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N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an anti-oxidant, does not improve bone mechanical properties in a rat model of progressive chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder.
Allen MR, Wallace J, McNerney E, Nyman J, Avin K, Chen N, Moe S
(2020) PLoS One 15: e0230379
MeSH Terms: Acetylcysteine, Animals, Antioxidants, Caseins, Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Glycation End Products, Advanced, Humans, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Male, Mutation, Nuclear Proteins, Oxidative Stress, Parathyroid Hormone, Rats, Tibia, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added March 25, 2020
Individuals with chronic kidney disease have elevated levels of oxidative stress and are at a significantly higher risk of skeletal fracture. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in bone and compromise mechanical properties, are known to be driven in part by oxidative stress. The goal of this study was to study effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on reducing oxidative stress and improving various bone parameters, most specifically mechanical properties, in an animal model of progressive CKD. Male Cy/+ (CKD) rats and unaffected littermates were untreated (controls) or treated with NAC (80 mg/kg, IP) from 30 to 35 weeks of age. Endpoint measures included serum biochemistries, assessments of systemic oxidative stress, bone morphology, and mechanical properties, and AGE levels in the bone. CKD rats had the expected phenotype that included low kidney function, elevated parathyroid hormone, higher cortical porosity, and compromised mechanical properties. NAC treatment had mixed effects on oxidative stress markers, significantly reducing TBARS (a measure of lipid peroxidation) while not affecting 8-OHdG (a marker of DNA oxidation) levels. AGE levels in the bone were elevated in CKD animals and were reduced with NAC although this did not translate to a benefit in bone mechanical properties. In conclusion, NAC failed to significantly improve bone architecture/geometry/mechanical properties in our rat model of progressive CKD.
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19 MeSH Terms
Cell-free hemoglobin increases inflammation, lung apoptosis, and microvascular permeability in murine polymicrobial sepsis.
Meegan JE, Shaver CM, Putz ND, Jesse JJ, Landstreet SR, Lee HNR, Sidorova TN, McNeil JB, Wynn JL, Cheung-Flynn J, Komalavilas P, Brophy CM, Ware LB, Bastarache JA
(2020) PLoS One 15: e0228727
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Capillary Permeability, Endothelial Cells, Female, Hemoglobins, Humans, Inflammation, Lung, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Oxidative Stress, Sepsis
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Increased endothelial permeability is central to the pathogenesis of sepsis and leads to organ dysfunction and death but the endogenous mechanisms that drive increased endothelial permeability are not completely understood. We previously reported that cell-free hemoglobin (CFH), elevated in 80% of patients with sepsis, increases lung microvascular permeability in an ex vivo human lung model and cultured endothelial cells. In this study, we augmented a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis with elevated circulating CFH to test the hypothesis that CFH increases microvascular endothelial permeability by inducing endothelial apoptosis. Mice were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of cecal slurry with or without a single intravenous injection of CFH. Severity of illness, mortality, systemic and lung inflammation, endothelial injury and dysfunction and lung apoptosis were measured at selected time points. We found that CFH added to CS increased sepsis mortality, plasma inflammatory cytokines as well as lung apoptosis, edema and inflammation without affecting large vessel reactivity or vascular injury marker concentrations. These results suggest that CFH is an endogenous mediator of increased endothelial permeability and apoptosis in sepsis and may be a promising therapeutic target.
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13 MeSH Terms
Interpreting an apoptotic corpse as anti-inflammatory involves a chloride sensing pathway.
Perry JSA, Morioka S, Medina CB, Iker Etchegaray J, Barron B, Raymond MH, Lucas CD, Onengut-Gumuscu S, Delpire E, Ravichandran KS
(2019) Nat Cell Biol 21: 1532-1543
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Biological Transport, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Chlorides, Humans, Inflammation, Jurkat Cells, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Oxidative Stress, Phagocytes, Phagocytosis, Signal Transduction, Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 18, 2020
Apoptotic cell clearance (efferocytosis) elicits an anti-inflammatory response by phagocytes, but the mechanisms that underlie this response are still being defined. Here, we uncover a chloride-sensing signalling pathway that controls both the phagocyte 'appetite' and its anti-inflammatory response. Efferocytosis transcriptionally altered the genes that encode the solute carrier (SLC) proteins SLC12A2 and SLC12A4. Interfering with SLC12A2 expression or function resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic corpse uptake per phagocyte, whereas the loss of SLC12A4 inhibited corpse uptake. In SLC12A2-deficient phagocytes, the canonical anti-inflammatory program was replaced by pro-inflammatory and oxidative-stress-associated gene programs. This 'switch' to pro-inflammatory sensing of apoptotic cells resulted from the disruption of the chloride-sensing pathway (and not due to corpse overload or poor degradation), including the chloride-sensing kinases WNK1, OSR1 and SPAK-which function upstream of SLC12A2-had a similar effect on efferocytosis. Collectively, the WNK1-OSR1-SPAK-SLC12A2/SLC12A4 chloride-sensing pathway and chloride flux in phagocytes are key modifiers of the manner in which phagocytes interpret the engulfed apoptotic corpse.
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Arachidonic Acid Kills Staphylococcus aureus through a Lipid Peroxidation Mechanism.
Beavers WN, Monteith AJ, Amarnath V, Mernaugh RL, Roberts LJ, Chazin WJ, Davies SS, Skaar EP
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents, Arachidonic Acid, Brain, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Resistance, Bacterial, Female, Kidney, Lipid Peroxidation, Lipids, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Microbial Sensitivity Tests, Mutation, Neutrophils, Oxidative Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, Spleen, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Teichoic Acids
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2020
infects every niche of the human host. In response to microbial infection, vertebrates have an arsenal of antimicrobial compounds that inhibit bacterial growth or kill bacterial cells. One class of antimicrobial compounds consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are highly abundant in eukaryotes and encountered by at the host-pathogen interface. Arachidonic acid (AA) is one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in vertebrates and is released in large amounts during the oxidative burst. Most of the released AA is converted to bioactive signaling molecules, but, independently of its role in inflammatory signaling, AA is toxic to Here, we report that AA kills through a lipid peroxidation mechanism whereby AA is oxidized to reactive electrophiles that modify macromolecules, eliciting toxicity. This process is rescued by cotreatment with antioxidants as well as in a strain genetically inactivated for (USA300 mutant) that produces lower levels of reactive oxygen species. However, resistance to AA stress in the USA300 mutant comes at a cost, making the mutant more susceptible to β-lactam antibiotics and attenuated for pathogenesis in a murine infection model compared to the parental methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain, indicating that resistance to AA toxicity increases susceptibility to other stressors encountered during infection. This report defines the mechanism by which AA is toxic to and identifies lipid peroxidation as a pathway that can be modulated for the development of future therapeutics to treat infections. Despite the ability of the human immune system to generate a plethora of molecules to control infections, is among the pathogens with the greatest impact on human health. One class of host molecules toxic to consists of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Here, we investigated the antibacterial properties of arachidonic acid, one of the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids in humans, and discovered that the mechanism of toxicity against proceeds through lipid peroxidation. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which the immune system kills , and by which avoids host killing, will enable the optimal design of therapeutics that complement the ability of the vertebrate immune response to eliminate infections.
Copyright © 2019 Beavers et al.
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21 MeSH Terms
Sex differences in anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity: the benefits of estrogens.
Cadeddu Dessalvi C, Pepe A, Penna C, Gimelli A, Madonna R, Mele D, Monte I, Novo G, Nugara C, Zito C, Moslehi JJ, de Boer RA, Lyon AR, Tocchetti CG, Mercuro G
(2019) Heart Fail Rev 24: 915-925
MeSH Terms: Anthracyclines, Biomarkers, Cardiotonic Agents, Cardiotoxicity, Echocardiography, Female, Gonadal Steroid Hormones, Heart, Heart Failure, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Male, Mitochondria, Nuclear Medicine, Oxidative Stress, Prognosis, Reperfusion Injury, Risk Factors, Sex Characteristics
Show Abstract · Added November 12, 2019
Anthracyclines are the cornerstone for many oncologic treatments, but their cardiotoxicity has been recognized for several decades. Female subjects, especially before puberty and adolescence, or after menopause, seem to be more at increased risk, with the prognostic impact of this sex issue being less consistent compared to other cardiovascular risk factors. Several studies imply that sex differences could depend on the lack of the protective effect of sex hormones against the anthracycline-initiated damage in cardiac cells, or on differential mitochondria-related oxidative gene expression. This is also reflected by the results obtained with different diagnostic methods, such as cardiovascular biomarkers and imaging techniques (echocardiography, magnetic resonance, and nuclear medicine) in the diagnosis and monitoring of cardiotoxicity, confirming that sex differences exist. The same is true about protective strategies from anthracycline cardiotoxicity. Indeed, first studied to withstand oxidative damage in response to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, cardioprotection has different outcomes in men and women. A number of studies assessed the differences in I/R response between male and female hearts, with oxidative stress and apoptosis being shared mechanisms between the I/R and anthracyclines heart damage. Sex hormones can modulate these mechanisms, thus confirming their importance in the pathophysiology in cardioprotection not only from the ischemia/reperfusion damage, but also from anthracyclines, fueling further cardio-oncologic research on the topic.
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19 MeSH Terms
Deconvoluting Stress-Responsive Proteostasis Signaling Pathways for Pharmacologic Activation Using Targeted RNA Sequencing.
Grandjean JMD, Plate L, Morimoto RI, Bollong MJ, Powers ET, Wiseman RL
(2019) ACS Chem Biol 14: 784-795
MeSH Terms: Animals, HEK293 Cells, Heat Shock Transcription Factors, Humans, Mice, NF-E2 Transcription Factor, Oxidative Stress, Proteostasis, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Signal Transduction, Unfolded Protein Response
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Cellular proteostasis is maintained by stress-responsive signaling pathways such as the heat shock response (HSR), the oxidative stress response (OSR), and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Activation of these pathways results in the transcriptional upregulation of select subsets of stress-responsive genes that restore proteostasis and adapt cellular physiology to promote recovery following various types of acute insult. The capacity for these pathways to regulate cellular proteostasis makes them attractive therapeutic targets for correcting proteostasis defects associated with diverse diseases. High-throughput screening (HTS) using cell-based reporter assays is highly effective for identifying putative activators of stress-responsive signaling pathways. However, the development of these compounds is hampered by the lack of medium-throughput assays to define compound potency and selectivity for a given pathway. Here, we describe a targeted RNA sequencing (RNAseq) assay that allows cost-effective, medium-throughput screening of stress-responsive signaling pathway activation. We demonstrate that this assay allows deconvolution of stress-responsive signaling activated by chemical genetic or pharmacologic agents. Furthermore, we use this assay to define the selectivity of putative OSR and HSR activating compounds previously identified by HTS. Our results demonstrate the potential for integrating this adaptable targeted RNAseq assay into screening programs focused on developing pharmacologic activators of stress-responsive signaling pathways.
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Manganese Detoxification by MntE Is Critical for Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Virulence of .
Grunenwald CM, Choby JE, Juttukonda LJ, Beavers WN, Weiss A, Torres VJ, Skaar EP
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cation Transport Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial, Homeostasis, Iron, Manganese, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Microbial Viability, Oxidative Stress, Staphylococcal Infections, Staphylococcus aureus, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient critical for the pathogenesis of , a significant cause of human morbidity and mortality. Paradoxically, excess Mn is toxic; therefore, maintenance of intracellular Mn homeostasis is required for survival. Here we describe a Mn exporter in , MntE, which is a member of the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) protein family and conserved among Gram-positive pathogens. Upregulation of transcription in response to excess Mn is dependent on the presence of MntR, a transcriptional repressor of the Mn uptake system. Inactivation of or leads to reduced growth in media supplemented with Mn, demonstrating MntE is required for detoxification of excess Mn. Inactivation of results in elevated levels of intracellular Mn, but reduced intracellular iron (Fe) levels, supporting the hypothesis that MntE functions as a Mn efflux pump and Mn efflux influences Fe homeostasis. Strains inactivated for are more sensitive to the oxidants NaOCl and paraquat, indicating Mn homeostasis is critical for resisting oxidative stress. Furthermore, and are required for full virulence of during infection, suggesting experiences Mn toxicity Combined, these data support a model in which MntR controls Mn homeostasis by balancing transcriptional repression of and induction of , both of which are critical for pathogenesis. Thus, Mn efflux contributes to bacterial survival and virulence during infection, establishing MntE as a potential antimicrobial target and expanding our understanding of Mn homeostasis. Manganese (Mn) is generally viewed as a critical nutrient that is beneficial to pathogenic bacteria due to its function as an enzymatic cofactor and its capability of acting as an antioxidant; yet paradoxically, high concentrations of this transition metal can be toxic. In this work, we demonstrate utilizes the cation diffusion facilitator (CDF) family protein MntE to alleviate Mn toxicity through efflux of excess Mn. Inactivation of leads to a significant reduction in resistance to oxidative stress and mediated mortality within a mouse model of systemic infection. These results highlight the importance of MntE-mediated Mn detoxification in intracellular Mn homeostasis, resistance to oxidative stress, and virulence. Therefore, this establishes MntE as a potential target for development of anti- therapeutics.
Copyright © 2019 Grunenwald et al.
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15 MeSH Terms
α-Difluoromethylornithine reduces gastric carcinogenesis by causing mutations in .
Sierra JC, Suarez G, Piazuelo MB, Luis PB, Baker DR, Romero-Gallo J, Barry DP, Schneider C, Morgan DR, Peek RM, Gobert AP, Wilson KT
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 5077-5085
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Carcinogenesis, DNA Damage, Eflornithine, Gene Deletion, Gene Rearrangement, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter pylori, Male, Mutation, Oxidative Stress, RNA, Messenger, Stomach Neoplasms, Virulence
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2019
Infection by is the primary cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The most potent virulence factor is cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), which is translocated by a type 4 secretion system (T4SS) into gastric epithelial cells and activates oncogenic signaling pathways. The gene encodes for a key component of the T4SS and can undergo gene rearrangements. We have shown that the cancer chemopreventive agent α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), known to inhibit the enzyme ornithine decarboxylase, reduces -mediated gastric cancer incidence in Mongolian gerbils. In the present study, we questioned whether DFMO might directly affect pathogenicity. We show that output strains isolated from gerbils treated with DFMO exhibit reduced ability to translocate CagA in gastric epithelial cells. Further, we frequently detected genomic modifications in the middle repeat region of the gene of output strains from DFMO-treated animals, which were associated with alterations in the CagY protein. Gerbils did not develop carcinoma when infected with a DFMO output strain containing rearranged or the parental strain in which the wild-type was replaced by with DFMO-induced rearrangements. Lastly, we demonstrate that in vitro treatment of by DFMO induces oxidative DNA damage, expression of the DNA repair enzyme MutS2, and mutations in , demonstrating that DFMO directly affects genomic stability. Deletion of abrogated the ability of DFMO to induce rearrangements directly. In conclusion, DFMO-induced oxidative stress in leads to genomic alterations and attenuates virulence.
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15 MeSH Terms
Crosstalk Between Mitochondrial Hyperacetylation and Oxidative Stress in Vascular Dysfunction and Hypertension.
Dikalov SI, Dikalova AE
(2019) Antioxid Redox Signal 31: 710-721
MeSH Terms: Acetylation, Animals, Humans, Hypertension, Mitochondria, Oxidative Stress, Vascular Diseases
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Vascular dysfunction plays a key role in the development of arteriosclerosis, heart disease, and hypertension, which causes one-third of deaths worldwide. Vascular oxidative stress and metabolic disorders contribute to vascular dysfunction, leading to impaired vasorelaxation, vascular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and aortic stiffening. Mitochondria are critical in the regulation of metabolic and antioxidant functions; therefore, mitochondria-targeted treatments could be beneficial. Vascular dysfunction is crucial in hypertension pathophysiology and exhibits bidirectional relationship. Metabolic disorders and oxidative stress contribute to the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction and hypertension, which are associated with mitochondrial impairment and hyperacetylation. Mitochondrial deacetylase Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) is critical in the regulation of metabolic and antioxidant functions. Clinical studies show that cardiovascular disease risk factors reduce Sirt3 level and Sirt3 declines with age, paralleling the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. An imbalance between mitochondrial acetylation and reduced Sirt3 activity contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. We propose that mitochondrial hyperacetylation drives a vicious cycle between metabolic disorders and mitochondrial oxidative stress, promoting vascular dysfunction and hypertension. The mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction are still obscure in human hypertension. Mitochondrial hyperacetylation and oxidative stress contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction; however, regulation of mitochondrial acetylation, the role of GCN5L1 (acetyl-CoA-binding protein promoting acetyltransferase protein acetylation) acetyltransferase, Sirt3 deacetylase, and acetylation of specific proteins require further investigations. There is an urgent need to define molecular mechanisms and the pathophysiological role of mitochondrial hyperacetylation, identify novel pharmacological targets, and develop therapeutic approaches to reduce this phenomenon.
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7 MeSH Terms
Tobacco smoking induces cardiovascular mitochondrial oxidative stress, promotes endothelial dysfunction, and enhances hypertension.
Dikalov S, Itani H, Richmond B, Vergeade A, Rahman SMJ, Boutaud O, Blackwell T, Massion PP, Harrison DG, Dikalova A
(2019) Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 316: H639-H646
MeSH Terms: Angiotensin II, Animals, Blood Pressure, Calcium Channels, Endothelium, Vascular, Hydrogen Peroxide, Hypertension, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Mitochondria, Heart, Oxidative Stress, Superoxide Dismutase, TRPV Cation Channels, Tobacco Smoking, Vasoconstrictor Agents
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Tobacco smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and hypertension. It is associated with the oxidative stress and induces metabolic reprogramming, altering mitochondrial function. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke induces cardiovascular mitochondrial oxidative stress, which contributes to endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To test this hypothesis, we studied whether the scavenging of mitochondrial HO in transgenic mice expressing mitochondria-targeted catalase (mCAT) attenuates the development of cigarette smoke/angiotensin II-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and hypertension compared with wild-type mice. Two weeks of exposure of wild-type mice with cigarette smoke increased systolic blood pressure by 17 mmHg, which was similar to the effect of a subpresssor dose of angiotensin II (0.2 mg·kg·day), leading to a moderate increase to the prehypertensive level. Cigarette smoke exposure and a low dose of angiotensin II cooperatively induced severe hypertension in wild-type mice, but the scavenging of mitochondrial HO in mCAT mice completely prevented the development of hypertension. Cigarette smoke and angiotensin II cooperatively induced oxidation of cardiolipin (a specific biomarker of mitochondrial oxidative stress) in wild-type mice, which was abolished in mCAT mice. Cigarette smoke and angiotensin II impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation and induced superoxide overproduction, which was diminished in mCAT mice. To mimic the tobacco smoke exposure, we used cigarette smoke condensate, which induced mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and reduced endothelial nitric oxide (a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension). Western blot experiments indicated that tobacco smoke and angiotensin II reduce the mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin-3 level and cause hyperacetylation of a key mitochondrial antioxidant, SOD2, which promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This work demonstrates tobacco smoking-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress, which contributes to endothelial dysfunction and development of hypertension. We suggest that the targeting of mitochondrial oxidative stress can be beneficial for treatment of pathological conditions associated with tobacco smoking, such as endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases.
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16 MeSH Terms