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Comparative effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea.
Boyd SB, Walters AS, Song Y, Wang L
(2013) J Oral Maxillofac Surg 71: 743-51
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Mandibular Advancement, Middle Aged, Osteotomy, Le Fort, Osteotomy, Sagittal Split Ramus, Oxygen, Palate, Soft, Pharynx, Polysomnography, Respiratory Function Tests, Retrospective Studies, Sleep, Sleep Apnea, Obstructive, Statistics, Nonparametric, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 10, 2014
PURPOSE - To directly compare the clinical effectiveness of maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP)--performed alone and in combination--for the treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).
PATIENTS AND METHODS - The investigators designed and implemented a retrospective cohort study composed of patients with moderate to severe OSA (baseline AHI >15). The predictor variable was operative treatment and included MMA, UPPP, and UPPP followed by MMA (UPPP/MMA). The primary outcome variable was the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) measured preoperatively and 3 months to 6 months postoperatively. Other variables were grouped into the following categories: demographic, respiratory, and sleep parameters. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed.
RESULTS - The sample was composed of 106 patients grouped as follows: MMA (n = 37), UPPP (n = 34), and UPPP/MMA (n = 35) for treatment of OSA. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups for the study variables at baseline, except for AHI. Surgical treatment resulted in a significant decrease in AHI in each group: MMA (baseline AHI, 56.3 ± 22.6 vs AHI after MMA, 11.4 ± 9.8; P < .0001), UPPP/MMA (baseline AHI, 55.7 ± 49.2 vs AHI after UPPP/MMA, 11.6 ± 10.7; P < .0001), and UPPP (baseline AHI, 41.8 ± 28.0 vs AHI after UPPP, 30.1 ± 27.5; P = .0057). After adjusting for differences in baseline AHI, the estimated mean change in AHI was significantly larger for MMA compared with UPPP (MMA AHI, -40.5 vs UPPP AHI, -19.4; P = < .0001). UPPP/MMA was no more effective than MMA (P = .684).
CONCLUSION - The results of this study suggest that MMA should be the surgical treatment option of choice for most patients with moderate to severe OSA who are unable to adequately adhere to CPAP.
Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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