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Structural basis for influenza virus NS1 protein block of mRNA nuclear export.
Zhang K, Xie Y, Muñoz-Moreno R, Wang J, Zhang L, Esparza M, García-Sastre A, Fontoura BMA, Ren Y
(2019) Nat Microbiol 4: 1671-1679
MeSH Terms: A549 Cells, Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Binding Sites, Cell Nucleus, Cells, Cultured, Crystallography, X-Ray, Humans, Influenza A virus, Influenza, Human, Models, Molecular, Multiprotein Complexes, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Protein Binding, RNA, Messenger, RNA-Binding Proteins, Viral Nonstructural Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Influenza viruses antagonize key immune defence mechanisms via the virulence factor non-structural protein 1 (NS1). A key mechanism of virulence by NS1 is blocking nuclear export of host messenger RNAs, including those encoding immune factors; however, the direct cellular target of NS1 and the mechanism of host mRNA export inhibition are not known. Here, we identify the target of NS1 as the mRNA export receptor complex, nuclear RNA export factor 1-nuclear transport factor 2-related export protein 1 (NXF1-NXT1), which is the principal receptor mediating docking and translocation of mRNAs through the nuclear pore complex via interactions with nucleoporins. We determined the crystal structure of NS1 in complex with NXF1-NXT1 at 3.8 Å resolution. The structure reveals that NS1 prevents binding of NXF1-NXT1 to nucleoporins, thereby inhibiting mRNA export through the nuclear pore complex into the cytoplasm for translation. We demonstrate that a mutant influenza virus deficient in binding NXF1-NXT1 does not block host mRNA export and is attenuated. This attenuation is marked by the release of mRNAs encoding immune factors from the nucleus. In sum, our study uncovers the molecular basis of a major nuclear function of influenza NS1 protein that causes potent blockage of host gene expression and contributes to inhibition of host immunity.
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Nup42 and IP coordinate Gle1 stimulation of Dbp5/DDX19B for mRNA export in yeast and human cells.
Adams RL, Mason AC, Glass L, Aditi , Wente SR
(2017) Traffic 18: 776-790
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Humans, Nuclear Pore, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Phytic Acid, RNA, Messenger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2018
The mRNA lifecycle is driven through spatiotemporal changes in the protein composition of mRNA particles (mRNPs) that are triggered by RNA-dependent DEAD-box protein (Dbp) ATPases. As mRNPs exit the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this remodeling occurs through activation of Dbp5 by inositol hexakisphosphate (IP )-bound Gle1. At the NPC, Gle1 also binds Nup42, but Nup42's molecular function is unclear. Here we employ the power of structure-function analysis in S. cerevisiae and human (h) cells, and find that the high-affinity Nup42-Gle1 interaction is integral to Dbp5 (hDDX19B) activation and efficient mRNA export. The Nup42 carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) binds Gle1/hGle1B at an interface distinct from the Gle1-Dbp5/hDDX19B interaction site. A nup42-CTD/gle1-CTD/Dbp5 trimeric complex forms in the presence of IP . Deletion of NUP42 abrogates Gle1-Dbp5 interaction, and disruption of the Nup42 or IP binding interfaces on Gle1/hGle1B leads to defective mRNA export in S. cerevisiae and human cells. In vitro, Nup42-CTD and IP stimulate Gle1/hGle1B activation of Dbp5 and DDX19B recombinant proteins in similar, nonadditive manners, demonstrating complete functional conservation between humans and S. cerevisiae. Together, a highly conserved mechanism governs spatial coordination of mRNP remodeling during export. This has implications for understanding human disease mutations that perturb the Nup42-hGle1B interaction.
© 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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10 MeSH Terms
A role for Gle1, a regulator of DEAD-box RNA helicases, at centrosomes and basal bodies.
Jao LE, Akef A, Wente SR
(2017) Mol Biol Cell 28: 120-127
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Adenosine Triphosphatases, Antigens, Basal Bodies, Centrosome, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Nuclear Pore, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Protein Binding, RNA Transport, RNA, Messenger, RNA-Binding Proteins, Zebrafish Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 14, 2017
Control of organellar assembly and function is critical to eukaryotic homeostasis and survival. Gle1 is a highly conserved regulator of RNA-dependent DEAD-box ATPase proteins, with critical roles in both mRNA export and translation. In addition to its well-defined interaction with nuclear pore complexes, here we find that Gle1 is enriched at the centrosome and basal body. Gle1 assembles into the toroid-shaped pericentriolar material around the mother centriole. Reduced Gle1 levels are correlated with decreased pericentrin localization at the centrosome and microtubule organization defects. Of importance, these alterations in centrosome integrity do not result from loss of mRNA export. Examination of the Kupffer's vesicle in Gle1-depleted zebrafish revealed compromised ciliary beating and developmental defects. We propose that Gle1 assembly into the pericentriolar material positions the DEAD-box protein regulator to function in localized mRNA metabolism required for proper centrosome function.
© 2017 Jao et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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14 MeSH Terms
An amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutation in GLE1 alters the cellular pool of human Gle1 functional isoforms.
Aditi , Glass L, Dawson TR, Wente SR
(2016) Adv Biol Regul 62: 25-36
MeSH Terms: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Animals, Cytoplasm, Cytoplasmic Granules, Gene Expression, HeLa Cells, Humans, Mutagenesis, Insertional, Nuclear Envelope, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Phytic Acid, Point Mutation, Protein Aggregates, Protein Isoforms, RNA, Small Interfering
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a lethal late onset motor neuron disease with underlying cellular defects in RNA metabolism. In prior studies, two deleterious heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding human (h)Gle1 were identified in ALS patients. hGle1 is an mRNA processing modulator that requires inositol hexakisphosphate (IP) binding for function. Interestingly, one hGLE1 mutation (c.1965-2A>C) results in a novel 88 amino acid C-terminal insertion, generating an altered protein. Like hGle1A, at steady state, the altered protein termed hGle1-IVS14-2A>C is absent from the nuclear envelope rim and localizes to the cytoplasm. hGle1A performs essential cytoplasmic functions in translation and stress granule regulation. Therefore, we speculated that the ALS disease pathology results from altered cellular pools of hGle1 and increased cytoplasmic hGle1 activity. GFP-hGle1-IVS14-2A>C localized to stress granules comparably to GFP-hGle1A, and rescued stress granule defects following siRNA-mediated hGle1 depletion. As described for hGle1A, overexpression of the hGle1-IVS14-2A>C protein also induced formation of larger SGs. Interestingly, hGle1A and the disease associated hGle1-IVS14-2A>C overexpression induced the formation of distinct cytoplasmic protein aggregates that appear similar to those found in neurodegenerative diseases. Strikingly, the ALS-linked hGle1-IVS14-2A>C protein also rescued mRNA export defects upon depletion of endogenous hGle1, acting in a potentially novel bi-functional manner. We conclude that the ALS-linked hGle1-c.1965-2A>C mutation generates a protein isoform capable of both hGle1A- and hGle1B-ascribed functions, and thereby uncoupled from normal mechanisms of hGle1 regulation.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Cytoplasmic hGle1A regulates stress granules by modulation of translation.
Aditi , Folkmann AW, Wente SR
(2015) Mol Biol Cell 26: 1476-90
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Cytoplasmic Granules, Down-Regulation, Humans, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Protein Biosynthesis, Protein Isoforms, Stress, Physiological
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
When eukaryotic cells respond to stress, gene expression pathways change to selectively export and translate subsets of mRNAs. Translationally repressed mRNAs accumulate in cytoplasmic foci known as stress granules (SGs). SGs are in dynamic equilibrium with the translational machinery, but mechanisms controlling this are unclear. Gle1 is required for DEAD-box protein function during mRNA export and translation. We document that human Gle1 (hGle1) is a critical regulator of translation during stress. hGle1 is recruited to SGs, and hGLE1 small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown perturbs SG assembly, resulting in increased numbers of smaller SGs. The rate of SG disassembly is also delayed. Furthermore, SG hGle1-depletion defects correlate with translation perturbations, and the hGle1 role in SGs is independent of mRNA export. Interestingly, we observe isoform-specific roles for hGle1 in which SG function requires hGle1A, whereas mRNA export requires hGle1B. We find that the SG defects in hGle1-depleted cells are rescued by puromycin or DDX3 expression. Together with recent links of hGLE1 mutations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients, these results uncover a paradigm for hGle1A modulating the balance between translation and SGs during stress and disease.
© 2015 Aditi et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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8 MeSH Terms
Deleterious mutations in the essential mRNA metabolism factor, hGle1, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Kaneb HM, Folkmann AW, Belzil VV, Jao LE, Leblond CS, Girard SL, Daoud H, Noreau A, Rochefort D, Hince P, Szuto A, Levert A, Vidal S, André-Guimont C, Camu W, Bouchard JP, Dupré N, Rouleau GA, Wente SR, Dion PA
(2015) Hum Mol Genet 24: 1363-73
MeSH Terms: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Animals, Arthrogryposis, Codon, Nonsense, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Haploinsufficiency, HeLa Cells, Humans, Microscopy, Confocal, Motor Neurons, Mutation, Missense, Nuclear Pore, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Pedigree, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, RNA Splicing, RNA, Messenger, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective death of motor neurons. Causative mutations in the global RNA-processing proteins TDP-43 and FUS among others, as well as their aggregation in ALS patients, have identified defects in RNA metabolism as an important feature in this disease. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 and lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease are autosomal recessive fetal motor neuron diseases that are caused by mutations in another global RNA-processing protein, hGle1. In this study, we carried out the first screening of GLE1 in ALS patients (173 familial and 760 sporadic) and identified 2 deleterious mutations (1 splice site and 1 nonsense mutation) and 1 missense mutation. Functional analysis of the deleterious mutants revealed them to be unable to rescue motor neuron pathology in zebrafish morphants lacking Gle1. Furthermore, in HeLa cells, both mutations caused a depletion of hGle1 at the nuclear pore where it carries out an essential role in nuclear export of mRNA. These results suggest a haploinsufficiency mechanism and point to a causative role for GLE1 mutations in ALS patients. This further supports the involvement of global defects in RNA metabolism in ALS.
© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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19 MeSH Terms
Nucleoporin FG domains facilitate mRNP remodeling at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore complex.
Adams RL, Terry LJ, Wente SR
(2014) Genetics 197: 1213-24
MeSH Terms: Cloning, Molecular, Cytoplasm, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, Genetic Vectors, In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence, Membrane Transport Proteins, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nuclear Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, RNA, Messenger, RNA-Binding Proteins, Ribonucleoproteins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Directional export of messenger RNA (mRNA) protein particles (mRNPs) through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) requires multiple factors. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the NPC proteins Nup159 and Nup42 are asymmetrically localized to the cytoplasmic face and have distinct functional domains: a phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat domain that docks mRNP transport receptors and domains that bind the DEAD-box ATPase Dbp5 and its activating cofactor Gle1, respectively. We speculated that the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains play a role in positioning mRNPs for the terminal mRNP-remodeling steps carried out by Dbp5. Here we find that deletion (Δ) of both the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains results in a cold-sensitive poly(A)+ mRNA export defect. The nup42ΔFG nup159ΔFG mutant also has synthetic lethal genetic interactions with dbp5 and gle1 mutants. RNA cross-linking experiments further indicate that the nup42ΔFG nup159ΔFG mutant has a reduced capacity for mRNP remodeling during export. To further analyze the role of these FG domains, we replaced the Nup159 or Nup42 FG domains with FG domains from other Nups. These FG "swaps" demonstrate that only certain FG domains are functional at the NPC cytoplasmic face. Strikingly, fusing the Nup42 FG domain to the carboxy-terminus of Gle1 bypasses the need for the endogenous Nup42 FG domain, highlighting the importance of proximal positioning for these factors. We conclude that the Nup42 and Nup159 FG domains target the mRNP to Gle1 and Dbp5 for mRNP remodeling at the NPC. Moreover, these results provide key evidence that character and context play a direct role in FG domain function and mRNA export.
Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.
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14 MeSH Terms
Normal telomere length maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires nuclear import of the ever shorter telomeres 1 (Est1) protein via the importin alpha pathway.
Hawkins C, Friedman KL
(2014) Eukaryot Cell 13: 1036-50
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Amino Acid Sequence, Cell Nucleus, Molecular Sequence Data, Nuclear Localization Signals, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, RNA-Binding Proteins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins, Telomerase, Telomere Homeostasis, beta Karyopherins
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
The Est1 (ever shorter telomeres 1) protein is an essential component of yeast telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that restores the repetitive sequences at chromosome ends (telomeres) that would otherwise be lost during DNA replication. Previous work has shown that the telomerase RNA component (TLC1) transits through the cytoplasm during telomerase biogenesis, but mechanisms of protein import have not been addressed. Here we identify three nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) in Est1p. Mutation of the most N-terminal NLS in the context of full-length Est1p reduces Est1p nuclear localization and causes telomere shortening-phenotypes that are rescued by fusion with the NLS from the simian virus 40 (SV40) large-T antigen. In contrast to that of the TLC1 RNA, Est1p nuclear import is facilitated by Srp1p, the yeast homolog of importin α. The reduction in telomere length observed at the semipermissive temperature in a srp1 mutant strain is rescued by increased Est1p expression, consistent with a defect in Est1p nuclear import. These studies suggest that at least two nuclear import pathways are required to achieve normal telomere length homeostasis in yeast.
Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Insights into mRNA export-linked molecular mechanisms of human disease through a Gle1 structure-function analysis.
Folkmann AW, Dawson TR, Wente SR
(2014) Adv Biol Regul 54: 74-91
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arthrogryposis, Cell Nucleus, Humans, Motor Neuron Disease, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, RNA Transport, RNA, Messenger
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2014
A critical step during gene expression is the directional export of nuclear messenger (m)RNA through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) to the cytoplasm. During export, Gle1 in conjunction with inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) spatially regulates the activity of the DEAD-box protein Dbp5 at the NPC cytoplasmic face. GLE1 mutations are causally linked to the human diseases lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 (LCCS-1) and lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease (LAAHD). Here, structure prediction and functional analysis provide strong evidence to suggest that the LCCS-1 and LAAHD disease mutations disrupt the function of Gle1 in mRNA export. Strikingly, direct fluorescence microscopy in living cells reveals a dramatic loss of steady-state NPC localization for GFP-gle1 proteins expressed from human gle1 genes harboring LAAHD and LCCS-1 mutations. The potential significance of these residues is further clarified by analyses of sequence and predicted structural conservation. This work offers insights into the perturbed mechanisms underlying human LCCS-1 and LAAHD disease states and emphasizes the potential impact of altered mRNA transport and gene expression in human disease.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms
Gle1 functions during mRNA export in an oligomeric complex that is altered in human disease.
Folkmann AW, Collier SE, Zhan X, Aditi , Ohi MD, Wente SR
(2013) Cell 155: 582-93
MeSH Terms: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus, Arthrogryposis, HeLa Cells, Humans, Mutation, Nuclear Pore, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, RNA, Messenger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
The conserved multifunctional protein Gle1 regulates gene expression at multiple steps: nuclear mRNA export, translation initiation, and translation termination. A GLE1 mutation (FinMajor) is causally linked to human lethal congenital contracture syndrome-1 (LCCS1); however, the resulting perturbations on Gle1 molecular function were unknown. FinMajor results in a proline-phenylalanine-glutamine peptide insertion within the uncharacterized Gle1 coiled-coil domain. Here, we find that Gle1 self-associates both in vitro and in living cells via the coiled-coil domain. Electron microscopy reveals that high-molecular-mass Gle1 oligomers form ?26 nm diameter disk-shaped particles. With the Gle1-FinMajor protein, these particles are malformed. Moreover, functional assays document a specific requirement for proper Gle1 oligomerization during mRNA export, but not for Gle1's roles in translation. These results identify a mechanistic step in Gle1's mRNA export function at nuclear pore complexes and directly implicate altered export in LCCS1 disease pathology.
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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9 MeSH Terms