two endocytosis-related proteins, dynamin1 and caveolin1. Intracellular O production was subsequently reduced, as were other inflammatory signaling steps including NF-κB activation, IL-6 production, inducible nitric oxide synthase and VCAM expression, and VSMC proliferation. Prolonged exposure to TNFα (24 h) increased tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) subtype 1 and 2 expression, and these effects were also attenuated by siASK1. ASK1 coimmunoprecipitated with both Nox1 and the leucine rich repeat containing 8A anion channel, two essential components of the TNFR1 signaling complex. Activation of ASK1 by autophosphorylation at Thr845 occurs following thioredoxin dissociation, and this requires the presence of Nox1. Thus, Nox1 is part of the multiprotein ASK1 signaling complex. In response to TNFα, ASK1 is activated by Nox1-derived oxidants, and this plays a critical role in translating these ROS into a physiologic response in VSMCs. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) drives dynamin1 and caveolin1 phosphorylation and TNFα receptor endocytosis. ASK1 modulates TNFα-induced NF-κB activation, survival, and proliferation. ASK1 and NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) physically associate in a multiprotein signaling complex. Nox1 is required for TNFα-induced ASK1 activation.
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13 MeSH Terms
Gastroesophageal Reflux Induces Protein Adducts in the Esophagus.
Caspa Gokulan R, Adcock JM, Zagol-Ikapitte I, Mernaugh R, Williams P, Washington KM, Boutaud O, Oates JA, Dikalov SI, Zaika AI
(2019) Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 7: 480-482.e7
MeSH Terms: Acetylcysteine, Animals, Benzylamines, Bile Acids and Salts, Cell Line, Cyclic N-Oxides, Esophagus, Gastroesophageal Reflux, Humans, Lipids, Mice, Spin Labels, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Added March 26, 2019
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13 MeSH Terms
Use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in Biological Samples at Ambient Temperature and 77 K.
Elajaili HB, Hernandez-Lagunas L, Ranguelova K, Dikalov S, Nozik-Grayck E
(2019) J Vis Exp :
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antimycin A, Bleomycin, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid, Cattle, Cell Compartmentation, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Lung, Mice, Mitochondria, Oxidation-Reduction, RAW 264.7 Cells, Superoxides, Temperature
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The accurate and specific detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different cellular and tissue compartments is essential to the study of redox-regulated signaling in biological settings. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) is the only direct method to assess free radicals unambiguously. Its advantage is that it detects physiologic levels of specific species with a high specificity, but it does require specialized technology, careful sample preparation, and appropriate controls to ensure accurate interpretation of the data. Cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes react selectively with superoxide or other radicals to generate a nitroxide signal that can be quantified by EPR spectroscopy. Cell-permeable spin probes and spin probes designed to accumulate rapidly in the mitochondria allow for the determination of superoxide concentration in different cellular compartments. In cultured cells, the use of cell permeable 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH) along with and without cell-impermeable superoxide dismutase (SOD) pretreatment, or use of cell-permeable PEG-SOD, allows for the differentiation of extracellular from cytosolic superoxide. The mitochondrial 1-hydroxy-4-[2-triphenylphosphonio)-acetamido]-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine,1-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-[2-(triphenylphosphonio)acetamido] piperidinium dichloride (mito-TEMPO-H) allows for measurement of mitochondrial ROS (predominantly superoxide). Spin probes and EPR spectroscopy can also be applied to in vivo models. Superoxide can be detected in extracellular fluids such as blood and alveolar fluid, as well as tissues such as lung tissue. Several methods are presented to process and store tissue for EPR measurements and deliver intravenous 1-hydroxy-3-carboxy-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CPH) spin probe in vivo. While measurements can be performed at room temperature, samples obtained from in vitro and in vivo models can also be stored at -80 °C and analyzed by EPR at 77 K. The samples can be stored in specialized tubing stable at -80 °C and run at 77 K to enable a practical, efficient, and reproducible method that facilitates storing and transferring samples.
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14 MeSH Terms
Antioxidants prevent inflammation and preserve the optic projection and visual function in experimental neurotrauma.
Bernardo-Colón A, Vest V, Clark A, Cooper ML, Calkins DJ, Harrison FE, Rex TS
(2018) Cell Death Dis 9: 1097
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antioxidants, Ascorbic Acid, Axons, Diet, Ketogenic, Disease Models, Animal, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Inflammasomes, Inflammation, Interleukin-1alpha, Interleukin-1beta, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Optic Nerve Injuries, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Retina, Superoxides, Vitamin E
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
We investigated the role of oxidative stress and the inflammasome in trauma-induced axon degeneration and vision loss using a mouse model. The left eyes of male mice were exposed to over-pressure air waves. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice were fed normal, high-vitamin-E (VitE), ketogenic or ketogenic-control diets. Mice lacking the ability to produce vitamin C (VitC) were maintained on a low-VitC diet. Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) and retinal superoxide levels were measured in vivo. Tissue was collected for biochemical and histological analysis. Injury increased retinal superoxide, decreased SOD2, and increased cleaved caspase-1, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-18 levels. Low-VitC exacerbated the changes and the high-VitE diet mitigated them, suggesting that oxidative stress led to the increase in IL-1α and activation of the inflammasome. The injury caused loss of nearly 50% of optic nerve axons at 2 weeks and astrocyte hypertrophy in mice on normal diet, both of which were prevented by the high-VitE diet. The VEP amplitude was decreased after injury in both control-diet and low-VitC mice, but not in the high-VitE-diet mice. The ketogenic diet also prevented the increase in superoxide levels and IL-1α, but had no effect on IL-1β. Despite this, the ketogenic diet preserved optic nerve axons, prevented astrocyte hypertrophy, and preserved the VEP amplitude. These data suggest that oxidative stress induces priming and activation of the inflammasome pathway after neurotrauma of the visual system. Further, blocking the activation of the inflammasome pathway may be an effective post-injury intervention.
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20 MeSH Terms
Oxidative stress increases M1dG, a major peroxidation-derived DNA adduct, in mitochondrial DNA.
Wauchope OR, Mitchener MM, Beavers WN, Galligan JJ, Camarillo JM, Sanders WD, Kingsley PJ, Shim HN, Blackwell T, Luong T, deCaestecker M, Fessel JP, Marnett LJ
(2018) Nucleic Acids Res 46: 3458-3467
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, DNA Adducts, DNA, Mitochondrial, Electron Transport, Endothelial Cells, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Lipid Peroxidation, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mitochondria, Mutagenesis, Oxidants, Oxidative Stress, Purine Nucleosides, Reactive Oxygen Species, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in mitochondria during electron transport and energy generation. Elevated levels of ROS lead to increased amounts of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. We report that levels of M1dG, a major endogenous peroxidation-derived DNA adduct, are 50-100-fold higher in mtDNA than in nuclear DNA in several different human cell lines. Treatment of cells with agents that either increase or decrease mitochondrial superoxide levels leads to increased or decreased levels of M1dG in mtDNA, respectively. Sequence analysis of adducted mtDNA suggests that M1dG residues are randomly distributed throughout the mitochondrial genome. Basal levels of M1dG in mtDNA from pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) from transgenic bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 mutant mice (BMPR2R899X) (four adducts per 106 dG) are twice as high as adduct levels in wild-type cells. A similar increase was observed in mtDNA from heterozygous null (BMPR2+/-) compared to wild-type PMVECs. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is observed in the presence of BMPR2 signaling disruptions, which are also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant injury to endothelial tissue. Persistence of M1dG adducts in mtDNA could have implications for mutagenesis and mitochondrial gene expression, thereby contributing to the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in diseases.
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19 MeSH Terms
Cellular accumulation and antioxidant activity of acetoxymethoxycarbonyl pyrrolidine nitroxides.
Dikalov SI, Dikalova AE, Morozov DA, Kirilyuk IA
(2018) Free Radic Res 52: 339-350
MeSH Terms: Antioxidants, Cyclic N-Oxides, Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy, Mitochondria, Nitrogen Oxides
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Nitroxides are widely used in biology as antioxidants, spin labels, functional spin probes for pH, oxygen and thiol levels, and tissue redox status imaging using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR); however, biological applications of nitroxides is hindered by fast bioreduction to EPR-silent hydroxylamines and rapid clearance. In this work, we have studied pyrrolidine nitroxides with acetoxymethoxycarbonyl groups which can undergo hydrolysis by cellular esterases to hydrophilic carboxylate derivatives resistant to bioreduction. Nitroxides containing acetoxymethoxycarbonyl groups were rapidly absorbed by cells from the media, 3,4-bis-(acetoxymethoxycarbonyl)-proxyl (DCP-AM2) and 3-(2-(bis(2-(acetoxymethoxy)-2-oxoethyl)amino)acetamido)-proxyl (DCAP-AM2) showing the strongest EPR signal of the cellular fraction. Remarkably, the EPR parameters of 3,4-dicarboxy-proxyl (DCP) and its mono- and di-acetoxymethyl esters are different, and consequent intracellular hydrolysis of acetoxymethoxycarbonyl groups in DCP-AM2 can be followed by EPR. To elucidate intracellular location of the resultant DCP, the mitochondrial fraction has been isolated. EPR measurements showed that mitochondria were the main place where DCP was finally accumulated. TEMPO derivatives showed expectedly much faster decay of EPR signal in the cellular fraction, compared to pyrrolidine nitroxides. It was found that supplementation of endothelial cells with 50 nM of DCP-AM2 completely normalised the mitochondrial superoxide level. Moreover, administration of DCP-AM2 to mice (1.4 mg/kg/day) resulted in substantial nitroxide accumulation in the tissues and significantly reduced hypertension. We found that hydroxylamine derivatives of dicarboxyproxyl nitroxide DCP-AM-H can be used for the detection of superoxide in vivo in angiotensin II model of hypertension. Infusion of DCP-AM-H in mice leads to accumulation of persistent EPR signal of nitroxide in the blood and vascular tissue in angiotensin II-infused wild-type but not in SOD2 overexpressing mice. Our data demonstrate that acetoxymethoxycarbonyl group containing nitroxides accumulate in mitochondria and demonstrate site-specific antioxidant activity.
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MeSH Terms
Dendritic Cell Amiloride-Sensitive Channels Mediate Sodium-Induced Inflammation and Hypertension.
Barbaro NR, Foss JD, Kryshtal DO, Tsyba N, Kumaresan S, Xiao L, Mernaugh RL, Itani HA, Loperena R, Chen W, Dikalov S, Titze JM, Knollmann BC, Harrison DG, Kirabo A
(2017) Cell Rep 21: 1009-1020
MeSH Terms: Amiloride, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Cytokines, Dendritic Cells, Epithelial Sodium Channel Blockers, Epithelial Sodium Channels, Hypertension, Inflammation, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, NADPH Oxidases, Oxidative Stress, Prostaglandins E, Protein Kinase C, Sodium, Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 1, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added December 27, 2017
Sodium accumulates in the interstitium and promotes inflammation through poorly defined mechanisms. We describe a pathway by which sodium enters dendritic cells (DCs) through amiloride-sensitive channels including the alpha and gamma subunits of the epithelial sodium channel and the sodium hydrogen exchanger 1. This leads to calcium influx via the sodium calcium exchanger, activation of protein kinase C (PKC), phosphorylation of p47, and association of p47 with gp91. The assembled NADPH oxidase produces superoxide with subsequent formation of immunogenic isolevuglandin (IsoLG)-protein adducts. DCs activated by excess sodium produce increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and promote T cell production of cytokines IL-17A and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). When adoptively transferred into naive mice, these DCs prime hypertension in response to a sub-pressor dose of angiotensin II. These findings provide a mechanistic link between salt, inflammation, and hypertension involving increased oxidative stress and IsoLG production in DCs.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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19 MeSH Terms
LRRC8A channels support TNFα-induced superoxide production by Nox1 which is required for receptor endocytosis.
Choi H, Ettinger N, Rohrbough J, Dikalova A, Nguyen HN, Lamb FS
(2016) Free Radic Biol Med 101: 413-423
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Cyclopentanes, Endocytosis, Gene Expression Regulation, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Indans, JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Membrane Proteins, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, NADPH Oxidase 1, NF-kappa B, Phosphorylation, Protein Subunits, RNA, Small Interfering, Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Type I, Signal Transduction, Superoxide Dismutase, Superoxides, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Leucine Rich Repeat Containing 8A (LRRC8A) is a required component of volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs). In vascular smooth muscle cells, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) activates VRAC via type 1 TNFα receptors (TNFR1), and this requires superoxide (O) production by NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1). VRAC inhibitors suppress the inflammatory response to TNFα by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that LRRC8A directly supports Nox1 activity, providing a link between VRAC current and inflammatory signaling. VRAC inhibition by 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentylindan-1-on-5-yl) oxobutyric acid (DCPIB) impaired NF-κB activation by TNFα. LRRC8A siRNA reduced the magnitude of VRAC and inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activation, iNOS and VCAM expression, and proliferation of VSMCs. Signaling steps disrupted by both siLRRC8A and DCPIB included; extracellular O production by Nox1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and endocytosis of TNFR1. Extracellular superoxide dismutase, but not catalase, selectively inhibited TNFR1 endocytosis and JNK phosphorylation. Thus, O is the critical extracellular oxidant for TNFR signal transduction. Reducing JNK expression (siJNK) increased extracellular O suggesting that JNK provides important negative feedback regulation to Nox1 at the plasma membrane. LRRC8A co-localized by immunostaining, and co-immunoprecipitated with, both Nox1 and its p22phox subunit. LRRC8A is a component of the Nox1 signaling complex. It is required for extracellular O production, which is in turn essential for TNFR1 endocytosis. These data are the first to provide a molecular mechanism for the potent anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of VRAC inhibition.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Mitochondrial Cyclophilin D in Vascular Oxidative Stress and Hypertension.
Itani HA, Dikalova AE, McMaster WG, Nazarewicz RR, Bikineyeva AT, Harrison DG, Dikalov SI
(2016) Hypertension 67: 1218-27
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Angiotensin II, Animals, Biomarkers, Cells, Cultured, Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid, Cyclophilin D, Cyclophilins, Disease Models, Animal, Endothelium, Vascular, Hypertension, Lactones, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mitochondria, Oxidative Stress, Random Allocation, Spiro Compounds, Superoxides, Vasodilation
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2016
Vascular superoxide (O˙2 (-)) and inflammation contribute to hypertension. The mitochondria are an important source of O˙2 (-); however, the regulation of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) and the antihypertensive potential of targeting the mitochondria remain poorly defined. Angiotensin II and inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 17A and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) significantly contribute to hypertension. We hypothesized that angiotensin II and cytokines co-operatively induce cyclophilin D (CypD)-dependent mitochondrial O˙2 (-) production in hypertension. We tested whether CypD inhibition attenuates endothelial oxidative stress and reduces hypertension. CypD depletion in CypD(-/-) mice prevents overproduction of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) in angiotensin II-infused mice, attenuates hypertension by 20 mm Hg, and improves vascular relaxation compared with wild-type C57Bl/6J mice. Treatment of hypertensive mice with the specific CypD inhibitor Sanglifehrin A reduces blood pressure by 28 mm Hg, inhibits production of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) by 40%, and improves vascular relaxation. Angiotensin II-induced hypertension was associated with CypD redox activation by S-glutathionylation, and expression of the mitochondria-targeted H2O2 scavenger, catalase, abolished CypD S-glutathionylation, prevented stimulation mitochondrial O˙2 (-), and attenuated hypertension. The functional role of cytokine-angiotensin II interplay was confirmed by co-operative stimulation of mitochondrial O˙2 (-) by 3-fold in cultured endothelial cells and impairment of aortic relaxation incubated with combination of angiotensin II, interleukin 17A, and tumor necrosis factor-α which was prevented by CypD depletion or expression of mitochondria-targeted SOD2 and catalase. These data support a novel role of CypD in hypertension and demonstrate that targeting CypD decreases mitochondrial O˙2 (-), improves vascular relaxation, and reduces hypertension.
© 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.
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21 MeSH Terms