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Results: 1 to 9 of 9

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Exploring Proxy Measures of Mutuality for Strategic Partnership Development: A Case Study.
Mayo-Gamble TL, Barnes PA, Sherwood-Laughlin CM, Reece M, DeWeese S, Kennedy CW, Valenta MA
(2017) Health Promot Pract 18: 598-606
MeSH Terms: Capacity Building, Cooperative Behavior, Education, Public Health Professional, Hospital Administration, Humans, Interinstitutional Relations, Organizational Case Studies, Organizational Objectives, Policy
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
Partnerships between academic and clinical-based health organizations are becoming increasingly important in improving health outcomes. Mutuality is recognized as a vital component of these partnerships. If partnerships are to achieve mutuality, there is a need to define what it means to partnering organizations. Few studies have described the elements contributing to mutuality, particularly in new relationships between academic and clinical partners. This study seeks to identify how mutuality is expressed and to explore potential proxy measures of mutuality for an alliance consisting of a hospital system and a School of Public Health. Key informant interviews were conducted with faculty and hospital representatives serving on the partnership steering committee. Key informants were asked about perceived events that led to the development of the Alliance; perceived goals, expectations, and outcomes; and current/future roles with the Alliance. Four proxy measures of mutuality for an academic-clinical partnership were identified: policy directives, community beneficence, procurement of human capital, and partnership longevity. Findings can inform the development of tools for assisting in strengthening relationships and ensuring stakeholders' interests align with the mission and goal of the partnership by operationalizing elements necessary to evaluate the progress of the partnership.
0 Communities
1 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
A multi-institution evaluation of clinical profile anonymization.
Heatherly R, Rasmussen LV, Peissig PL, Pacheco JA, Harris P, Denny JC, Malin BA
(2016) J Am Med Inform Assoc 23: e131-7
MeSH Terms: Confidentiality, Data Anonymization, Electronic Health Records, Humans, Hypothyroidism, Information Dissemination, International Classification of Diseases, Organizational Case Studies
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE - There is an increasing desire to share de-identified electronic health records (EHRs) for secondary uses, but there are concerns that clinical terms can be exploited to compromise patient identities. Anonymization algorithms mitigate such threats while enabling novel discoveries, but their evaluation has been limited to single institutions. Here, we study how an existing clinical profile anonymization fares at multiple medical centers.
METHODS - We apply a state-of-the-artk-anonymization algorithm, withkset to the standard value 5, to the International Classification of Disease, ninth edition codes for patients in a hypothyroidism association study at three medical centers: Marshfield Clinic, Northwestern University, and Vanderbilt University. We assess utility when anonymizing at three population levels: all patients in 1) the EHR system; 2) the biorepository; and 3) a hypothyroidism study. We evaluate utility using 1) changes to the number included in the dataset, 2) number of codes included, and 3) regions generalization and suppression were required.
RESULTS - Our findings yield several notable results. First, we show that anonymizing in the context of the entire EHR yields a significantly greater quantity of data by reducing the amount of generalized regions from ∼15% to ∼0.5%. Second, ∼70% of codes that needed generalization only generalized two or three codes in the largest anonymization.
CONCLUSIONS - Sharing large volumes of clinical data in support of phenome-wide association studies is possible while safeguarding privacy to the underlying individuals.
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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8 MeSH Terms
Use of Six Sigma for eliminating missed opportunities for prevention services.
Gittner LS, Husaini BA, Hull PC, Emerson JS, Tropez-Sims S, Reece MC, Zoorob R, Levine RS
(2015) J Nurs Care Qual 30: 254-60
MeSH Terms: Ambulatory Care Facilities, Evidence-Based Nursing, Female, Humans, Male, Medical Staff, Minority Groups, Nurse Administrators, Organizational Case Studies, Preventive Health Services, Primary Health Care, Quality Improvement, Total Quality Management
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2017
Delivery of primary care preventative services can be significantly increased utilizing Six Sigma methods. Missed preventative service opportunities were compared in the study clinic with the community clinic in the same practice. The study clinic had 100% preventative services, compared with only 16.3% in the community clinic. Preventative services can be enhanced to Six Sigma quality when the nurse executive and medical staff agree on a single standard of nursing care executed via standing orders.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
The deployment of a tissue request tracking system for the CHTN: a case study in managing change in informatics for biobanking operations.
Edgerton ME, Grizzle WE, Washington MK
(2010) BMC Med Inform Decis Mak 10: 32
MeSH Terms: Biological Specimen Banks, Databases as Topic, Humans, Medical Informatics, Organizational Case Studies, Organizational Innovation, Software
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
BACKGROUND - Managing change has not only been recognized as an important topic in medical informatics, but it has become increasingly important in translational informatics. The move to share data, together with the increasing complexity and volume of the data, has precipitated a transition from locally stored worksheet and flat files to relational data bases with object oriented interfaces for data storage and retrieval. While the transition from simple to complex data structures, mirroring the transition from simple to complex experimental technologies, seems natural, the human factor often fails to be adequately addressed leading to failures in managing change.
METHODS - We describe here a case study in change management applied to an application in translational informatics that touches upon changes in hardware, software, data models, procedures, and terminology standards. We use the classic paper by Riley and Lorenzi to dissect the problems that arose, the solutions that were implemented, and the lessons learned.
RESULTS - The entire project from requirements gathering through completion of migration of the system took three years. Double data entry into the old and new systems persisted for six months. Contributing factors hindering progress and solutions to facilitate managing the change were identified in seven of the areas identified by Riley and Lorenzi: communications, cultural changes in work practice, scope creep, leadership and organizational issues, and training.
CONCLUSIONS - Detailed documentation of the agreed upon requirements for the new system along with ongoing review of the sources of resistance to change as defined by Riley and Lorenzi were the most important steps taken that contributed to the success of the project. Cultural changes in tissue collection mandated by standards requirements introduced by the Cancer Bioinformatics Grid (CaBIG) and excessive reliance on the outgoing system during a lengthy period of dual data entry were the primary sources of resistance to change.
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7 MeSH Terms
Community-based organizational capacity building as a strategy to reduce racial health disparities.
Griffith DM, Allen JO, DeLoney EH, Robinson K, Lewis EY, Campbell B, Morrel-Samuels S, Sparks A, Zimmerman MA, Reischl T
(2010) J Prim Prev 31: 31-9
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Capacity Building, Community Health Services, Community-Institutional Relations, HIV Infections, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Michigan, Needs Assessment, Organizational Case Studies, Primary Prevention
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
One of the biggest challenges facing racial health disparities research is identifying how and where to implement effective, sustainable interventions. Community-based organizations (CBOs) and community-academic partnerships are frequently utilized as vehicles to conduct community health promotion interventions without attending to the viability and sustainability of CBOs or capacity inequities among partners. Utilizing organizational empowerment theory, this paper describes an intervention designed to increase the capacity of CBOs and community-academic partnerships to implement strategies to improve community health. The Capacity Building project illustrates how capacity building interventions can help to identify community health needs, promote community empowerment, and reduce health disparities.
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11 MeSH Terms
Social, organizational, and contextual characteristics of clinical decision support systems for intensive insulin therapy: a literature review and case study.
Campion TR, Waitman LR, May AK, Ozdas A, Lorenzi NM, Gadd CS
(2010) Int J Med Inform 79: 31-43
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Attitude to Computers, Decision Making, Organizational, Decision Support Systems, Clinical, Hospitals, University, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin, Intensive Care Units, Interprofessional Relations, Organizational Case Studies, Organizational Innovation, Tennessee, User-Computer Interface
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
INTRODUCTION - Evaluations of computerized clinical decision support systems (CDSS) typically focus on clinical performance changes and do not include social, organizational, and contextual characteristics explaining use and effectiveness. Studies of CDSS for intensive insulin therapy (IIT) are no exception, and the literature lacks an understanding of effective computer-based IIT implementation and operation.
RESULTS - This paper presents (1) a literature review of computer-based IIT evaluations through the lens of institutional theory, a discipline from sociology and organization studies, to demonstrate the inconsistent reporting of workflow and care process execution and (2) a single-site case study to illustrate how computer-based IIT requires substantial organizational change and creates additional complexity with unintended consequences including error.
DISCUSSION - Computer-based IIT requires organizational commitment and attention to site-specific technology, workflow, and care processes to achieve intensive insulin therapy goals. The complex interaction between clinicians, blood glucose testing devices, and CDSS may contribute to workflow inefficiency and error. Evaluations rarely focus on the perspective of nurses, the primary users of computer-based IIT whose knowledge can potentially lead to process and care improvements.
CONCLUSION - This paper addresses a gap in the literature concerning the social, organizational, and contextual characteristics of CDSS in general and for intensive insulin therapy specifically. Additionally, this paper identifies areas for future research to define optimal computer-based IIT process execution: the frequency and effect of manual data entry error of blood glucose values, the frequency and effect of nurse overrides of CDSS insulin dosing recommendations, and comprehensive ethnographic study of CDSS for IIT.
Copyright (c) 2009. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
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14 MeSH Terms
Considering organizational factors in addressing health care disparities: two case examples.
Griffith DM, Yonas M, Mason M, Havens BE
(2010) Health Promot Pract 11: 367-76
MeSH Terms: Breast Neoplasms, Delivery of Health Care, Female, Health Promotion, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Male, Organizational Case Studies, Organizational Culture, Organizational Innovation, Prejudice, Program Evaluation, Public Health Administration, Quality of Health Care, Rural Health Services, Southeastern United States, Urban Health Services
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Policy makers and practitioners have yet to successfully understand and eliminate persistent racial differences in health care quality. Interventions to address these racial health care disparities have largely focused on increasing cultural awareness and sensitivity, promoting culturally competent care, and increasing providers' adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Although these strategies have improved some proximal factors associated with service provision, they have not had a strong impact on racial health care disparities. Interventions to date have had limited impact on racial differences in health care quality, in part, because they have not adequately considered or addressed organizational and institutional factors. In this article, we describe an emerging intervention strategy to reduce health care disparities called dismantling (undoing) racism and how it has been adapted to a rural public health department and an urban medical system. These examples illustrate the importance of adapting interventions to the organizational and institutional context and have important implications for practitioners and policy makers.
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17 MeSH Terms
Organizational empowerment in community mobilization to address youth violence.
Griffith DM, Allen JO, Zimmerman MA, Morrel-Samuels S, Reischl TM, Cohen SE, Campbell KA
(2008) Am J Prev Med 34: S89-99
MeSH Terms: Community Networks, Cooperative Behavior, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Juvenile Delinquency, Michigan, Models, Theoretical, Organizational Case Studies, Power (Psychology), Program Development, Violence
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Community mobilization efforts to address youth violence are often disconnected, uncoordinated, and lacking adequate resources. An organizational empowerment theory for community partnerships provides a useful framework for organizing and evaluating a coalition's community mobilization efforts and benefits for individual organizations, partnerships, and communities. Based on a qualitative analysis of steering committee interviews and other primary data, the results of a case study suggest that the intraorganizational infrastructure; interorganizational membership practices and networking; and extraorganizational research, training, and organizing activities facilitate the community mobilization efforts of the Youth Violence Prevention Center in Flint, Michigan. The organizational empowerment framework, and its focus on organizational structures and processes, illustrates the importance of recognizing and incorporating the organizational systems and structures that provide the foundation on which a community mobilization effort may build. This framework also highlights how organizational structures and processes are central components of multilevel strategies for organizing and mobilizing community efforts to address youth violence.
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Synthesis of informatics literature to support institutional policy statement development.
Koonce TY, Sathe NA, Giuse DA, Jirjis J
(2008) J Med Libr Assoc 96: 3-11
MeSH Terms: Humans, Information Storage and Retrieval, Libraries, Hospital, Medical Records Systems, Computerized, Medical Subject Headings, Organizational Case Studies, Organizational Policy
Added April 16, 2013
0 Communities
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7 MeSH Terms