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Selective matrix attachment regions in T helper cell subsets support loop conformation in the Ifng gene.
Eivazova ER, Vassetzky YS, Aune TM
(2007) Genes Immun 8: 35-43
MeSH Terms: Animals, Chromosome Structures, Chromosomes, Mammalian, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Techniques, Interferon-gamma, Lithium Compounds, Lymphocyte Activation, Matrix Attachment Regions, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nuclear Matrix, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms, Spleen, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Cytokine genes undergo progressive changes in chromatin organization when naïve CD4+ T helper (Th) cells differentiate into committed Th1 and Th2 lineages. Here, we analyzed nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) in the Ifng gene by DNA array technique in unactivated and activated CD4+ Th cells. This approach was combined with analysis of spatial organization of the Ifng gene by chromosome conformation capture approach to assess the relationship between the gene conformation and matrix attachment organization in functionally different cell subsets. We report that the Ifng gene in unactivated cells displays a linear conformation, but in T-cell receptor-activated cells, it adopts a loop conformation. The selective MARs support the spatial gene organization and characteristically define the Ifng gene in functionally different cell subsets. The pattern of interaction of the Ifng gene with the nuclear matrix dynamically changes in a lineage-specific manner in parallel with the changes in Ifng gene conformation. The data suggest that such structural dynamics provide the means for transcriptional regulation of the Ifng gene in the course of activation and differentiation of CD4+Th cells.
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17 MeSH Terms
Regulation of alternative splicing by SRrp86 and its interacting proteins.
Li J, Hawkins IC, Harvey CD, Jennings JL, Link AJ, Patton JG
(2003) Mol Cell Biol 23: 7437-47
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphatases, Alternative Splicing, Animals, CCAAT-Enhancer-Binding Proteins, Carrier Proteins, Cell Line, DEAD-box RNA Helicases, DNA-Binding Proteins, Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins, Humans, Matrix Attachment Region Binding Proteins, Mice, NFI Transcription Factors, Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins, Nuclear Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Protein Binding, RNA Helicases, RNA, Messenger, RNA-Binding Proteins, Receptors, Estrogen, Serine-Arginine Splicing Factors, Transcription Factors, Two-Hybrid System Techniques, Y-Box-Binding Protein 1
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2013
SRrp86 is a unique member of the SR protein superfamily containing one RNA recognition motif and two serine-arginine (SR)-rich domains separated by an unusual glutamic acid-lysine (EK)-rich region. Previously, we showed that SRrp86 could regulate alternative splicing by both positively and negatively modulating the activity of other SR proteins and that the unique EK domain could inhibit both constitutive and alternative splicing. These functions were most consistent with the model in which SRrp86 functions by interacting with and thereby modulating the activity of target proteins. To identify the specific proteins that interact with SRrp86, we used a yeast two-hybrid library screen and immunoprecipitation coupled to mass spectrometry. We show that SRrp86 interacts with all of the core SR proteins, as well as a subset of other splicing regulatory proteins, including SAF-B, hnRNP G, YB-1, and p72. In contrast to previous results that showed activation of SRp20 by SRrp86, we now show that SAF-B, hnRNP G, and 9G8 all antagonize the activity of SRrp86. Overall, we conclude that not only does SRrp86 regulate SR protein activity but that it is, in turn, regulated by other splicing factors to control alternative splice site selection.
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25 MeSH Terms
AML-1/ETO fusion protein is a dominant negative inhibitor of transcriptional repression by the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein.
Melnick A, Carlile GW, McConnell MJ, Polinger A, Hiebert SW, Licht JD
(2000) Blood 96: 3939-47
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Cell Line, Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit, DNA-Binding Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Kruppel-Like Transcription Factors, Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute, Neoplasm Proteins, Nuclear Matrix, Oncogene Proteins, Fusion, Promyelocytic Leukemia Zinc Finger Protein, Protein Binding, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, RUNX1 Translocation Partner 1 Protein, Repressor Proteins, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
The AML-1/ETO fusion protein, created by the (8;21) translocation in M2-type acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), is a dominant repressive form of AML-1. This effect is due to the ability of the ETO portion of the protein to recruit co-repressors to promoters of AML-1 target genes. The t(11;17)(q21;q23)-associated acute promyelocytic leukemia creates the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger PLZFt/RAR alpha fusion protein and, in a similar manner, inhibits RAR alpha target gene expression and myeloid differentiation. PLZF is expressed in hematopoietic progenitors and functions as a growth suppressor by repressing cyclin A2 and other targets. ETO is a corepressor for PLZF and potentiates transcriptional repression by linking PLZF to a histone deacetylase-containing complex. In transiently transfected cells and in a cell line derived from a patient with t(8;21) leukemia, PLZF and AML-1/ETO formed a tight complex. In transient assays, AML-1/ETO blocked transcriptional repression by PLZF, even at substoichiometric levels relative to PLZF. This effect was dependent on the presence of the ETO zinc finger domain, which recruits corepressors, and could not be rescued by overexpression of co-repressors that normally enhance PLZF repression. AML-1/ETO also excluded PLZF from the nuclear matrix and reduced its ability to bind to its cognate DNA-binding site. Finally, ETO interacted with PLZF/RAR alpha and enhanced its ability to repress through the RARE. These data show a link in the transcriptional pathways of M2 and M3 leukemia. (Blood. 2000;96:3939-3947)
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19 MeSH Terms
Groucho/TLE/R-esp proteins associate with the nuclear matrix and repress RUNX (CBF(alpha)/AML/PEBP2(alpha)) dependent activation of tissue-specific gene transcription.
Javed A, Guo B, Hiebert S, Choi JY, Green J, Zhao SC, Osborne MA, Stifani S, Stein JL, Lian JB, van Wijnen AJ, Stein GS
(2000) J Cell Sci 113 ( Pt 12): 2221-31
MeSH Terms: Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, DNA-Binding Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, HeLa Cells, Humans, Mice, Nuclear Matrix, Nuclear Proteins, Organ Specificity, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Repressor Proteins, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Transcriptional Activation
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
The Runt related transcription factors RUNX (AML/CBF(alpha)/PEBP2(alpha)) are key regulators of hematopoiesis and osteogenesis. Using co-transfection experiments with four natural promoters, including those of the osteocalcin (OC), multi drug resistance (MDR), Rous Sarcoma Virus long terminal repeat (LTR), and bone sialoprotein (BSP) genes, we show that each of these promoters responds differently to the forced expression of RUNX proteins. However, the three RUNX subtypes (i.e. AML1, AML2, and AML3) regulate each promoter in a similar manner. Although the OC promoter is activated in a C terminus dependent manner, the MDR, LTR and BSP promoters are repressed by three distinct mechanisms, either independent of or involving the AML C terminus, or requiring only the conserved C-terminal pentapeptide VWRPY. Using yeast two hybrid assays we find that the C terminus of AML1 interacts with a Groucho/TLE/R-esp repressor protein. Co-expression assays reveal that TLE proteins repress AML dependent activation of OC gene transcription. Western and northern blot analyses suggest that TLE expression is regulated reciprocally with the levels of OC gene expression during osteoblast differentiation. Digital immunofluorescence microscopy results show that TLE1 and TLE2 are both associated with the nuclear matrix, and that a significant subset of each colocalizes with AML transcription factors. This co-localization of TLE and AML proteins is lost upon removing the C terminus of AML family members. Our findings indicate that suppression of AML-dependent gene activation by TLE proteins involves functional interactions with the C terminus of AML at the nuclear matrix in situ. Our data are consistent with the concept that the C termini of AML proteins support activation or repression of cell-type specific genes depending on the regulatory organization of the target promoter and subnuclear localization.
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15 MeSH Terms
The t(8;21) chromosomal translocation in acute myelogenous leukemia modifies intranuclear targeting of the AML1/CBFalpha2 transcription factor.
McNeil S, Zeng C, Harrington KS, Hiebert S, Lian JB, Stein JL, van Wijnen AJ, Stein GS
(1999) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96: 14882-7
MeSH Terms: Biological Transport, Cell Compartmentation, Cell Nucleus, Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit, DNA-Binding Proteins, Humans, Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute, Nuclear Localization Signals, Nuclear Matrix, Oncogene Proteins, Fusion, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, RUNX1 Translocation Partner 1 Protein, Transcription Factors, Translocation, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
Targeting of gene regulatory factors to specific intranuclear sites may be critical for the accurate control of gene expression. The acute myelogenous leukemia 8;21 (AML1/ETO) fusion protein is encoded by a rearranged gene created by the ETO chromosomal translocation. This protein lacks the nuclear matrix-targeting signal that directs the AML1 protein to appropriate gene regulatory sites within the nucleus. Here we report that substitution of the chromosome 8-derived ETO protein for the multifunctional C terminus of AML1 precludes targeting of the factor to AML1 subnuclear domains. Instead, the AML1/ETO fusion protein is redirected by the ETO component to alternate nuclear matrix-associated foci. Our results link the ETO chromosomal translocation in AML with modifications in the intranuclear trafficking of the key hematopoietic regulatory factor, AML1. We conclude that misrouting of gene regulatory factors as a consequence of chromosomal translocations is an important characteristic of acute leukemias.
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14 MeSH Terms
Intranuclear targeting of AML/CBFalpha regulatory factors to nuclear matrix-associated transcriptional domains.
Zeng C, McNeil S, Pockwinse S, Nickerson J, Shopland L, Lawrence JB, Penman S, Hiebert S, Lian JB, van Wijnen AJ, Stein JL, Stein GS
(1998) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95: 1585-9
MeSH Terms: Cell Compartmentation, Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit, DNA-Binding Proteins, HeLa Cells, Humans, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Nuclear Matrix, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, RNA Polymerase II, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic, Transcriptional Activation, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
The AML/CBFalpha runt transcription factors are key regulators of hematopoietic and bone tissue-specific gene expression. These factors contain a 31-amino acid nuclear matrix targeting signal that supports association with the nuclear matrix. We determined that the AML/CBFalpha factors must bind to the nuclear matrix to exert control of transcription. Fusing the nuclear matrix targeting signal to the GAL4 DNA binding domain transactivates a genomically integrated GAL4 responsive reporter gene. These data suggest that AML/CBFalpha must associate with the nuclear matrix to effect transcription. We used fluorescence labeling of epitope-tagged AML-1B (CBFA2) to show it colocalizes with a subset of hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II molecules concentrated in foci and linked to the nuclear matrix. This association of AML-1B with RNA polymerase II requires active transcription and a functional DNA binding domain. The nuclear matrix domains that contain AML-1B are distinct from SC35 RNA processing domains. Our results suggest two of the requirements for AML-dependent transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II are association of AML-1B with the nuclear matrix together with specific binding of AML to gene promoters.
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13 MeSH Terms
Subcellular partitioning of transcription factors during osteoblast differentiation: developmental association of the AML/CBF alpha/PEBP2 alpha-related transcription factor-NMP-2 with the nuclear matrix.
Lindenmuth DM, van Wijnen AJ, Hiebert S, Stein JL, Lian JB, Stein GS
(1997) J Cell Biochem 66: 123-32
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigens, Nuclear, Cell Compartmentation, Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit, Core Binding Factors, DNA-Binding Proteins, Erythroid-Specific DNA-Binding Factors, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Neoplasm Proteins, Nuclear Matrix, Nuclear Proteins, Osteoblasts, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Rats, Sp1 Transcription Factor, Transcription Factor AP-1, Transcription Factors, YY1 Transcription Factor
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
The subnuclear location of transcription factors may functionally contribute to the regulation of gene expression. Several classes of gene regulators associate with the nuclear matrix in a cell type, cell growth, or cell cycle related-manner. To understand control of nuclear matrix-transcription factor interactions during tissue development, we systematically analyzed the subnuclear partitioning of a panel of transcription factors (including NMP-1/YY-1, NMP-2/AML, AP-1, and SP-1) during osteoblast differentiation using biochemical fractionation and gel shift analyses. We show that nuclear matrix association of the tissue-specific AML transcription factor NMP-2, but not the ubiquitous transcription factor YY1, is developmentally upregulated during osteoblast differentiation. Moreover, we show that there are multiple AML isoforms in mature osteoblasts, consistent with the multiplicity of AML factors that are derived from different genes and alternatively spliced cDNAs. These AML isoforms include proteins derived from the AML-3 gene and partition between distinct subcellular compartments. We conclude that the selective partitioning of the YY1 and AML transcription factors with the nuclear matrix involves a discriminatory mechanism that targets different classes and specific isoforms of gene regulatory factors to the nuclear matrix at distinct developmental stages. Our results are consistent with a role for the nuclear matrix in regulating the expression of bone-tissue specific genes during development of the mature osteocytic phenotype.
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18 MeSH Terms
Identification of a nuclear matrix targeting signal in the leukemia and bone-related AML/CBF-alpha transcription factors.
Zeng C, van Wijnen AJ, Stein JL, Meyers S, Sun W, Shopland L, Lawrence JB, Penman S, Lian JB, Stein GS, Hiebert SW
(1997) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94: 6746-51
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Binding Sites, Bone and Bones, Core Binding Factor beta Subunit, DNA-Binding Proteins, Humans, Jurkat Cells, Leukemia, Molecular Sequence Data, Nuclear Matrix, Nuclear Proteins, Transcription Factor AP-2, Transcription Factors, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
Transcription factors of the AML (core binding factor-alpha/polyoma enhancer binding protein 2) class are key transactivators of tissue-specific genes of the hematopoietic and bone lineages. Alternative splicing of the AML-1 gene results in two major AML variants, AML-1 and AML-1B. We show here that the transcriptionally active AML-1B binds to the nuclear matrix, and the inactive AML-1 does not. The association of AML-1B with the nuclear matrix is independent of DNA binding and requires a nuclear matrix targeting signal (NMTS), a 31 amino acid segment near the C terminus that is distinct from nuclear localization signals. A similar NMTS is present in AML-2 and the bone-related AML-3 transcription factors. Fusion of the AML-1B NMTS to the heterologous GAL4-(1-147) protein directs GAL4 to the nuclear matrix. Thus, the NMTS is necessary and sufficient to target the transcriptionally active AML-1B to the nuclear matrix. The loss of the C-terminal domain of AML-1B is a frequent consequence of the leukemia-related t(8;21) and t(3;21) translocations. Our results suggest this loss may be functionally linked to the modified interrelationships between nuclear structure and gene expression characteristic of cancer cells.
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14 MeSH Terms
GLE2, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe export factor RAE1, is required for nuclear pore complex structure and function.
Murphy R, Watkins JL, Wente SR
(1996) Mol Biol Cell 7: 1921-37
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Fungal Proteins, GTPase-Activating Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal, Genes, Lethal, Membrane Proteins, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutagenesis, Nuclear Envelope, Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins, Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins, Nuclear Proteins, Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins, Peptides, Poly A, Proteins, RNA-Binding Proteins, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins, Schizosaccharomyces, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid, alpha Karyopherins
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2014
To identify and characterize novel factors required for nuclear transport, a genetic screen was conducted in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations that were lethal in combination with a null allele of the gene encoding the nucleoporin Nup100p were isolated using a colony-sectoring assay. Three complementation groups of gle (for GLFG lethal) mutants were identified. In this report, the characterization of GLE2 is detailed. GLE2 encodes a 40.5-kDa polypeptide with striking similarity to that of Schizosaccharomyces pombe RAE1. In indirect immunofluorescence and nuclear pore complex fractionation experiments, Gle2p was associated with nuclear pore complexes. Mutated alleles of GLE2 displayed blockage of polyadenylated RNA export; however, nuclear protein import was not apparently diminished. Immunofluorescence and thin-section electron microscopic analysis revealed that the nuclear pore complex and nuclear envelope structure was grossly perturbed in gle2 mutants. Because the clusters of herniated pore complexes appeared subsequent to the export block, the structural perturbations were likely indirect consequences of the export phenotype. Interestingly, a two-hybrid interaction was detected between Gle2p and Srp1p, the nuclear localization signal receptor, as well as Rip1p, a nuclear export signal-interacting protein. We propose that Gle2p has a novel role in mediating nuclear transport.
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23 MeSH Terms
The tissue-specific nuclear matrix protein, NMP-2, is a member of the AML/CBF/PEBP2/runt domain transcription factor family: interactions with the osteocalcin gene promoter.
Merriman HL, van Wijnen AJ, Hiebert S, Bidwell JP, Fey E, Lian J, Stein J, Stein GS
(1995) Biochemistry 34: 13125-32
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Sequence, Consensus Sequence, DNA-Binding Proteins, Gene Expression Regulation, In Vitro Techniques, Molecular Sequence Data, Nuclear Matrix, Nuclear Proteins, Oligodeoxyribonucleotides, Osteocalcin, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Rats, Transcription Factors, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added June 10, 2010
The nuclear matrix protein, NMP-2, was originally identified as an osteoblast-specific DNA-binding complex localized exclusively to the nuclear matrix. NMP-2 was shown to recognize two binding sites, site A (nt-605 to -599) and site B (nt -441 to -435), in the rat bone-specific osteocalcin gene promoter. This study shows that the NMP-2 binding sites A and B as well as a third NMP-2 binding site (nt -135 to -130) constitute a consensus sequence, ATGCTGGT, and represent an AML-1 recognition motif. AML-1 is a member of the AML transcription factor family which is associated with acute myelogenous leukemia and binds to the sequence TGCTGGT via its DNA-binding runt domain. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal that a component of NMP-2 is a member of the AML/PEBP2/runt domain transcription factor family based on cross-competition with AML-1 consensus oligonucleotide. Limited immunoreactivity of NMP-2 with a polyclonal N-terminal AML-1 antibody and inability of the AML-1 partner protein CBF-beta to form complexes with NMP-2 indicate that NMP-2 is not identical to AML-1 but represents a variant AML/PEBP2/runt domain protein. Western and Northern blots reveal the presence of multiple AML-related proteins and AML-1 transcripts in several osseous cell lines. Furthermore, our results indicate that AML family members may selectively partition between nuclear matrix and nonmatrix compartments. Because proteins that contain a runt domain are implicated in tissue-specific transcriptional regulation, our results support the concept that the nuclear matrix mediates osteoblast-specific expression of the osteocalcin gene.
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15 MeSH Terms